Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Brain

Title: Parallels between Post Polio fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a common pathophysiology?
Author: Bruno, R.L., Creange, S.J., and Frick, N.M
Affiliation: Kids' Fatigue Management Program and The Post-Polio Institute, Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, New Jersey
Journal:
Citation: Am J Med.

Publication Year and Month: 1998 09

Abstract: Fatigue is the most commonly reported and most debilitating of post-polio sequelae affecting the >1.8 million North American polio survivors. Post-polio fatigue is characterized by subjective reports of difficulty with attention, cognition, and maintaining wakefulness. These symptoms resemble those reported in nearly 2 dozen outbreaks of post-viral fatigue syndromes (PVFS) that have recurred during this century and that are related clinically, historically, anatomically, or physiologically to poliovirus infections. This article reviews recent studies that relate the symptoms of post-polio fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) to clinically significant deficits on neuropsychologic tests of attention, histopathologic and neuroradiologic evidence of brain lesions, impaired activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, increased prolactin secretion, and electroencephalogram (EEG) slow-wave activity. A possible common pathophysiology for post-polio fatigue and CFS, based on the Brain Fatigue Generator Model of PVFS, and a possible pharmacotherapy for PVFS based on replacement of depleted brain dopamine, will be described

Conclusions: There is evidence of severe brain lesions at the brain stem and less severe lesions in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex which could play a role in general and cognitive fatigue.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Brain

Title: Physiology of the motor cortex in polio survivors.
Author: Lupu, V.D. et al.
Affiliation: EMG Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, CRC, 7-5680, 10 Center Drive, MSC-1404 Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

Journal: Muscle & Nerve
Citation: Muscle Nerve. 2008;37(2):177-82.
DOI: 10.1002/mus.20913

Publication Year and Month: 2008 02

Abstract: We hypothesized that the corticospinal system undergoes functional changes in long-term polio survivors. Central motor conduction times (CMCTs) to the four limbs were measured in 24 polio survivors using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Resting motor thresholds and CMCTs were normal. In 17 subjects whose legs were affected by polio and 13 healthy controls, single- and paired-pulse TMS was used to assess motor cortex excitability while recording from tibialis anterior (TA) muscles at rest and following maximal contraction until fatigue. In polio survivors the slope of the recruitment curve was normal, but maximal motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were larger than in controls. MEPs were depressed after fatiguing exercise. Three patients with central fatigue by twitch interpolation had a trend toward slower recovery. There was no association with symptoms of post-polio syndrome. These changes occurring after polio may allow the motor cortex to activate a greater proportion of the motor neurons innervating affected muscles.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any): There appear to be compensatory effects by the motor cortex to increase the strength of action potentials to innervate muscles that have fewer motor units (due to the polio virus). Surprisingly, this investigation did not find association between PPS or central fatigue with increased central recruitment patterns to innervate remaining muscle tissue.

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There is currently 2 paper in this category.

Category: Brain

Title: Parallels between Post Polio fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a common pathophysiology?
Author: Bruno, R.L., Creange, S.J., and Frick, N.M
Affiliation: Kids' Fatigue Management Program and The Post-Polio Institute, Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, New Jersey
Journal:
Citation: Am J Med.

Publication Year and Month: 1998 09

Abstract: Fatigue is the most commonly reported and most debilitating of post-polio sequelae affecting the >1.8 million North American polio survivors. Post-polio fatigue is characterized by subjective reports of difficulty with attention, cognition, and maintaining wakefulness. These symptoms resemble those reported in nearly 2 dozen outbreaks of post-viral fatigue syndromes (PVFS) that have recurred during this century and that are related clinically, historically, anatomically, or physiologically to poliovirus infections. This article reviews recent studies that relate the symptoms of post-polio fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) to clinically significant deficits on neuropsychologic tests of attention, histopathologic and neuroradiologic evidence of brain lesions, impaired activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, increased prolactin secretion, and electroencephalogram (EEG) slow-wave activity. A possible common pathophysiology for post-polio fatigue and CFS, based on the Brain Fatigue Generator Model of PVFS, and a possible pharmacotherapy for PVFS based on replacement of depleted brain dopamine, will be described

Conclusions: There is evidence of severe brain lesions at the brain stem and less severe lesions in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex which could play a role in general and cognitive fatigue.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Brain

Title: Physiology of the motor cortex in polio survivors.
Author: Lupu, V.D. et al.
Affiliation: EMG Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, CRC, 7-5680, 10 Center Drive, MSC-1404 Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

Journal: Muscle & Nerve
Citation: Muscle Nerve. 2008;37(2):177-82.
DOI: 10.1002/mus.20913

Publication Year and Month: 2008 02

Abstract: We hypothesized that the corticospinal system undergoes functional changes in long-term polio survivors. Central motor conduction times (CMCTs) to the four limbs were measured in 24 polio survivors using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Resting motor thresholds and CMCTs were normal. In 17 subjects whose legs were affected by polio and 13 healthy controls, single- and paired-pulse TMS was used to assess motor cortex excitability while recording from tibialis anterior (TA) muscles at rest and following maximal contraction until fatigue. In polio survivors the slope of the recruitment curve was normal, but maximal motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were larger than in controls. MEPs were depressed after fatiguing exercise. Three patients with central fatigue by twitch interpolation had a trend toward slower recovery. There was no association with symptoms of post-polio syndrome. These changes occurring after polio may allow the motor cortex to activate a greater proportion of the motor neurons innervating affected muscles.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any): There appear to be compensatory effects by the motor cortex to increase the strength of action potentials to innervate muscles that have fewer motor units (due to the polio virus). Surprisingly, this investigation did not find association between PPS or central fatigue with increased central recruitment patterns to innervate remaining muscle tissue.

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There is currently 2 paper in this category.

Category: Brain

Title: Parallels between Post Polio fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a common pathophysiology?
Author: Bruno, R.L., Creange, S.J., and Frick, N.M
Affiliation: Kids' Fatigue Management Program and The Post-Polio Institute, Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, New Jersey
Journal:
Citation: Am J Med.

Publication Year and Month: 1998 09

Abstract: Fatigue is the most commonly reported and most debilitating of post-polio sequelae affecting the >1.8 million North American polio survivors. Post-polio fatigue is characterized by subjective reports of difficulty with attention, cognition, and maintaining wakefulness. These symptoms resemble those reported in nearly 2 dozen outbreaks of post-viral fatigue syndromes (PVFS) that have recurred during this century and that are related clinically, historically, anatomically, or physiologically to poliovirus infections. This article reviews recent studies that relate the symptoms of post-polio fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) to clinically significant deficits on neuropsychologic tests of attention, histopathologic and neuroradiologic evidence of brain lesions, impaired activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, increased prolactin secretion, and electroencephalogram (EEG) slow-wave activity. A possible common pathophysiology for post-polio fatigue and CFS, based on the Brain Fatigue Generator Model of PVFS, and a possible pharmacotherapy for PVFS based on replacement of depleted brain dopamine, will be described

Conclusions: There is evidence of severe brain lesions at the brain stem and less severe lesions in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex which could play a role in general and cognitive fatigue.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Brain

Title: Physiology of the motor cortex in polio survivors.
Author: Lupu, V.D. et al.
Affiliation: EMG Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, CRC, 7-5680, 10 Center Drive, MSC-1404 Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

Journal: Muscle & Nerve
Citation: Muscle Nerve. 2008;37(2):177-82.
DOI: 10.1002/mus.20913

Publication Year and Month: 2008 02

Abstract: We hypothesized that the corticospinal system undergoes functional changes in long-term polio survivors. Central motor conduction times (CMCTs) to the four limbs were measured in 24 polio survivors using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Resting motor thresholds and CMCTs were normal. In 17 subjects whose legs were affected by polio and 13 healthy controls, single- and paired-pulse TMS was used to assess motor cortex excitability while recording from tibialis anterior (TA) muscles at rest and following maximal contraction until fatigue. In polio survivors the slope of the recruitment curve was normal, but maximal motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were larger than in controls. MEPs were depressed after fatiguing exercise. Three patients with central fatigue by twitch interpolation had a trend toward slower recovery. There was no association with symptoms of post-polio syndrome. These changes occurring after polio may allow the motor cortex to activate a greater proportion of the motor neurons innervating affected muscles.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any): There appear to be compensatory effects by the motor cortex to increase the strength of action potentials to innervate muscles that have fewer motor units (due to the polio virus). Surprisingly, this investigation did not find association between PPS or central fatigue with increased central recruitment patterns to innervate remaining muscle tissue.

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There is currently 2 paper in this category.

Category: Brain

Title: Physiology of the motor cortex in polio survivors.
Author: Lupu, V.D. et al.
Affiliation: EMG Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, CRC, 7-5680, 10 Center Drive, MSC-1404 Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

Journal: Muscle & Nerve
Citation: Muscle Nerve. 2008;37(2):177-82.
DOI: 10.1002/mus.20913

Publication Year and Month: 2008 02

Abstract: We hypothesized that the corticospinal system undergoes functional changes in long-term polio survivors. Central motor conduction times (CMCTs) to the four limbs were measured in 24 polio survivors using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Resting motor thresholds and CMCTs were normal. In 17 subjects whose legs were affected by polio and 13 healthy controls, single- and paired-pulse TMS was used to assess motor cortex excitability while recording from tibialis anterior (TA) muscles at rest and following maximal contraction until fatigue. In polio survivors the slope of the recruitment curve was normal, but maximal motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were larger than in controls. MEPs were depressed after fatiguing exercise. Three patients with central fatigue by twitch interpolation had a trend toward slower recovery. There was no association with symptoms of post-polio syndrome. These changes occurring after polio may allow the motor cortex to activate a greater proportion of the motor neurons innervating affected muscles.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any): There appear to be compensatory effects by the motor cortex to increase the strength of action potentials to innervate muscles that have fewer motor units (due to the polio virus). Surprisingly, this investigation did not find association between PPS or central fatigue with increased central recruitment patterns to innervate remaining muscle tissue.

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Brain

Title: Parallels between Post Polio fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: a common pathophysiology?
Author: Bruno, R.L., Creange, S.J., and Frick, N.M
Affiliation: Kids' Fatigue Management Program and The Post-Polio Institute, Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, New Jersey
Journal:
Citation: Am J Med.

Publication Year and Month: 1998 09

Abstract: Fatigue is the most commonly reported and most debilitating of post-polio sequelae affecting the >1.8 million North American polio survivors. Post-polio fatigue is characterized by subjective reports of difficulty with attention, cognition, and maintaining wakefulness. These symptoms resemble those reported in nearly 2 dozen outbreaks of post-viral fatigue syndromes (PVFS) that have recurred during this century and that are related clinically, historically, anatomically, or physiologically to poliovirus infections. This article reviews recent studies that relate the symptoms of post-polio fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) to clinically significant deficits on neuropsychologic tests of attention, histopathologic and neuroradiologic evidence of brain lesions, impaired activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, increased prolactin secretion, and electroencephalogram (EEG) slow-wave activity. A possible common pathophysiology for post-polio fatigue and CFS, based on the Brain Fatigue Generator Model of PVFS, and a possible pharmacotherapy for PVFS based on replacement of depleted brain dopamine, will be described

Conclusions: There is evidence of severe brain lesions at the brain stem and less severe lesions in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex which could play a role in general and cognitive fatigue.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There is currently 2 paper in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications