Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Dysphagia and dysphonia among persons with post-polio syndrome – a challenge in neurorehabilitation
Author: Söderholm S, Lehtinen A, Valtonen K, Ylinen A
Affiliation: Käpylä Rehabilitation Centre, Finnish Association of People with Mobility Disabilities, Helsinki, Finland
Journal: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Citation: Acta Neurol Scand. 2010 Nov; 122(5):343–349. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2009.01315.x
Publication Year and Month: 2010 11

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To study the occurrence of dysphagia and dysphonia in persons with post-polio syndrome admitted into the centre for neurological rehabilitation in Finland.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:  Fifty-one persons with post-polio syndrome who were rehabilitated at Käpylä Rehabilitation Centre, Helsinki, Finland, in 2003–2004 were interviewed on problems with swallowing and voice production. Pulmonary function testing and grip strength measurement were performed. A clinical assessment of oral motor and laryngeal functions was carried out for those who reported daily problems with voice production or swallowing.

RESULTS: Fifteen persons (29.4%) reported daily problems with swallowing or voice production. In the clinical assessment, the most commonly observed deficits in swallowing included decreased pharyngeal transit (n = 13) and the food catching in the throat (n = 4). The disturbance of co-ordination of breathing and voice production was seen in 12 persons. There were no significant differences in any of the potential predictors between the groups.

Conclusions: Professionals need to be aware of the routine evaluation of dysphagia and dysphonia in patients with post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Evaluation, treatment, and follow-up results of post polio patients with dysphagia
Author: Silbergleit AK, Waring WP, Sullivan MJ, Maynard FM
Affiliation: Department of Physical Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Journal: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Citation: Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1991 Mar;104(3):333-8
Publication Year and Month: 1991 03

Abstract: Twenty consecutive patients were evaluated for reports of dysphagia from post-polio clinics. Only half the patients reported a history of swallowing problems at the time of their acute poliomyelitis. Each patient received a videofluorographic evaluation of the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing, and then was provided with recommendations to improve swallowing skills. A follow-up questionnaire was sent to all patients. The respondents had an average interval of 12 months since the initial evaluation. Of the 18 patients responding to the questionnaire, 14 (77%) reported regular use of the swallowing suggestions. Comparison of pre-evaluation results to followup of the 18 respondents yielded a statistically significant decline in the frequency of choking (p = 0.0156) and food sticking in the throat (p = 0.0195). We conclude that a dysphagia program can result in significant improvement of the swallowing symptoms reported with the post-polio population.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Incidence and nature of dysphagia in polio survivors
Author: Coelho CA, Ferranti R
Affiliation: Department of Communication Disorders, Gaylord Hospital, Wallingford, CT 06492
Journal: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Citation: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1991 Dec; 72(13):1071-5
Publication Year and Month: 1991 12

Abstract: Questionnaires pertaining to swallowing function were mailed to 220 members of postpolio support groups in Connecticut. Of the 109 responses, 80 individuals reported having no difficulty with swallowing, while 29 reported having either intermittent or consistent swallowing problems. Twenty-one of the 29 were seen for videofluoroscopic swallowing studies and pulmonary function testing. The swallowing studies showed that 43% of these individuals had difficulty with bolus control, 19% with delayed swallow response, and 81% with decreased pharyngeal transit. Although none of these individuals were observed to aspirate, two were judged to be at significant risk. Incidence of dysphagia within the group of polio survivors was estimated to be approximately 18%. Seventeen of the 20 postpolio subjects with dysphagia also demonstrated decreased breathing capacity. Although moderately to severely depressed values in the pulmonary function measures accompanied moderate dysphagia in certain postpolio individuals, reduced values in these same measures were also present in individuals with minimal swallowing dysfunction. Therefore, although impaired breathing may complicate swallowing dysfunction and vice versa, it does not appear that one can be predicated from the other. Management of dysphagia in postpolio individuals is discussed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Myasthenia gravis masquerading as post-poliomyelitis syndrome
Author: Singh R, Pentland B
Affiliation: Rehabilitation Medicine Unit, Astley Ainslie Hospital, Edinburgh, UK - [email protected]
Journal: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: J Rehabil Med. 2006 Mar;38(2):136-7
Publication Year and Month: 2006 03

Abstract: A 79-year-old man with previous bulbar poliomyelitis developed dysphagia and was diagnosed as having post-polio syndrome. Over 2 years, his swallowing deteriorated and he suffered an aspiration pneumonia. Only after the subsequent development of fatigue and facial weakness was myasthenia gravis diagnosed. Diagnostic criteria for post-polio syndrome include the exclusion of all other neurological conditions such as myasthenia gravis. Moreover, in any instance where a patient develops new symptoms, it is advisable to reconsider the original diagnosis.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable.

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Otolaryngology manifestation of postpolio syndrome
Author: Baugh RF
Affiliation: Not Stated
Journal: Journal of the National Medical Association
Citation: J Natl Med Assoc. 1993 Sep;85(9):689-91
Publication Year and Month: 1993 09

Abstract: Twenty-one patients with postpolio syndrome were surveyed to determine otolaryngologic symptoms. An alteration in voice, dysphagia, and fatigue were the most common symptoms reported. Prevailing etiologic theories are presented, and treatment recommendations are offered.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable.

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to download


There are currently 5 papers in this category.

Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Otolaryngology manifestation of postpolio syndrome
Author: Baugh RF
Affiliation: Not Stated
Journal: Journal of the National Medical Association
Citation: J Natl Med Assoc. 1993 Sep;85(9):689-91
Publication Year and Month: 1993 09

Abstract: Twenty-one patients with postpolio syndrome were surveyed to determine otolaryngologic symptoms. An alteration in voice, dysphagia, and fatigue were the most common symptoms reported. Prevailing etiologic theories are presented, and treatment recommendations are offered.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable.

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to download


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Incidence and nature of dysphagia in polio survivors
Author: Coelho CA, Ferranti R
Affiliation: Department of Communication Disorders, Gaylord Hospital, Wallingford, CT 06492
Journal: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Citation: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1991 Dec; 72(13):1071-5
Publication Year and Month: 1991 12

Abstract: Questionnaires pertaining to swallowing function were mailed to 220 members of postpolio support groups in Connecticut. Of the 109 responses, 80 individuals reported having no difficulty with swallowing, while 29 reported having either intermittent or consistent swallowing problems. Twenty-one of the 29 were seen for videofluoroscopic swallowing studies and pulmonary function testing. The swallowing studies showed that 43% of these individuals had difficulty with bolus control, 19% with delayed swallow response, and 81% with decreased pharyngeal transit. Although none of these individuals were observed to aspirate, two were judged to be at significant risk. Incidence of dysphagia within the group of polio survivors was estimated to be approximately 18%. Seventeen of the 20 postpolio subjects with dysphagia also demonstrated decreased breathing capacity. Although moderately to severely depressed values in the pulmonary function measures accompanied moderate dysphagia in certain postpolio individuals, reduced values in these same measures were also present in individuals with minimal swallowing dysfunction. Therefore, although impaired breathing may complicate swallowing dysfunction and vice versa, it does not appear that one can be predicated from the other. Management of dysphagia in postpolio individuals is discussed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Evaluation, treatment, and follow-up results of post polio patients with dysphagia
Author: Silbergleit AK, Waring WP, Sullivan MJ, Maynard FM
Affiliation: Department of Physical Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Journal: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Citation: Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1991 Mar;104(3):333-8
Publication Year and Month: 1991 03

Abstract: Twenty consecutive patients were evaluated for reports of dysphagia from post-polio clinics. Only half the patients reported a history of swallowing problems at the time of their acute poliomyelitis. Each patient received a videofluorographic evaluation of the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing, and then was provided with recommendations to improve swallowing skills. A follow-up questionnaire was sent to all patients. The respondents had an average interval of 12 months since the initial evaluation. Of the 18 patients responding to the questionnaire, 14 (77%) reported regular use of the swallowing suggestions. Comparison of pre-evaluation results to followup of the 18 respondents yielded a statistically significant decline in the frequency of choking (p = 0.0156) and food sticking in the throat (p = 0.0195). We conclude that a dysphagia program can result in significant improvement of the swallowing symptoms reported with the post-polio population.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Myasthenia gravis masquerading as post-poliomyelitis syndrome
Author: Singh R, Pentland B
Affiliation: Rehabilitation Medicine Unit, Astley Ainslie Hospital, Edinburgh, UK - [email protected]
Journal: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: J Rehabil Med. 2006 Mar;38(2):136-7
Publication Year and Month: 2006 03

Abstract: A 79-year-old man with previous bulbar poliomyelitis developed dysphagia and was diagnosed as having post-polio syndrome. Over 2 years, his swallowing deteriorated and he suffered an aspiration pneumonia. Only after the subsequent development of fatigue and facial weakness was myasthenia gravis diagnosed. Diagnostic criteria for post-polio syndrome include the exclusion of all other neurological conditions such as myasthenia gravis. Moreover, in any instance where a patient develops new symptoms, it is advisable to reconsider the original diagnosis.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable.

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Dysphagia and dysphonia among persons with post-polio syndrome – a challenge in neurorehabilitation
Author: Söderholm S, Lehtinen A, Valtonen K, Ylinen A
Affiliation: Käpylä Rehabilitation Centre, Finnish Association of People with Mobility Disabilities, Helsinki, Finland
Journal: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Citation: Acta Neurol Scand. 2010 Nov; 122(5):343–349. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2009.01315.x
Publication Year and Month: 2010 11

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To study the occurrence of dysphagia and dysphonia in persons with post-polio syndrome admitted into the centre for neurological rehabilitation in Finland.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:  Fifty-one persons with post-polio syndrome who were rehabilitated at Käpylä Rehabilitation Centre, Helsinki, Finland, in 2003–2004 were interviewed on problems with swallowing and voice production. Pulmonary function testing and grip strength measurement were performed. A clinical assessment of oral motor and laryngeal functions was carried out for those who reported daily problems with voice production or swallowing.

RESULTS: Fifteen persons (29.4%) reported daily problems with swallowing or voice production. In the clinical assessment, the most commonly observed deficits in swallowing included decreased pharyngeal transit (n = 13) and the food catching in the throat (n = 4). The disturbance of co-ordination of breathing and voice production was seen in 12 persons. There were no significant differences in any of the potential predictors between the groups.

Conclusions: Professionals need to be aware of the routine evaluation of dysphagia and dysphonia in patients with post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There are currently 5 papers in this category.

Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Dysphagia and dysphonia among persons with post-polio syndrome – a challenge in neurorehabilitation
Author: Söderholm S, Lehtinen A, Valtonen K, Ylinen A
Affiliation: Käpylä Rehabilitation Centre, Finnish Association of People with Mobility Disabilities, Helsinki, Finland
Journal: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Citation: Acta Neurol Scand. 2010 Nov; 122(5):343–349. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2009.01315.x
Publication Year and Month: 2010 11

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To study the occurrence of dysphagia and dysphonia in persons with post-polio syndrome admitted into the centre for neurological rehabilitation in Finland.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:  Fifty-one persons with post-polio syndrome who were rehabilitated at Käpylä Rehabilitation Centre, Helsinki, Finland, in 2003–2004 were interviewed on problems with swallowing and voice production. Pulmonary function testing and grip strength measurement were performed. A clinical assessment of oral motor and laryngeal functions was carried out for those who reported daily problems with voice production or swallowing.

RESULTS: Fifteen persons (29.4%) reported daily problems with swallowing or voice production. In the clinical assessment, the most commonly observed deficits in swallowing included decreased pharyngeal transit (n = 13) and the food catching in the throat (n = 4). The disturbance of co-ordination of breathing and voice production was seen in 12 persons. There were no significant differences in any of the potential predictors between the groups.

Conclusions: Professionals need to be aware of the routine evaluation of dysphagia and dysphonia in patients with post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Incidence and nature of dysphagia in polio survivors
Author: Coelho CA, Ferranti R
Affiliation: Department of Communication Disorders, Gaylord Hospital, Wallingford, CT 06492
Journal: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Citation: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1991 Dec; 72(13):1071-5
Publication Year and Month: 1991 12

Abstract: Questionnaires pertaining to swallowing function were mailed to 220 members of postpolio support groups in Connecticut. Of the 109 responses, 80 individuals reported having no difficulty with swallowing, while 29 reported having either intermittent or consistent swallowing problems. Twenty-one of the 29 were seen for videofluoroscopic swallowing studies and pulmonary function testing. The swallowing studies showed that 43% of these individuals had difficulty with bolus control, 19% with delayed swallow response, and 81% with decreased pharyngeal transit. Although none of these individuals were observed to aspirate, two were judged to be at significant risk. Incidence of dysphagia within the group of polio survivors was estimated to be approximately 18%. Seventeen of the 20 postpolio subjects with dysphagia also demonstrated decreased breathing capacity. Although moderately to severely depressed values in the pulmonary function measures accompanied moderate dysphagia in certain postpolio individuals, reduced values in these same measures were also present in individuals with minimal swallowing dysfunction. Therefore, although impaired breathing may complicate swallowing dysfunction and vice versa, it does not appear that one can be predicated from the other. Management of dysphagia in postpolio individuals is discussed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Myasthenia gravis masquerading as post-poliomyelitis syndrome
Author: Singh R, Pentland B
Affiliation: Rehabilitation Medicine Unit, Astley Ainslie Hospital, Edinburgh, UK - [email protected]
Journal: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: J Rehabil Med. 2006 Mar;38(2):136-7
Publication Year and Month: 2006 03

Abstract: A 79-year-old man with previous bulbar poliomyelitis developed dysphagia and was diagnosed as having post-polio syndrome. Over 2 years, his swallowing deteriorated and he suffered an aspiration pneumonia. Only after the subsequent development of fatigue and facial weakness was myasthenia gravis diagnosed. Diagnostic criteria for post-polio syndrome include the exclusion of all other neurological conditions such as myasthenia gravis. Moreover, in any instance where a patient develops new symptoms, it is advisable to reconsider the original diagnosis.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable.

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Otolaryngology manifestation of postpolio syndrome
Author: Baugh RF
Affiliation: Not Stated
Journal: Journal of the National Medical Association
Citation: J Natl Med Assoc. 1993 Sep;85(9):689-91
Publication Year and Month: 1993 09

Abstract: Twenty-one patients with postpolio syndrome were surveyed to determine otolaryngologic symptoms. An alteration in voice, dysphagia, and fatigue were the most common symptoms reported. Prevailing etiologic theories are presented, and treatment recommendations are offered.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable.

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to download


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Evaluation, treatment, and follow-up results of post polio patients with dysphagia
Author: Silbergleit AK, Waring WP, Sullivan MJ, Maynard FM
Affiliation: Department of Physical Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Journal: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Citation: Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1991 Mar;104(3):333-8
Publication Year and Month: 1991 03

Abstract: Twenty consecutive patients were evaluated for reports of dysphagia from post-polio clinics. Only half the patients reported a history of swallowing problems at the time of their acute poliomyelitis. Each patient received a videofluorographic evaluation of the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing, and then was provided with recommendations to improve swallowing skills. A follow-up questionnaire was sent to all patients. The respondents had an average interval of 12 months since the initial evaluation. Of the 18 patients responding to the questionnaire, 14 (77%) reported regular use of the swallowing suggestions. Comparison of pre-evaluation results to followup of the 18 respondents yielded a statistically significant decline in the frequency of choking (p = 0.0156) and food sticking in the throat (p = 0.0195). We conclude that a dysphagia program can result in significant improvement of the swallowing symptoms reported with the post-polio population.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


There are currently 5 papers in this category.

Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Dysphagia and dysphonia among persons with post-polio syndrome – a challenge in neurorehabilitation
Author: Söderholm S, Lehtinen A, Valtonen K, Ylinen A
Affiliation: Käpylä Rehabilitation Centre, Finnish Association of People with Mobility Disabilities, Helsinki, Finland
Journal: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Citation: Acta Neurol Scand. 2010 Nov; 122(5):343–349. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2009.01315.x
Publication Year and Month: 2010 11

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To study the occurrence of dysphagia and dysphonia in persons with post-polio syndrome admitted into the centre for neurological rehabilitation in Finland.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:  Fifty-one persons with post-polio syndrome who were rehabilitated at Käpylä Rehabilitation Centre, Helsinki, Finland, in 2003–2004 were interviewed on problems with swallowing and voice production. Pulmonary function testing and grip strength measurement were performed. A clinical assessment of oral motor and laryngeal functions was carried out for those who reported daily problems with voice production or swallowing.

RESULTS: Fifteen persons (29.4%) reported daily problems with swallowing or voice production. In the clinical assessment, the most commonly observed deficits in swallowing included decreased pharyngeal transit (n = 13) and the food catching in the throat (n = 4). The disturbance of co-ordination of breathing and voice production was seen in 12 persons. There were no significant differences in any of the potential predictors between the groups.

Conclusions: Professionals need to be aware of the routine evaluation of dysphagia and dysphonia in patients with post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Myasthenia gravis masquerading as post-poliomyelitis syndrome
Author: Singh R, Pentland B
Affiliation: Rehabilitation Medicine Unit, Astley Ainslie Hospital, Edinburgh, UK - [email protected]
Journal: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: J Rehabil Med. 2006 Mar;38(2):136-7
Publication Year and Month: 2006 03

Abstract: A 79-year-old man with previous bulbar poliomyelitis developed dysphagia and was diagnosed as having post-polio syndrome. Over 2 years, his swallowing deteriorated and he suffered an aspiration pneumonia. Only after the subsequent development of fatigue and facial weakness was myasthenia gravis diagnosed. Diagnostic criteria for post-polio syndrome include the exclusion of all other neurological conditions such as myasthenia gravis. Moreover, in any instance where a patient develops new symptoms, it is advisable to reconsider the original diagnosis.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable.

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Otolaryngology manifestation of postpolio syndrome
Author: Baugh RF
Affiliation: Not Stated
Journal: Journal of the National Medical Association
Citation: J Natl Med Assoc. 1993 Sep;85(9):689-91
Publication Year and Month: 1993 09

Abstract: Twenty-one patients with postpolio syndrome were surveyed to determine otolaryngologic symptoms. An alteration in voice, dysphagia, and fatigue were the most common symptoms reported. Prevailing etiologic theories are presented, and treatment recommendations are offered.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable.

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to download


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Incidence and nature of dysphagia in polio survivors
Author: Coelho CA, Ferranti R
Affiliation: Department of Communication Disorders, Gaylord Hospital, Wallingford, CT 06492
Journal: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Citation: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1991 Dec; 72(13):1071-5
Publication Year and Month: 1991 12

Abstract: Questionnaires pertaining to swallowing function were mailed to 220 members of postpolio support groups in Connecticut. Of the 109 responses, 80 individuals reported having no difficulty with swallowing, while 29 reported having either intermittent or consistent swallowing problems. Twenty-one of the 29 were seen for videofluoroscopic swallowing studies and pulmonary function testing. The swallowing studies showed that 43% of these individuals had difficulty with bolus control, 19% with delayed swallow response, and 81% with decreased pharyngeal transit. Although none of these individuals were observed to aspirate, two were judged to be at significant risk. Incidence of dysphagia within the group of polio survivors was estimated to be approximately 18%. Seventeen of the 20 postpolio subjects with dysphagia also demonstrated decreased breathing capacity. Although moderately to severely depressed values in the pulmonary function measures accompanied moderate dysphagia in certain postpolio individuals, reduced values in these same measures were also present in individuals with minimal swallowing dysfunction. Therefore, although impaired breathing may complicate swallowing dysfunction and vice versa, it does not appear that one can be predicated from the other. Management of dysphagia in postpolio individuals is discussed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


Category: Speech Pathology

Title: Evaluation, treatment, and follow-up results of post polio patients with dysphagia
Author: Silbergleit AK, Waring WP, Sullivan MJ, Maynard FM
Affiliation: Department of Physical Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Journal: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Citation: Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1991 Mar;104(3):333-8
Publication Year and Month: 1991 03

Abstract: Twenty consecutive patients were evaluated for reports of dysphagia from post-polio clinics. Only half the patients reported a history of swallowing problems at the time of their acute poliomyelitis. Each patient received a videofluorographic evaluation of the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing, and then was provided with recommendations to improve swallowing skills. A follow-up questionnaire was sent to all patients. The respondents had an average interval of 12 months since the initial evaluation. Of the 18 patients responding to the questionnaire, 14 (77%) reported regular use of the swallowing suggestions. Comparison of pre-evaluation results to followup of the 18 respondents yielded a statistically significant decline in the frequency of choking (p = 0.0156) and food sticking in the throat (p = 0.0195). We conclude that a dysphagia program can result in significant improvement of the swallowing symptoms reported with the post-polio population.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


There are currently 5 papers in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications