Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: A randomized controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 for fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis
Author: Peel MM (1), Cooke M (1), Lewis-Peel HJ (1), Lea RA (2), Moyle W (1)
Affiliation: (1) NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Nursing Interventions, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia; (2) Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia
Journal: Complementary Therapies in Medicine
Citation: Complementary Therapies in Medicine 23 (2015), pp. 789-793; DOI information: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.09.002

Publication Year and Month: 2015 12

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine if coenzyme Q10 alleviates fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

DESIGN: Parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

BACKGROUND SETTING: Coenzyme Q10 has been shown to boost muscle energy metabolism in post-polio subjects but it does not promote muscle strength, endurance or function in polio survivors with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. However, the collective increased energy metabolism might contribute to a reduction in post-polio fatigue.

PARTICIPANTS: Polio survivors from the Australian post-polio networks in Queensland and New South Wales who attribute a moderate to high level of fatigue to their diagnosed late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Those with fatigue-associated comorbidities of diabetes, anaemia, hypothyroidism and fibromyalgia were excluded.

METHOD: Participants were assigned (1:1), with stratification of those who use energy-saving mobility aids, to receive 100 mg coenzyme Q10 or matching placebo daily for 60 days. Participants and investigators were blinded to group allocation. Fatigue was assessed by the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue as the primary outcome and the Fatigue Severity Scale as secondary outcome.

RESULTS: Of 103 participants, 54 were assigned to receive coenzyme Q10 and 49 to receive the placebo. The difference in the mean score reductions between the two groups was not statistically significant for either fatigue measure. Oral supplementation with coenzyme Q10 was safe and well-tolerated.

The registration number for the clinical trial is ACTRN 12612000552886.

Conclusions: A daily dose of 100 mg coenzyme Q10 for 60 days does not alleviate the fatigue of the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any): The results of this trial were found to be inconclusive.

Separately, a review on muscle pain associated with statin medication (reference below) discussed the challenges differentiating muscle pain, eliciting changes at the mitochondria (“powerhouse” of muscle cells) from Co-enzyme Q10 and the interactions diet can have in producing the changes. Interestingly, the author also questioned the dosage often used in studies of 100mg (including this one) may not be sufficient to create the change from the supplement. This highlights the need for further research, and potentially re-visiting previous studies that looked at co-enzyme Q10 supplementation.
Taylor, BA. Does Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Mitigate Statin-Associated Muscle Symptoms? Pharmacological and Methodological Considerations. Am J Cardiovasc Drugs. 2018;18(2):75-82.

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Clinical neurological and tongue inspection according to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) – evaluation of post polio syndrome patients
Author: Abe, G.C., Ramos, P.E., da Silva, B.L., Quadros, A.J., Oliveira, A.S.B.
Affiliation: Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Neurologia e Neurocirurgia, São Paulo - SP, Brazil
Journal: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Citation: Volume 381, Supplement, 15 October 2017, Pages 199-200

Publication Year and Month: 2017 10

Abstract: Objective: To describe tongue characteristics of PPS patients relating to neurology.

RESULTS
89 individuals were evaluated within a 12 month period, 61 (68,5%) females, 28(31,5%)males, aged from 32–57 years old (mean = 46). The most frequent characteristics were: decreased moisture (52.5%); thick whitish coating (60.7%); red color (46,1%), and normal movement (49.4%). The enlarged size (40.4%) prevailed over the small/thin size (15.7%). The presence of “other findings” (OF) was over 70%.

Conclusions: Conclusion: The frequency of enlarged size associated to minor normal characteristics in OF and in tongue coating suggests that the group has a less marked impairment within the natural history of PPS.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Efficacy of Oral Care Provided by Interprofessional Collaboration for a Patient with Esophageal Cancer Associated with Post-polio Syndrome during Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.
Author: Takahashi-Arimasa K, Kohno-Yamanaka R, Soga Y, Miura R, Morita M.
Affiliation: Dental Hygienist Team, Division of Medical Technology, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Acta Medica Okayama, Volume73 Issue1, 2019-02
Publication Year and Month: 2019 02

Abstract: Preoperative oral care is helpful to prevent postoperative complications in patients who are undergoing esophagectomy. Here, we report the case of an 81-year-old Japanese man with an upper limb disability caused by post-polio syndrome who was receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for esophageal cancer. He had poor oral health status and developed oral complications as a side effect of chemotherapy. He could not brush his teeth by himself. However, infection control by oral care provided by an interprofessional collaboration successfully improved his oral hygiene, and his follow-up involved no severe complications. Interprofessional collaboration is useful especially for patients with upper limb disability.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome
Author: DeMayo W, Singh B, Duryea B, Riley D
Affiliation: Southern California University of the Health Sciences, USA
Journal: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Citation: Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2):24-5
Publication Year and Month: 2004 03

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract. The following is an extract:
Conemaugh Health System has completed a preliminary outcome study evaluating the benefits of Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome (PPS). This research integrates clinical trials investigating the application of Hatha yoga with ongoing patient care and education. The results of this clinical trial will be used to develop a longitudinal data collection effort integrating research and clinical trials investigating the applications of Hatha yoga in ongoing patient care and education.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Qigong on Cold Intolerance in Patients with Post-Poliomyelitis Syndrome
Author: Ramos, PS, Abe, GC, Pradella-Hallinan, M, Quadros, AAJ, Tao, T, Oliveira, ASB.
Affiliation: Federal University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TUTCM), Tianjin, China.
Department of Tuina and Orthopedics, Tuina and Orthopedics Clinic, The First Teaching Hospital, Tianjin, China.
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Scientific Research
2018 Vol1(1). DOI:10.4236/health.2017.101004
Publication Year and Month: 2018 01

Abstract: Post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) is a disorder in individuals who have had poliomyelitis, characterized by new muscle weakness and often associated with other symptoms, including cold intolerance (CI). Qigong is a Traditional Chinese Medicine technique to adjust energy and blood circulation. Objective: To verify the effects and late repercussions of Qigong on CI complaints in PPS patients. Methods: PPS patients (n = 22, 14 females, 8 males; ages 35 - 60) performed Qigong exercises in 40-minute sessions, three times per week, for three consecutive months. They were evaluated at baseline, the end of treatment and every three months for a year using a visual analogue scale adapted for CI (VAS-cold). Results: The systemic VAS-cold scores exhibited significant differences between the baseline, the end of treatment and throughout 12 months of follow-up. Conclusion: The CI scores were low and bearable at the end of intervention and for the following 12 months without activity.

Conclusions: We found that following DQ training, the complaints of CI exhibited statistically significant improvement in all the participants, and the sensitivity to cold exhibited low scores and bearable levels at the end of intervention and in the evaluations performed during the following 12 months.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Myofascial Release: Perspective of an informed consumer.
Author: DOROTHY WOODSMITH, RN, PHD,
Affiliation: UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MAINE, PORTLAND, MAINE
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Polio Network News, Winter 1997 Vol. 13 No.1
Publication Year and Month: 1997

Abstract: As the recipient of over 50 myofascial release treatments for my polio-related symptoms administered by Steven Moreau, MS, Pz I want to discuss the
topic from the perspective of an informed consumer.
I have paraphrased and quoted from materials
prepared by Moreau.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: No Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Training on Muscle Strength and Gait Performance in Persons With Late Effects of Polio: A Pilot Study
Author: Brogardh C, Flansbjer U-B, Lexell J.
Affiliation: Skane University Hospital
Lund University
Lulea University of Technology
Journal: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Citation: Volume 91, Issue 9, September 2010, Pages 1474-1477
Publication Year and Month: 2010 09

Abstract: Objective
To evaluate the feasibility and possible effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on muscle strength and gait performance in people with late effects of polio.

Design
A case-controlled pilot study with assessments before and after training.

Setting
A university hospital rehabilitation department.

Participants
People (N=5; 3 men, 2 women; mean age, 64±6.7y; range, 55−71y) with clinically and electrophysiologically verified late effects of polio.

Interventions
All participants underwent 10 sessions of supervised WBV training (standing with knees flexed 40°−55° up to 60 seconds per repetition and 10 repetitions per session twice weekly for 5 weeks).

Main Outcome Measures
Isokinetic and isometric knee muscle strength (dynamometer), and gait performance (Timed Up & Go, Comfortable Gait Speed, Fast Gait Speed, and six-minute walk tests).

Results
All participants completed the 5 weeks of WBV training, with no discernible discomfort. No significant changes in knee muscle strength or gait performance were found after the WBV training period.

Conclusions: This pilot study did not show any significant improvements in knee muscle strength and gait performance following a standard protocol of WBV training. Thus, the results do not lend support to WBV training for people with late effects of polio.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Pitting oedema in a polio survivor with lumbar radiculopathy complicated disc herniation
Author: Eric Chun Pu Chu, Aaron Ka Chun Chan, Andy Fu Chieh Lin
Affiliation: New York Chiropractic and Physiotherapy Center, New York Medical Group, Hong Kong, China
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. Volume : 8 | Issue : 5 | Page : 1765-1768
Publication Year and Month: 2019 05

Abstract: We report a 58-year-old male with sequelae of polio who presented with low back and left buttock pain, and pitting oedema of both legs for four months. The patient had a history of poliomyelitis at the age of 1 year which resulted in bilateral lower leg weakness, particularly on the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging showed cervical spinal stenosis secondary to posterior osteophyte formation, left paracentral disc extrusion at L2/L3 and L3/L4 levels with compression of the traversing L4 nerve root. The findings confirmed a diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy caused by a herniated disc. The patient subsequently underwent a chiropractic treatment. The painful symptoms and pitting oedema in this case resolved with spinal adjustment in addition to scraping therapy to strengthen bilateral low back and the gluteal muscles. This case provides circumstantial evidence of a scarcely mentioned association between pitting oedema and lumbar radiculopathy caused by disc herniation. The pathophysiological mechanism is elusive, but might involve a complexity of cytokine-mediated inflammation and interconnection between somatic and autonomic nervous systems.

Conclusions: This case provides circumstantial evidence of a scarcely mentioned association between pitting oedema and lumbar radiculopathy caused by disc herniation.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Risk assessment and prognostic in patients with post polio syndrome according to systematic tongue analysis adapted from traditional Chinese medicine
Author: Abe, G.C., Ramos, P.E. da Silva, B.L., Mello, C.A.D.S., Quadros, A.A.J., Oliveira, A.S.B.
Affiliation: Federal University of São Paulo, Neurology and Neurosurgery, São Paulo, Brazil
Journal: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Citation: Volume 381, Supplement, 15 October 2017, Pages 1138-1139

Publication Year and Month: 2017 10

Abstract: Background: The tongue is used in traditional Chinese medicine for prognostic assessment. Muscle weakness, fatigue, pain and other symptoms occur with great variability in post polio syndrome (PPS).

Objective: Identify risk patients in a group with PPS through observation of tongue coating with systematic tongue analysis (STA).

Conclusions: Conclusion: STA identified, through the coating, a patient with worsening risk confirmed; and a patient with association of severe chronic diseases (her follow-up will be analyzed in a later work).

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Whole body vibration on people with sequelae of polio
Author: Da Silva CP, Szot CL, de Sa N.
Affiliation: School of Physical Therapy, Texas Woman's University, Houston, USA
Supported by the Post-polio Health International 2013–2014
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
Whole body vibration on people with sequelae of polio, Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, (2018). DOI: 10.1080/09593985.2018.1454559
Publication Year and Month: 2018 10

Abstract: Purpose: The purpose was to explore the feasibility of whole body vibration (WBV) on polio survivors with/without post-polio syndrome (PPS) by studying its effects on walking speed (10-m walk test), endurance (2-min walk test), pain severity/interference (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index), fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale), leg strength (manual muscle testing and hand-held dynamometry), and muscle cramping (written logs). Methods: Fifteen individuals completed the study, participating in eight sessions in two 4-week blocks. Participants started with ten 1-min vibration bouts/session, increasing to 20 min. Low (amplitude 4.53 mm, g force 2.21) and higher (amplitude 8.82 mm, g force 2.76) intensity blocked intervention occurred in random order crossover design. Blinded testing ensued before/after intervention blocks and at follow-up. Results: No study-related adverse events occurred. Participants starting first with higher intensity intervention improved in walking speed (p = 0.017). BPI pain severity significantly improved (p = 0.049) after higher intensity intervention. No significant changes were found after low intensity vibration or in other outcome measures. Conclusions: WBV appears to be a safe exercise for this population. Long-term use in polio survivors needs to be researched, particularly in reducing barriers to participation to promote the physical aspects of health.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Complementary therapies aim to treat the whole person, not just the symptoms. These papers propose that polio survivors should have access to the treatments that they perceive as important. However, longitudinal data collection and clinical trials investigating the applications are required for ongoing patient care and education.

There are currently 10 papers in this category.

Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Risk assessment and prognostic in patients with post polio syndrome according to systematic tongue analysis adapted from traditional Chinese medicine
Author: Abe, G.C., Ramos, P.E. da Silva, B.L., Mello, C.A.D.S., Quadros, A.A.J., Oliveira, A.S.B.
Affiliation: Federal University of São Paulo, Neurology and Neurosurgery, São Paulo, Brazil
Journal: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Citation: Volume 381, Supplement, 15 October 2017, Pages 1138-1139

Publication Year and Month: 2017 10

Abstract: Background: The tongue is used in traditional Chinese medicine for prognostic assessment. Muscle weakness, fatigue, pain and other symptoms occur with great variability in post polio syndrome (PPS).

Objective: Identify risk patients in a group with PPS through observation of tongue coating with systematic tongue analysis (STA).

Conclusions: Conclusion: STA identified, through the coating, a patient with worsening risk confirmed; and a patient with association of severe chronic diseases (her follow-up will be analyzed in a later work).

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Clinical neurological and tongue inspection according to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) – evaluation of post polio syndrome patients
Author: Abe, G.C., Ramos, P.E., da Silva, B.L., Quadros, A.J., Oliveira, A.S.B.
Affiliation: Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Neurologia e Neurocirurgia, São Paulo - SP, Brazil
Journal: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Citation: Volume 381, Supplement, 15 October 2017, Pages 199-200

Publication Year and Month: 2017 10

Abstract: Objective: To describe tongue characteristics of PPS patients relating to neurology.

RESULTS
89 individuals were evaluated within a 12 month period, 61 (68,5%) females, 28(31,5%)males, aged from 32–57 years old (mean = 46). The most frequent characteristics were: decreased moisture (52.5%); thick whitish coating (60.7%); red color (46,1%), and normal movement (49.4%). The enlarged size (40.4%) prevailed over the small/thin size (15.7%). The presence of “other findings” (OF) was over 70%.

Conclusions: Conclusion: The frequency of enlarged size associated to minor normal characteristics in OF and in tongue coating suggests that the group has a less marked impairment within the natural history of PPS.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: No Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Training on Muscle Strength and Gait Performance in Persons With Late Effects of Polio: A Pilot Study
Author: Brogardh C, Flansbjer U-B, Lexell J.
Affiliation: Skane University Hospital
Lund University
Lulea University of Technology
Journal: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Citation: Volume 91, Issue 9, September 2010, Pages 1474-1477
Publication Year and Month: 2010 09

Abstract: Objective
To evaluate the feasibility and possible effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on muscle strength and gait performance in people with late effects of polio.

Design
A case-controlled pilot study with assessments before and after training.

Setting
A university hospital rehabilitation department.

Participants
People (N=5; 3 men, 2 women; mean age, 64±6.7y; range, 55−71y) with clinically and electrophysiologically verified late effects of polio.

Interventions
All participants underwent 10 sessions of supervised WBV training (standing with knees flexed 40°−55° up to 60 seconds per repetition and 10 repetitions per session twice weekly for 5 weeks).

Main Outcome Measures
Isokinetic and isometric knee muscle strength (dynamometer), and gait performance (Timed Up & Go, Comfortable Gait Speed, Fast Gait Speed, and six-minute walk tests).

Results
All participants completed the 5 weeks of WBV training, with no discernible discomfort. No significant changes in knee muscle strength or gait performance were found after the WBV training period.

Conclusions: This pilot study did not show any significant improvements in knee muscle strength and gait performance following a standard protocol of WBV training. Thus, the results do not lend support to WBV training for people with late effects of polio.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Whole body vibration on people with sequelae of polio
Author: Da Silva CP, Szot CL, de Sa N.
Affiliation: School of Physical Therapy, Texas Woman's University, Houston, USA
Supported by the Post-polio Health International 2013–2014
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
Whole body vibration on people with sequelae of polio, Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, (2018). DOI: 10.1080/09593985.2018.1454559
Publication Year and Month: 2018 10

Abstract: Purpose: The purpose was to explore the feasibility of whole body vibration (WBV) on polio survivors with/without post-polio syndrome (PPS) by studying its effects on walking speed (10-m walk test), endurance (2-min walk test), pain severity/interference (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index), fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale), leg strength (manual muscle testing and hand-held dynamometry), and muscle cramping (written logs). Methods: Fifteen individuals completed the study, participating in eight sessions in two 4-week blocks. Participants started with ten 1-min vibration bouts/session, increasing to 20 min. Low (amplitude 4.53 mm, g force 2.21) and higher (amplitude 8.82 mm, g force 2.76) intensity blocked intervention occurred in random order crossover design. Blinded testing ensued before/after intervention blocks and at follow-up. Results: No study-related adverse events occurred. Participants starting first with higher intensity intervention improved in walking speed (p = 0.017). BPI pain severity significantly improved (p = 0.049) after higher intensity intervention. No significant changes were found after low intensity vibration or in other outcome measures. Conclusions: WBV appears to be a safe exercise for this population. Long-term use in polio survivors needs to be researched, particularly in reducing barriers to participation to promote the physical aspects of health.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome
Author: DeMayo W, Singh B, Duryea B, Riley D
Affiliation: Southern California University of the Health Sciences, USA
Journal: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Citation: Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2):24-5
Publication Year and Month: 2004 03

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract. The following is an extract:
Conemaugh Health System has completed a preliminary outcome study evaluating the benefits of Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome (PPS). This research integrates clinical trials investigating the application of Hatha yoga with ongoing patient care and education. The results of this clinical trial will be used to develop a longitudinal data collection effort integrating research and clinical trials investigating the applications of Hatha yoga in ongoing patient care and education.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Myofascial Release: Perspective of an informed consumer.
Author: DOROTHY WOODSMITH, RN, PHD,
Affiliation: UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MAINE, PORTLAND, MAINE
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Polio Network News, Winter 1997 Vol. 13 No.1
Publication Year and Month: 1997

Abstract: As the recipient of over 50 myofascial release treatments for my polio-related symptoms administered by Steven Moreau, MS, Pz I want to discuss the
topic from the perspective of an informed consumer.
I have paraphrased and quoted from materials
prepared by Moreau.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Pitting oedema in a polio survivor with lumbar radiculopathy complicated disc herniation
Author: Eric Chun Pu Chu, Aaron Ka Chun Chan, Andy Fu Chieh Lin
Affiliation: New York Chiropractic and Physiotherapy Center, New York Medical Group, Hong Kong, China
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. Volume : 8 | Issue : 5 | Page : 1765-1768
Publication Year and Month: 2019 05

Abstract: We report a 58-year-old male with sequelae of polio who presented with low back and left buttock pain, and pitting oedema of both legs for four months. The patient had a history of poliomyelitis at the age of 1 year which resulted in bilateral lower leg weakness, particularly on the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging showed cervical spinal stenosis secondary to posterior osteophyte formation, left paracentral disc extrusion at L2/L3 and L3/L4 levels with compression of the traversing L4 nerve root. The findings confirmed a diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy caused by a herniated disc. The patient subsequently underwent a chiropractic treatment. The painful symptoms and pitting oedema in this case resolved with spinal adjustment in addition to scraping therapy to strengthen bilateral low back and the gluteal muscles. This case provides circumstantial evidence of a scarcely mentioned association between pitting oedema and lumbar radiculopathy caused by disc herniation. The pathophysiological mechanism is elusive, but might involve a complexity of cytokine-mediated inflammation and interconnection between somatic and autonomic nervous systems.

Conclusions: This case provides circumstantial evidence of a scarcely mentioned association between pitting oedema and lumbar radiculopathy caused by disc herniation.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: A randomized controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 for fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis
Author: Peel MM (1), Cooke M (1), Lewis-Peel HJ (1), Lea RA (2), Moyle W (1)
Affiliation: (1) NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Nursing Interventions, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia; (2) Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia
Journal: Complementary Therapies in Medicine
Citation: Complementary Therapies in Medicine 23 (2015), pp. 789-793; DOI information: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.09.002

Publication Year and Month: 2015 12

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine if coenzyme Q10 alleviates fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

DESIGN: Parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

BACKGROUND SETTING: Coenzyme Q10 has been shown to boost muscle energy metabolism in post-polio subjects but it does not promote muscle strength, endurance or function in polio survivors with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. However, the collective increased energy metabolism might contribute to a reduction in post-polio fatigue.

PARTICIPANTS: Polio survivors from the Australian post-polio networks in Queensland and New South Wales who attribute a moderate to high level of fatigue to their diagnosed late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Those with fatigue-associated comorbidities of diabetes, anaemia, hypothyroidism and fibromyalgia were excluded.

METHOD: Participants were assigned (1:1), with stratification of those who use energy-saving mobility aids, to receive 100 mg coenzyme Q10 or matching placebo daily for 60 days. Participants and investigators were blinded to group allocation. Fatigue was assessed by the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue as the primary outcome and the Fatigue Severity Scale as secondary outcome.

RESULTS: Of 103 participants, 54 were assigned to receive coenzyme Q10 and 49 to receive the placebo. The difference in the mean score reductions between the two groups was not statistically significant for either fatigue measure. Oral supplementation with coenzyme Q10 was safe and well-tolerated.

The registration number for the clinical trial is ACTRN 12612000552886.

Conclusions: A daily dose of 100 mg coenzyme Q10 for 60 days does not alleviate the fatigue of the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any): The results of this trial were found to be inconclusive.

Separately, a review on muscle pain associated with statin medication (reference below) discussed the challenges differentiating muscle pain, eliciting changes at the mitochondria (“powerhouse” of muscle cells) from Co-enzyme Q10 and the interactions diet can have in producing the changes. Interestingly, the author also questioned the dosage often used in studies of 100mg (including this one) may not be sufficient to create the change from the supplement. This highlights the need for further research, and potentially re-visiting previous studies that looked at co-enzyme Q10 supplementation.
Taylor, BA. Does Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Mitigate Statin-Associated Muscle Symptoms? Pharmacological and Methodological Considerations. Am J Cardiovasc Drugs. 2018;18(2):75-82.

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Qigong on Cold Intolerance in Patients with Post-Poliomyelitis Syndrome
Author: Ramos, PS, Abe, GC, Pradella-Hallinan, M, Quadros, AAJ, Tao, T, Oliveira, ASB.
Affiliation: Federal University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TUTCM), Tianjin, China.
Department of Tuina and Orthopedics, Tuina and Orthopedics Clinic, The First Teaching Hospital, Tianjin, China.
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Scientific Research
2018 Vol1(1). DOI:10.4236/health.2017.101004
Publication Year and Month: 2018 01

Abstract: Post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) is a disorder in individuals who have had poliomyelitis, characterized by new muscle weakness and often associated with other symptoms, including cold intolerance (CI). Qigong is a Traditional Chinese Medicine technique to adjust energy and blood circulation. Objective: To verify the effects and late repercussions of Qigong on CI complaints in PPS patients. Methods: PPS patients (n = 22, 14 females, 8 males; ages 35 - 60) performed Qigong exercises in 40-minute sessions, three times per week, for three consecutive months. They were evaluated at baseline, the end of treatment and every three months for a year using a visual analogue scale adapted for CI (VAS-cold). Results: The systemic VAS-cold scores exhibited significant differences between the baseline, the end of treatment and throughout 12 months of follow-up. Conclusion: The CI scores were low and bearable at the end of intervention and for the following 12 months without activity.

Conclusions: We found that following DQ training, the complaints of CI exhibited statistically significant improvement in all the participants, and the sensitivity to cold exhibited low scores and bearable levels at the end of intervention and in the evaluations performed during the following 12 months.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

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Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Efficacy of Oral Care Provided by Interprofessional Collaboration for a Patient with Esophageal Cancer Associated with Post-polio Syndrome during Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.
Author: Takahashi-Arimasa K, Kohno-Yamanaka R, Soga Y, Miura R, Morita M.
Affiliation: Dental Hygienist Team, Division of Medical Technology, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Acta Medica Okayama, Volume73 Issue1, 2019-02
Publication Year and Month: 2019 02

Abstract: Preoperative oral care is helpful to prevent postoperative complications in patients who are undergoing esophagectomy. Here, we report the case of an 81-year-old Japanese man with an upper limb disability caused by post-polio syndrome who was receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for esophageal cancer. He had poor oral health status and developed oral complications as a side effect of chemotherapy. He could not brush his teeth by himself. However, infection control by oral care provided by an interprofessional collaboration successfully improved his oral hygiene, and his follow-up involved no severe complications. Interprofessional collaboration is useful especially for patients with upper limb disability.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Complementary therapies aim to treat the whole person, not just the symptoms. These papers propose that polio survivors should have access to the treatments that they perceive as important. However, longitudinal data collection and clinical trials investigating the applications are required for ongoing patient care and education.

There are currently 10 papers in this category.

Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome
Author: DeMayo W, Singh B, Duryea B, Riley D
Affiliation: Southern California University of the Health Sciences, USA
Journal: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Citation: Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2):24-5
Publication Year and Month: 2004 03

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract. The following is an extract:
Conemaugh Health System has completed a preliminary outcome study evaluating the benefits of Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome (PPS). This research integrates clinical trials investigating the application of Hatha yoga with ongoing patient care and education. The results of this clinical trial will be used to develop a longitudinal data collection effort integrating research and clinical trials investigating the applications of Hatha yoga in ongoing patient care and education.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

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Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: No Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Training on Muscle Strength and Gait Performance in Persons With Late Effects of Polio: A Pilot Study
Author: Brogardh C, Flansbjer U-B, Lexell J.
Affiliation: Skane University Hospital
Lund University
Lulea University of Technology
Journal: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Citation: Volume 91, Issue 9, September 2010, Pages 1474-1477
Publication Year and Month: 2010 09

Abstract: Objective
To evaluate the feasibility and possible effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on muscle strength and gait performance in people with late effects of polio.

Design
A case-controlled pilot study with assessments before and after training.

Setting
A university hospital rehabilitation department.

Participants
People (N=5; 3 men, 2 women; mean age, 64±6.7y; range, 55−71y) with clinically and electrophysiologically verified late effects of polio.

Interventions
All participants underwent 10 sessions of supervised WBV training (standing with knees flexed 40°−55° up to 60 seconds per repetition and 10 repetitions per session twice weekly for 5 weeks).

Main Outcome Measures
Isokinetic and isometric knee muscle strength (dynamometer), and gait performance (Timed Up & Go, Comfortable Gait Speed, Fast Gait Speed, and six-minute walk tests).

Results
All participants completed the 5 weeks of WBV training, with no discernible discomfort. No significant changes in knee muscle strength or gait performance were found after the WBV training period.

Conclusions: This pilot study did not show any significant improvements in knee muscle strength and gait performance following a standard protocol of WBV training. Thus, the results do not lend support to WBV training for people with late effects of polio.

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: A randomized controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 for fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis
Author: Peel MM (1), Cooke M (1), Lewis-Peel HJ (1), Lea RA (2), Moyle W (1)
Affiliation: (1) NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Nursing Interventions, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia; (2) Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia
Journal: Complementary Therapies in Medicine
Citation: Complementary Therapies in Medicine 23 (2015), pp. 789-793; DOI information: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.09.002

Publication Year and Month: 2015 12

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine if coenzyme Q10 alleviates fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

DESIGN: Parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

BACKGROUND SETTING: Coenzyme Q10 has been shown to boost muscle energy metabolism in post-polio subjects but it does not promote muscle strength, endurance or function in polio survivors with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. However, the collective increased energy metabolism might contribute to a reduction in post-polio fatigue.

PARTICIPANTS: Polio survivors from the Australian post-polio networks in Queensland and New South Wales who attribute a moderate to high level of fatigue to their diagnosed late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Those with fatigue-associated comorbidities of diabetes, anaemia, hypothyroidism and fibromyalgia were excluded.

METHOD: Participants were assigned (1:1), with stratification of those who use energy-saving mobility aids, to receive 100 mg coenzyme Q10 or matching placebo daily for 60 days. Participants and investigators were blinded to group allocation. Fatigue was assessed by the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue as the primary outcome and the Fatigue Severity Scale as secondary outcome.

RESULTS: Of 103 participants, 54 were assigned to receive coenzyme Q10 and 49 to receive the placebo. The difference in the mean score reductions between the two groups was not statistically significant for either fatigue measure. Oral supplementation with coenzyme Q10 was safe and well-tolerated.

The registration number for the clinical trial is ACTRN 12612000552886.

Conclusions: A daily dose of 100 mg coenzyme Q10 for 60 days does not alleviate the fatigue of the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any): The results of this trial were found to be inconclusive.

Separately, a review on muscle pain associated with statin medication (reference below) discussed the challenges differentiating muscle pain, eliciting changes at the mitochondria (“powerhouse” of muscle cells) from Co-enzyme Q10 and the interactions diet can have in producing the changes. Interestingly, the author also questioned the dosage often used in studies of 100mg (including this one) may not be sufficient to create the change from the supplement. This highlights the need for further research, and potentially re-visiting previous studies that looked at co-enzyme Q10 supplementation.
Taylor, BA. Does Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Mitigate Statin-Associated Muscle Symptoms? Pharmacological and Methodological Considerations. Am J Cardiovasc Drugs. 2018;18(2):75-82.

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Risk assessment and prognostic in patients with post polio syndrome according to systematic tongue analysis adapted from traditional Chinese medicine
Author: Abe, G.C., Ramos, P.E. da Silva, B.L., Mello, C.A.D.S., Quadros, A.A.J., Oliveira, A.S.B.
Affiliation: Federal University of São Paulo, Neurology and Neurosurgery, São Paulo, Brazil
Journal: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Citation: Volume 381, Supplement, 15 October 2017, Pages 1138-1139

Publication Year and Month: 2017 10

Abstract: Background: The tongue is used in traditional Chinese medicine for prognostic assessment. Muscle weakness, fatigue, pain and other symptoms occur with great variability in post polio syndrome (PPS).

Objective: Identify risk patients in a group with PPS through observation of tongue coating with systematic tongue analysis (STA).

Conclusions: Conclusion: STA identified, through the coating, a patient with worsening risk confirmed; and a patient with association of severe chronic diseases (her follow-up will be analyzed in a later work).

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Clinical neurological and tongue inspection according to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) – evaluation of post polio syndrome patients
Author: Abe, G.C., Ramos, P.E., da Silva, B.L., Quadros, A.J., Oliveira, A.S.B.
Affiliation: Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Neurologia e Neurocirurgia, São Paulo - SP, Brazil
Journal: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Citation: Volume 381, Supplement, 15 October 2017, Pages 199-200

Publication Year and Month: 2017 10

Abstract: Objective: To describe tongue characteristics of PPS patients relating to neurology.

RESULTS
89 individuals were evaluated within a 12 month period, 61 (68,5%) females, 28(31,5%)males, aged from 32–57 years old (mean = 46). The most frequent characteristics were: decreased moisture (52.5%); thick whitish coating (60.7%); red color (46,1%), and normal movement (49.4%). The enlarged size (40.4%) prevailed over the small/thin size (15.7%). The presence of “other findings” (OF) was over 70%.

Conclusions: Conclusion: The frequency of enlarged size associated to minor normal characteristics in OF and in tongue coating suggests that the group has a less marked impairment within the natural history of PPS.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Qigong on Cold Intolerance in Patients with Post-Poliomyelitis Syndrome
Author: Ramos, PS, Abe, GC, Pradella-Hallinan, M, Quadros, AAJ, Tao, T, Oliveira, ASB.
Affiliation: Federal University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TUTCM), Tianjin, China.
Department of Tuina and Orthopedics, Tuina and Orthopedics Clinic, The First Teaching Hospital, Tianjin, China.
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Scientific Research
2018 Vol1(1). DOI:10.4236/health.2017.101004
Publication Year and Month: 2018 01

Abstract: Post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) is a disorder in individuals who have had poliomyelitis, characterized by new muscle weakness and often associated with other symptoms, including cold intolerance (CI). Qigong is a Traditional Chinese Medicine technique to adjust energy and blood circulation. Objective: To verify the effects and late repercussions of Qigong on CI complaints in PPS patients. Methods: PPS patients (n = 22, 14 females, 8 males; ages 35 - 60) performed Qigong exercises in 40-minute sessions, three times per week, for three consecutive months. They were evaluated at baseline, the end of treatment and every three months for a year using a visual analogue scale adapted for CI (VAS-cold). Results: The systemic VAS-cold scores exhibited significant differences between the baseline, the end of treatment and throughout 12 months of follow-up. Conclusion: The CI scores were low and bearable at the end of intervention and for the following 12 months without activity.

Conclusions: We found that following DQ training, the complaints of CI exhibited statistically significant improvement in all the participants, and the sensitivity to cold exhibited low scores and bearable levels at the end of intervention and in the evaluations performed during the following 12 months.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Whole body vibration on people with sequelae of polio
Author: Da Silva CP, Szot CL, de Sa N.
Affiliation: School of Physical Therapy, Texas Woman's University, Houston, USA
Supported by the Post-polio Health International 2013–2014
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
Whole body vibration on people with sequelae of polio, Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, (2018). DOI: 10.1080/09593985.2018.1454559
Publication Year and Month: 2018 10

Abstract: Purpose: The purpose was to explore the feasibility of whole body vibration (WBV) on polio survivors with/without post-polio syndrome (PPS) by studying its effects on walking speed (10-m walk test), endurance (2-min walk test), pain severity/interference (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index), fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale), leg strength (manual muscle testing and hand-held dynamometry), and muscle cramping (written logs). Methods: Fifteen individuals completed the study, participating in eight sessions in two 4-week blocks. Participants started with ten 1-min vibration bouts/session, increasing to 20 min. Low (amplitude 4.53 mm, g force 2.21) and higher (amplitude 8.82 mm, g force 2.76) intensity blocked intervention occurred in random order crossover design. Blinded testing ensued before/after intervention blocks and at follow-up. Results: No study-related adverse events occurred. Participants starting first with higher intensity intervention improved in walking speed (p = 0.017). BPI pain severity significantly improved (p = 0.049) after higher intensity intervention. No significant changes were found after low intensity vibration or in other outcome measures. Conclusions: WBV appears to be a safe exercise for this population. Long-term use in polio survivors needs to be researched, particularly in reducing barriers to participation to promote the physical aspects of health.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Myofascial Release: Perspective of an informed consumer.
Author: DOROTHY WOODSMITH, RN, PHD,
Affiliation: UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MAINE, PORTLAND, MAINE
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Polio Network News, Winter 1997 Vol. 13 No.1
Publication Year and Month: 1997

Abstract: As the recipient of over 50 myofascial release treatments for my polio-related symptoms administered by Steven Moreau, MS, Pz I want to discuss the
topic from the perspective of an informed consumer.
I have paraphrased and quoted from materials
prepared by Moreau.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

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Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Efficacy of Oral Care Provided by Interprofessional Collaboration for a Patient with Esophageal Cancer Associated with Post-polio Syndrome during Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.
Author: Takahashi-Arimasa K, Kohno-Yamanaka R, Soga Y, Miura R, Morita M.
Affiliation: Dental Hygienist Team, Division of Medical Technology, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Acta Medica Okayama, Volume73 Issue1, 2019-02
Publication Year and Month: 2019 02

Abstract: Preoperative oral care is helpful to prevent postoperative complications in patients who are undergoing esophagectomy. Here, we report the case of an 81-year-old Japanese man with an upper limb disability caused by post-polio syndrome who was receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for esophageal cancer. He had poor oral health status and developed oral complications as a side effect of chemotherapy. He could not brush his teeth by himself. However, infection control by oral care provided by an interprofessional collaboration successfully improved his oral hygiene, and his follow-up involved no severe complications. Interprofessional collaboration is useful especially for patients with upper limb disability.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Pitting oedema in a polio survivor with lumbar radiculopathy complicated disc herniation
Author: Eric Chun Pu Chu, Aaron Ka Chun Chan, Andy Fu Chieh Lin
Affiliation: New York Chiropractic and Physiotherapy Center, New York Medical Group, Hong Kong, China
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. Volume : 8 | Issue : 5 | Page : 1765-1768
Publication Year and Month: 2019 05

Abstract: We report a 58-year-old male with sequelae of polio who presented with low back and left buttock pain, and pitting oedema of both legs for four months. The patient had a history of poliomyelitis at the age of 1 year which resulted in bilateral lower leg weakness, particularly on the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging showed cervical spinal stenosis secondary to posterior osteophyte formation, left paracentral disc extrusion at L2/L3 and L3/L4 levels with compression of the traversing L4 nerve root. The findings confirmed a diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy caused by a herniated disc. The patient subsequently underwent a chiropractic treatment. The painful symptoms and pitting oedema in this case resolved with spinal adjustment in addition to scraping therapy to strengthen bilateral low back and the gluteal muscles. This case provides circumstantial evidence of a scarcely mentioned association between pitting oedema and lumbar radiculopathy caused by disc herniation. The pathophysiological mechanism is elusive, but might involve a complexity of cytokine-mediated inflammation and interconnection between somatic and autonomic nervous systems.

Conclusions: This case provides circumstantial evidence of a scarcely mentioned association between pitting oedema and lumbar radiculopathy caused by disc herniation.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Complementary therapies aim to treat the whole person, not just the symptoms. These papers propose that polio survivors should have access to the treatments that they perceive as important. However, longitudinal data collection and clinical trials investigating the applications are required for ongoing patient care and education.

There are currently 10 papers in this category.

Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Pitting oedema in a polio survivor with lumbar radiculopathy complicated disc herniation
Author: Eric Chun Pu Chu, Aaron Ka Chun Chan, Andy Fu Chieh Lin
Affiliation: New York Chiropractic and Physiotherapy Center, New York Medical Group, Hong Kong, China
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. Volume : 8 | Issue : 5 | Page : 1765-1768
Publication Year and Month: 2019 05

Abstract: We report a 58-year-old male with sequelae of polio who presented with low back and left buttock pain, and pitting oedema of both legs for four months. The patient had a history of poliomyelitis at the age of 1 year which resulted in bilateral lower leg weakness, particularly on the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging showed cervical spinal stenosis secondary to posterior osteophyte formation, left paracentral disc extrusion at L2/L3 and L3/L4 levels with compression of the traversing L4 nerve root. The findings confirmed a diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy caused by a herniated disc. The patient subsequently underwent a chiropractic treatment. The painful symptoms and pitting oedema in this case resolved with spinal adjustment in addition to scraping therapy to strengthen bilateral low back and the gluteal muscles. This case provides circumstantial evidence of a scarcely mentioned association between pitting oedema and lumbar radiculopathy caused by disc herniation. The pathophysiological mechanism is elusive, but might involve a complexity of cytokine-mediated inflammation and interconnection between somatic and autonomic nervous systems.

Conclusions: This case provides circumstantial evidence of a scarcely mentioned association between pitting oedema and lumbar radiculopathy caused by disc herniation.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Efficacy of Oral Care Provided by Interprofessional Collaboration for a Patient with Esophageal Cancer Associated with Post-polio Syndrome during Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.
Author: Takahashi-Arimasa K, Kohno-Yamanaka R, Soga Y, Miura R, Morita M.
Affiliation: Dental Hygienist Team, Division of Medical Technology, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama 700-8558, Japan.
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Acta Medica Okayama, Volume73 Issue1, 2019-02
Publication Year and Month: 2019 02

Abstract: Preoperative oral care is helpful to prevent postoperative complications in patients who are undergoing esophagectomy. Here, we report the case of an 81-year-old Japanese man with an upper limb disability caused by post-polio syndrome who was receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for esophageal cancer. He had poor oral health status and developed oral complications as a side effect of chemotherapy. He could not brush his teeth by himself. However, infection control by oral care provided by an interprofessional collaboration successfully improved his oral hygiene, and his follow-up involved no severe complications. Interprofessional collaboration is useful especially for patients with upper limb disability.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Whole body vibration on people with sequelae of polio
Author: Da Silva CP, Szot CL, de Sa N.
Affiliation: School of Physical Therapy, Texas Woman's University, Houston, USA
Supported by the Post-polio Health International 2013–2014
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
Whole body vibration on people with sequelae of polio, Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, (2018). DOI: 10.1080/09593985.2018.1454559
Publication Year and Month: 2018 10

Abstract: Purpose: The purpose was to explore the feasibility of whole body vibration (WBV) on polio survivors with/without post-polio syndrome (PPS) by studying its effects on walking speed (10-m walk test), endurance (2-min walk test), pain severity/interference (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index), fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale), leg strength (manual muscle testing and hand-held dynamometry), and muscle cramping (written logs). Methods: Fifteen individuals completed the study, participating in eight sessions in two 4-week blocks. Participants started with ten 1-min vibration bouts/session, increasing to 20 min. Low (amplitude 4.53 mm, g force 2.21) and higher (amplitude 8.82 mm, g force 2.76) intensity blocked intervention occurred in random order crossover design. Blinded testing ensued before/after intervention blocks and at follow-up. Results: No study-related adverse events occurred. Participants starting first with higher intensity intervention improved in walking speed (p = 0.017). BPI pain severity significantly improved (p = 0.049) after higher intensity intervention. No significant changes were found after low intensity vibration or in other outcome measures. Conclusions: WBV appears to be a safe exercise for this population. Long-term use in polio survivors needs to be researched, particularly in reducing barriers to participation to promote the physical aspects of health.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Immediate and Long-Term Effects of Qigong on Cold Intolerance in Patients with Post-Poliomyelitis Syndrome
Author: Ramos, PS, Abe, GC, Pradella-Hallinan, M, Quadros, AAJ, Tao, T, Oliveira, ASB.
Affiliation: Federal University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TUTCM), Tianjin, China.
Department of Tuina and Orthopedics, Tuina and Orthopedics Clinic, The First Teaching Hospital, Tianjin, China.
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Scientific Research
2018 Vol1(1). DOI:10.4236/health.2017.101004
Publication Year and Month: 2018 01

Abstract: Post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) is a disorder in individuals who have had poliomyelitis, characterized by new muscle weakness and often associated with other symptoms, including cold intolerance (CI). Qigong is a Traditional Chinese Medicine technique to adjust energy and blood circulation. Objective: To verify the effects and late repercussions of Qigong on CI complaints in PPS patients. Methods: PPS patients (n = 22, 14 females, 8 males; ages 35 - 60) performed Qigong exercises in 40-minute sessions, three times per week, for three consecutive months. They were evaluated at baseline, the end of treatment and every three months for a year using a visual analogue scale adapted for CI (VAS-cold). Results: The systemic VAS-cold scores exhibited significant differences between the baseline, the end of treatment and throughout 12 months of follow-up. Conclusion: The CI scores were low and bearable at the end of intervention and for the following 12 months without activity.

Conclusions: We found that following DQ training, the complaints of CI exhibited statistically significant improvement in all the participants, and the sensitivity to cold exhibited low scores and bearable levels at the end of intervention and in the evaluations performed during the following 12 months.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Risk assessment and prognostic in patients with post polio syndrome according to systematic tongue analysis adapted from traditional Chinese medicine
Author: Abe, G.C., Ramos, P.E. da Silva, B.L., Mello, C.A.D.S., Quadros, A.A.J., Oliveira, A.S.B.
Affiliation: Federal University of São Paulo, Neurology and Neurosurgery, São Paulo, Brazil
Journal: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Citation: Volume 381, Supplement, 15 October 2017, Pages 1138-1139

Publication Year and Month: 2017 10

Abstract: Background: The tongue is used in traditional Chinese medicine for prognostic assessment. Muscle weakness, fatigue, pain and other symptoms occur with great variability in post polio syndrome (PPS).

Objective: Identify risk patients in a group with PPS through observation of tongue coating with systematic tongue analysis (STA).

Conclusions: Conclusion: STA identified, through the coating, a patient with worsening risk confirmed; and a patient with association of severe chronic diseases (her follow-up will be analyzed in a later work).

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Clinical neurological and tongue inspection according to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) – evaluation of post polio syndrome patients
Author: Abe, G.C., Ramos, P.E., da Silva, B.L., Quadros, A.J., Oliveira, A.S.B.
Affiliation: Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Neurologia e Neurocirurgia, São Paulo - SP, Brazil
Journal: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Citation: Volume 381, Supplement, 15 October 2017, Pages 199-200

Publication Year and Month: 2017 10

Abstract: Objective: To describe tongue characteristics of PPS patients relating to neurology.

RESULTS
89 individuals were evaluated within a 12 month period, 61 (68,5%) females, 28(31,5%)males, aged from 32–57 years old (mean = 46). The most frequent characteristics were: decreased moisture (52.5%); thick whitish coating (60.7%); red color (46,1%), and normal movement (49.4%). The enlarged size (40.4%) prevailed over the small/thin size (15.7%). The presence of “other findings” (OF) was over 70%.

Conclusions: Conclusion: The frequency of enlarged size associated to minor normal characteristics in OF and in tongue coating suggests that the group has a less marked impairment within the natural history of PPS.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: A randomized controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 for fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis
Author: Peel MM (1), Cooke M (1), Lewis-Peel HJ (1), Lea RA (2), Moyle W (1)
Affiliation: (1) NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Nursing Interventions, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia; (2) Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia
Journal: Complementary Therapies in Medicine
Citation: Complementary Therapies in Medicine 23 (2015), pp. 789-793; DOI information: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.09.002

Publication Year and Month: 2015 12

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine if coenzyme Q10 alleviates fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

DESIGN: Parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

BACKGROUND SETTING: Coenzyme Q10 has been shown to boost muscle energy metabolism in post-polio subjects but it does not promote muscle strength, endurance or function in polio survivors with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. However, the collective increased energy metabolism might contribute to a reduction in post-polio fatigue.

PARTICIPANTS: Polio survivors from the Australian post-polio networks in Queensland and New South Wales who attribute a moderate to high level of fatigue to their diagnosed late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Those with fatigue-associated comorbidities of diabetes, anaemia, hypothyroidism and fibromyalgia were excluded.

METHOD: Participants were assigned (1:1), with stratification of those who use energy-saving mobility aids, to receive 100 mg coenzyme Q10 or matching placebo daily for 60 days. Participants and investigators were blinded to group allocation. Fatigue was assessed by the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue as the primary outcome and the Fatigue Severity Scale as secondary outcome.

RESULTS: Of 103 participants, 54 were assigned to receive coenzyme Q10 and 49 to receive the placebo. The difference in the mean score reductions between the two groups was not statistically significant for either fatigue measure. Oral supplementation with coenzyme Q10 was safe and well-tolerated.

The registration number for the clinical trial is ACTRN 12612000552886.

Conclusions: A daily dose of 100 mg coenzyme Q10 for 60 days does not alleviate the fatigue of the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any): The results of this trial were found to be inconclusive.

Separately, a review on muscle pain associated with statin medication (reference below) discussed the challenges differentiating muscle pain, eliciting changes at the mitochondria (“powerhouse” of muscle cells) from Co-enzyme Q10 and the interactions diet can have in producing the changes. Interestingly, the author also questioned the dosage often used in studies of 100mg (including this one) may not be sufficient to create the change from the supplement. This highlights the need for further research, and potentially re-visiting previous studies that looked at co-enzyme Q10 supplementation.
Taylor, BA. Does Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Mitigate Statin-Associated Muscle Symptoms? Pharmacological and Methodological Considerations. Am J Cardiovasc Drugs. 2018;18(2):75-82.

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Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: No Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Training on Muscle Strength and Gait Performance in Persons With Late Effects of Polio: A Pilot Study
Author: Brogardh C, Flansbjer U-B, Lexell J.
Affiliation: Skane University Hospital
Lund University
Lulea University of Technology
Journal: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Citation: Volume 91, Issue 9, September 2010, Pages 1474-1477
Publication Year and Month: 2010 09

Abstract: Objective
To evaluate the feasibility and possible effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on muscle strength and gait performance in people with late effects of polio.

Design
A case-controlled pilot study with assessments before and after training.

Setting
A university hospital rehabilitation department.

Participants
People (N=5; 3 men, 2 women; mean age, 64±6.7y; range, 55−71y) with clinically and electrophysiologically verified late effects of polio.

Interventions
All participants underwent 10 sessions of supervised WBV training (standing with knees flexed 40°−55° up to 60 seconds per repetition and 10 repetitions per session twice weekly for 5 weeks).

Main Outcome Measures
Isokinetic and isometric knee muscle strength (dynamometer), and gait performance (Timed Up & Go, Comfortable Gait Speed, Fast Gait Speed, and six-minute walk tests).

Results
All participants completed the 5 weeks of WBV training, with no discernible discomfort. No significant changes in knee muscle strength or gait performance were found after the WBV training period.

Conclusions: This pilot study did not show any significant improvements in knee muscle strength and gait performance following a standard protocol of WBV training. Thus, the results do not lend support to WBV training for people with late effects of polio.

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome
Author: DeMayo W, Singh B, Duryea B, Riley D
Affiliation: Southern California University of the Health Sciences, USA
Journal: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Citation: Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2):24-5
Publication Year and Month: 2004 03

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract. The following is an extract:
Conemaugh Health System has completed a preliminary outcome study evaluating the benefits of Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome (PPS). This research integrates clinical trials investigating the application of Hatha yoga with ongoing patient care and education. The results of this clinical trial will be used to develop a longitudinal data collection effort integrating research and clinical trials investigating the applications of Hatha yoga in ongoing patient care and education.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Myofascial Release: Perspective of an informed consumer.
Author: DOROTHY WOODSMITH, RN, PHD,
Affiliation: UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MAINE, PORTLAND, MAINE
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Polio Network News, Winter 1997 Vol. 13 No.1
Publication Year and Month: 1997

Abstract: As the recipient of over 50 myofascial release treatments for my polio-related symptoms administered by Steven Moreau, MS, Pz I want to discuss the
topic from the perspective of an informed consumer.
I have paraphrased and quoted from materials
prepared by Moreau.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Complementary therapies aim to treat the whole person, not just the symptoms. These papers propose that polio survivors should have access to the treatments that they perceive as important. However, longitudinal data collection and clinical trials investigating the applications are required for ongoing patient care and education.

There are currently 10 papers in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications