Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Assistive Technology, Quality of Life

Title: Assistive technology and prediction of happiness in people with post-polio syndrome
Author: Spiliotopoulou G, Fowkes C, Atwal A
Affiliation: Brunel University, School of Health Sciences and Social Care , Uxbridge, UB8 3PH , UK
Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation
Citation: Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2012 May;7(3):199-204. doi: 10.3109/17483107.2011.616921. Epub 2011 Oct 6
Publication Year and Month: 2012 05

Abstract: PURPOSE: To explore the relationship between level of happiness in people with post-polio syndrome (PPS) and assistive technology (AT) by taking into account confounding factors such as age, gender and house composition.

METHOD: Existing data from 218 adults with PPS, who had completed a cross-sectional survey conducted by the British Polio Fellowship in 2007, were used for a secondary quantitative analysis. Ordinal logistic regression was applied to determine whether ownership of or the need for AT predicted happiness in people with PPS.

RESULTS: Ownership of AT did not predict happiness, whereas the perceived need for AT was a significant predictor of feeling less happy (p = 0.028). Among the different types of AT needed, only need of home adaptations combined with major equipment was close to being significantly associated with less happiness (p = 0.078). Being older (p < 0.001) and living with a partner (p < 0.001) significantly increased the likelihood of feeling happier.

Conclusions: The findings indicate the importance of the contribution of need for AT in explaining happiness in people with PPS. The fact that users reported unmet equipment needs urge for increased user decision making and better understanding of why perceived needs are not resolved.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Assistive Technology, Late Effects of Polio

Title: Coping with a Second Disability: Implications of the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Occupational Therapists
Author: Mary Westbrook, Lynette McDowell
Affiliation: Macquarie University, Sydney. Australia
Journal: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
Citation: 38(2):83 - 91
Publication Year and Month: 2010 08

Abstract: The long term effects of many physical disabilities have only recently begun to be appreciated. For people who have lived for years with what they thought to be stable conditions, the onset of secondary disabilities may be associated with considerable problems and distress. A questionnaire survey of 324 people with poliomyelitis revealed the occurrence of late effects in 94% of respondents. The majority reported increased weakness, pain and fatigue, problems in carrying out daily living activities and difficulties in obtaining appropriate health care. Although occupational therapists were less likely to be consulted than other professionals, they received one of the highest satisfaction ratings from clients.

Conclusions: Discussion of case studies indicates ways in which occupational therapists can provide symptom relief and enable clients to maintain valued roles. As the survival rates of people with disabilities increase there is a need for greater awareness of, and research into, the late effects of disability.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Assistive Technology, Orthoses

Title: Evaluation of gait symmetry in poliomyelitis subjects: Comparison of a conventional knee-ankle-foot orthosis and a new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis
Author: Arazpour M (1), Ahmadi F (2), Bahramizadeh M (2), Samadian M (3), Mousavi ME (2), Bani MA (4), Hutchins SW (5)
Affiliation: (1) Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; (2) Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; (3) Loghman Hakim Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; (4) Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; (5) Institute of Health & Social Care Research (IHSCR), Faculty of Health & Social Care, University of Salford, Manchester, Salford, UK
Journal: Prosthetics and Orthotics International
Citation: Prosthet Orthot Int. 2015 Aug 12. pii: 0309364615596063
Publication Year and Month: 2015 08

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Compared to able-bodied subjects, subjects with post-polio syndrome and poliomyelitis demonstrate a preference for weight-bearing on the non-paretic limb, causing gait asymmetry.

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gait symmetry of the poliomyelitis subjects when ambulating with either a drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis or a newly developed powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

STUDY DESIGN: Quasi experimental study.

METHODS: Seven subjects with poliomyelitis who routinely wore conventional knee-ankle-foot orthoses participated in this study and received training to enable them to ambulate with the powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis on level ground, prior to gait analysis.

RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the gait symmetry index of step length (p = 0.085), stance time (p = 0.082), double-limb support time (p = 0.929), or speed of walking (p = 0.325) between the two test conditions. However, using the new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis improved the symmetry index in step width (p = 0.037), swing time (p = 0.014), stance phase percentage (p = 0.008), and knee flexion during swing phase (p ⩽ 0.001) compared to wearing the drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

Conclusions: The use of a powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis for ambulation by poliomyelitis subjects affects gait symmetry in the base of support, swing time, stance phase percentage, and knee flexion during swing phase.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis can improve gait symmetry for poliomyelitis subjects by influencing step width, swing time, stance time percentage, and knee flexion during swing phase when compared to ambulating with a drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Assistive Technology

Title: Evaluation of Motor-Assisted Gloves (SEM Glove) for Patients with Functional Finger Disorders: a clinical pilot study
Author: RYUKI HASHIDA, HIROO MATSUSE, MASAFUMI BEKKI, MASAYUKI OMOTO, SHIMPEI MORIMOTO, TOMOKO HINO, YUUJI HARANO, CHIKAHIRO IWASA, KAZUKI MIYAMOTO, MASAKUNI HARAGUCHI, TAKESHI NAGO, NAOTO SHIBA
Affiliation: Division of Rehabilitation, Kurume University Hospital, Kurume 830-0011, Japan,
Department of Orthopedics, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume 830-0011, Japan,

Innovation Platform & Office for Precision Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences,
Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8501 Japan
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Kurume Medical Journal, 65, 00-00, 2018
Publication Year and Month: 2018

Abstract: Summary: The SEM Glove developed by Bioservo Technologies AB is a new device that increases grip and
pinch force. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the device on the grip and pinch
strength of patients with functional disorders of the fingers.
Materials and Method: 30 hospitalized patients with upper limb functional disorder were enrolled. The assistance
of the device for the grip and pinch strength of each subject were assessed by the difference between the measured values with and without the SEM Glove. The 95% confidence interval of the difference was calculated
across the subjects, and statistical significance was defined as when the lower limit was a positive value (corresponding with a paired t-test at a significance level of 0.05). The odds ratio was calculated in the study of subject
adaptation, with statistical significance set using Fisher’s exact test at a significance level of 0.05.
Results: Grip strength significantly decreased (worn-not worn difference (kg): mean = –3.7, CI95 (–5.4, –2.1)).
Pinch strength (thumb - middle finger) significantly increased (worn-not worn difference (N): mean = -4.1, CI95
(1.6, 6.6)). Analysis of factors related to improvement in hand function when wearing the SEM Glove extracted
manual muscle tests (MMTs) of the upper extremity 4 or higher. The odds ratio was 6.11.

Conclusions: Conclusions: Use of the SEM Glove improved the pinch strength of patients with functional disorders of the hands.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Assistive Technology

Title: Mobility and participation among ageing powered wheelchair users: using a lifecourse approach
Author: Delphine Labbé, W. Ben Mortenson, Paula W. Rushton, Louise Demers, and William C. Miller
Affiliation: Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Rehabilitation Research Lab, Vancouver, Canada
Department of Gerontology, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
CHU Sainte Justine Research Center, Montréal, Canada
Centre de recherche de l'institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Ageing and Society, 1-17.
Publication Year and Month: 2018 09

Abstract: About 65 million people use wheelchairs worldwide. Powered wheelchairs offer independent mobility for those who find it difficult to propel a manual wheelchair. Previous studies have described powered wheelchairs as a mixed blessing for the users in terms of usability, accessibility, safety, cost and stigma; however, few studies have explored their impact on mobility and participation over time. Therefore, as part of a larger longitudinal study, we used a combined retrospective and prospective lifecourse perspective to explore the experiences of older adult powered wheelchair users. Based on the interpretive description approach, 19 participants took part in a series of semi-structured interviews over a two-year period about their mobility, social participation and ageing process. The participants were powered wheelchair users, at least 50 years of age, recruited in Vancouver, Montreal and Quebec City (Canada). We identified three themes that highlighted how the powered wheelchair experience was integrated into the life continuum of the users. ‘It's my legs’ emphasised how powered wheelchairs are a form of mobility that not only enables users to take part in activities, but also impacts their identities, past and present. ‘Wheels of change’ explored the dynamic nature of powered wheelchair use and changes related to ageing. ‘Getting around’ illustrated how users’ mobility was affected by the interaction with their physical and social environments.

Conclusions: Developing public policies to advance social and environmental changes could help countries to ensure equity of access and social inclusion of those ageing with disabilities.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Assistive Technology

Title: The extent of using mobility assistive devices can partly explain fatigue among persons with late effects of polio – a retrospective registry study in Sweden
Author: Santos Tavares SilvaEmail author, K. S. Sunnerhagen, C. Willén and I. Ottenvall Hammar
Affiliation:
Journal: BioMed Central Neurology
Citation:
Publication Year and Month: 2016 06

Abstract: Background
Fatigue is reported as one of the most disabling symptoms and is common among persons living with late effects of polio. Although fatigue has been studied in the context of people living with late effects of polio, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the association of fatigue and variables of importance for participation in daily life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore possible factors associated with fatigue among persons with late effects of polio in Sweden.

Methods
This retrospective registry study consisted of 89 persons with late effects of polio living in Sweden. Fatigue was measured with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) scale, Swedish version. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to analyse the correlation between the factors and fatigue, and a multiple linear regression was carried out to explore factors for fatigue.

Results
Fatigue statistically significantly correlated with age (r = 0.234, p < 0.05) and the use of mobility assistive devices (r = 0.255, p < 0.05). The multiple linear regression model showed that the factors age (β = 0.304, p < 0.019) and mobility assistive devices (β = 0.262, p < 0.017) were associated with fatigue among persons living with late effects of polio, and the model partly explained 14% of the variation of fatigue.

Conclusions: Conclusions
Fatigue could partly be explained by the extent of using mobility assistive devices and age. Healthcare professionals should provide and demonstrate the importance of assistive devices to ensure management of fatigue in persons living with late effects of polio.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Assistive Technology, Orthoses

Title: Wearable monitoring devices for assistive technology: case studies in post-polio syndrome
Author: Andreoni G (1), Mazzola M (1), Perego P (1), Standoli CE (1), Manzoni S (1), Piccini L (2), Molteni F (3)
Affiliation: (1) Design Department, Politecnico di Milano, via G. Durando 38/A, Milan 20158, Italy; (2) 6SXT-Sistemi per Telemedicina s.r.l., via M. D'Oggiono 18/A, Lecco 23900, Italy; (3) Villa Beretta Rehabilitation Center, Valduce Hospital, Via N.Sauro, 17 - 23845 Costa Masnaga (LC), Italy
Journal: Sensors
Citation: Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jan 24;14(2):2012-27. doi: 10.3390/s140202012
Publication Year and Month: 2014 01

Abstract: The correct choice and customization of an orthosis are crucial to obtain the best comfort and efficiency. This study explored the feasibility of a multivariate quantitative assessment of the functional efficiency of lower limb orthosis through a novel wearable system. Gait basographic parameters and energetic indexes were analysed during a Six-Minute Walking Test (6-MWT) through a cost-effective, non-invasive polygraph device, with a multichannel wireless transmission, that carried out electro-cardiograph (ECG); impedance-cardiograph (ICG); and lower-limb accelerations detection. Four subjects affected by Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS) were recruited. The wearable device and the semi-automatic post-processing software provided a novel set of objective data to assess the overall efficiency of the patient-orthosis system. Despite the small number of examined subjects, the results obtained with this new approach encourage the application of the method thus enlarging the dataset to validate this promising protocol and measuring system in supporting clinical decisions and out of a laboratory environment.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


There are currently 7 papers in this category.

Category: Assistive Technology, Orthoses

Title: Wearable monitoring devices for assistive technology: case studies in post-polio syndrome
Author: Andreoni G (1), Mazzola M (1), Perego P (1), Standoli CE (1), Manzoni S (1), Piccini L (2), Molteni F (3)
Affiliation: (1) Design Department, Politecnico di Milano, via G. Durando 38/A, Milan 20158, Italy; (2) 6SXT-Sistemi per Telemedicina s.r.l., via M. D'Oggiono 18/A, Lecco 23900, Italy; (3) Villa Beretta Rehabilitation Center, Valduce Hospital, Via N.Sauro, 17 - 23845 Costa Masnaga (LC), Italy
Journal: Sensors
Citation: Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jan 24;14(2):2012-27. doi: 10.3390/s140202012
Publication Year and Month: 2014 01

Abstract: The correct choice and customization of an orthosis are crucial to obtain the best comfort and efficiency. This study explored the feasibility of a multivariate quantitative assessment of the functional efficiency of lower limb orthosis through a novel wearable system. Gait basographic parameters and energetic indexes were analysed during a Six-Minute Walking Test (6-MWT) through a cost-effective, non-invasive polygraph device, with a multichannel wireless transmission, that carried out electro-cardiograph (ECG); impedance-cardiograph (ICG); and lower-limb accelerations detection. Four subjects affected by Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS) were recruited. The wearable device and the semi-automatic post-processing software provided a novel set of objective data to assess the overall efficiency of the patient-orthosis system. Despite the small number of examined subjects, the results obtained with this new approach encourage the application of the method thus enlarging the dataset to validate this promising protocol and measuring system in supporting clinical decisions and out of a laboratory environment.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Assistive Technology, Orthoses

Title: Evaluation of gait symmetry in poliomyelitis subjects: Comparison of a conventional knee-ankle-foot orthosis and a new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis
Author: Arazpour M (1), Ahmadi F (2), Bahramizadeh M (2), Samadian M (3), Mousavi ME (2), Bani MA (4), Hutchins SW (5)
Affiliation: (1) Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; (2) Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; (3) Loghman Hakim Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; (4) Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; (5) Institute of Health & Social Care Research (IHSCR), Faculty of Health & Social Care, University of Salford, Manchester, Salford, UK
Journal: Prosthetics and Orthotics International
Citation: Prosthet Orthot Int. 2015 Aug 12. pii: 0309364615596063
Publication Year and Month: 2015 08

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Compared to able-bodied subjects, subjects with post-polio syndrome and poliomyelitis demonstrate a preference for weight-bearing on the non-paretic limb, causing gait asymmetry.

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gait symmetry of the poliomyelitis subjects when ambulating with either a drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis or a newly developed powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

STUDY DESIGN: Quasi experimental study.

METHODS: Seven subjects with poliomyelitis who routinely wore conventional knee-ankle-foot orthoses participated in this study and received training to enable them to ambulate with the powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis on level ground, prior to gait analysis.

RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the gait symmetry index of step length (p = 0.085), stance time (p = 0.082), double-limb support time (p = 0.929), or speed of walking (p = 0.325) between the two test conditions. However, using the new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis improved the symmetry index in step width (p = 0.037), swing time (p = 0.014), stance phase percentage (p = 0.008), and knee flexion during swing phase (p ⩽ 0.001) compared to wearing the drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

Conclusions: The use of a powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis for ambulation by poliomyelitis subjects affects gait symmetry in the base of support, swing time, stance phase percentage, and knee flexion during swing phase.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis can improve gait symmetry for poliomyelitis subjects by influencing step width, swing time, stance time percentage, and knee flexion during swing phase when compared to ambulating with a drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Assistive Technology

Title: Mobility and participation among ageing powered wheelchair users: using a lifecourse approach
Author: Delphine Labbé, W. Ben Mortenson, Paula W. Rushton, Louise Demers, and William C. Miller
Affiliation: Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Rehabilitation Research Lab, Vancouver, Canada
Department of Gerontology, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
CHU Sainte Justine Research Center, Montréal, Canada
Centre de recherche de l'institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Ageing and Society, 1-17.
Publication Year and Month: 2018 09

Abstract: About 65 million people use wheelchairs worldwide. Powered wheelchairs offer independent mobility for those who find it difficult to propel a manual wheelchair. Previous studies have described powered wheelchairs as a mixed blessing for the users in terms of usability, accessibility, safety, cost and stigma; however, few studies have explored their impact on mobility and participation over time. Therefore, as part of a larger longitudinal study, we used a combined retrospective and prospective lifecourse perspective to explore the experiences of older adult powered wheelchair users. Based on the interpretive description approach, 19 participants took part in a series of semi-structured interviews over a two-year period about their mobility, social participation and ageing process. The participants were powered wheelchair users, at least 50 years of age, recruited in Vancouver, Montreal and Quebec City (Canada). We identified three themes that highlighted how the powered wheelchair experience was integrated into the life continuum of the users. ‘It's my legs’ emphasised how powered wheelchairs are a form of mobility that not only enables users to take part in activities, but also impacts their identities, past and present. ‘Wheels of change’ explored the dynamic nature of powered wheelchair use and changes related to ageing. ‘Getting around’ illustrated how users’ mobility was affected by the interaction with their physical and social environments.

Conclusions: Developing public policies to advance social and environmental changes could help countries to ensure equity of access and social inclusion of those ageing with disabilities.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Assistive Technology, Late Effects of Polio

Title: Coping with a Second Disability: Implications of the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Occupational Therapists
Author: Mary Westbrook, Lynette McDowell
Affiliation: Macquarie University, Sydney. Australia
Journal: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
Citation: 38(2):83 - 91
Publication Year and Month: 2010 08

Abstract: The long term effects of many physical disabilities have only recently begun to be appreciated. For people who have lived for years with what they thought to be stable conditions, the onset of secondary disabilities may be associated with considerable problems and distress. A questionnaire survey of 324 people with poliomyelitis revealed the occurrence of late effects in 94% of respondents. The majority reported increased weakness, pain and fatigue, problems in carrying out daily living activities and difficulties in obtaining appropriate health care. Although occupational therapists were less likely to be consulted than other professionals, they received one of the highest satisfaction ratings from clients.

Conclusions: Discussion of case studies indicates ways in which occupational therapists can provide symptom relief and enable clients to maintain valued roles. As the survival rates of people with disabilities increase there is a need for greater awareness of, and research into, the late effects of disability.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Assistive Technology

Title: Evaluation of Motor-Assisted Gloves (SEM Glove) for Patients with Functional Finger Disorders: a clinical pilot study
Author: RYUKI HASHIDA, HIROO MATSUSE, MASAFUMI BEKKI, MASAYUKI OMOTO, SHIMPEI MORIMOTO, TOMOKO HINO, YUUJI HARANO, CHIKAHIRO IWASA, KAZUKI MIYAMOTO, MASAKUNI HARAGUCHI, TAKESHI NAGO, NAOTO SHIBA
Affiliation: Division of Rehabilitation, Kurume University Hospital, Kurume 830-0011, Japan,
Department of Orthopedics, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume 830-0011, Japan,

Innovation Platform & Office for Precision Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences,
Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8501 Japan
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Kurume Medical Journal, 65, 00-00, 2018
Publication Year and Month: 2018

Abstract: Summary: The SEM Glove developed by Bioservo Technologies AB is a new device that increases grip and
pinch force. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the device on the grip and pinch
strength of patients with functional disorders of the fingers.
Materials and Method: 30 hospitalized patients with upper limb functional disorder were enrolled. The assistance
of the device for the grip and pinch strength of each subject were assessed by the difference between the measured values with and without the SEM Glove. The 95% confidence interval of the difference was calculated
across the subjects, and statistical significance was defined as when the lower limit was a positive value (corresponding with a paired t-test at a significance level of 0.05). The odds ratio was calculated in the study of subject
adaptation, with statistical significance set using Fisher’s exact test at a significance level of 0.05.
Results: Grip strength significantly decreased (worn-not worn difference (kg): mean = –3.7, CI95 (–5.4, –2.1)).
Pinch strength (thumb - middle finger) significantly increased (worn-not worn difference (N): mean = -4.1, CI95
(1.6, 6.6)). Analysis of factors related to improvement in hand function when wearing the SEM Glove extracted
manual muscle tests (MMTs) of the upper extremity 4 or higher. The odds ratio was 6.11.

Conclusions: Conclusions: Use of the SEM Glove improved the pinch strength of patients with functional disorders of the hands.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Assistive Technology

Title: The extent of using mobility assistive devices can partly explain fatigue among persons with late effects of polio – a retrospective registry study in Sweden
Author: Santos Tavares SilvaEmail author, K. S. Sunnerhagen, C. Willén and I. Ottenvall Hammar
Affiliation:
Journal: BioMed Central Neurology
Citation:
Publication Year and Month: 2016 06

Abstract: Background
Fatigue is reported as one of the most disabling symptoms and is common among persons living with late effects of polio. Although fatigue has been studied in the context of people living with late effects of polio, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the association of fatigue and variables of importance for participation in daily life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore possible factors associated with fatigue among persons with late effects of polio in Sweden.

Methods
This retrospective registry study consisted of 89 persons with late effects of polio living in Sweden. Fatigue was measured with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) scale, Swedish version. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to analyse the correlation between the factors and fatigue, and a multiple linear regression was carried out to explore factors for fatigue.

Results
Fatigue statistically significantly correlated with age (r = 0.234, p < 0.05) and the use of mobility assistive devices (r = 0.255, p < 0.05). The multiple linear regression model showed that the factors age (β = 0.304, p < 0.019) and mobility assistive devices (β = 0.262, p < 0.017) were associated with fatigue among persons living with late effects of polio, and the model partly explained 14% of the variation of fatigue.

Conclusions: Conclusions
Fatigue could partly be explained by the extent of using mobility assistive devices and age. Healthcare professionals should provide and demonstrate the importance of assistive devices to ensure management of fatigue in persons living with late effects of polio.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Assistive Technology, Quality of Life

Title: Assistive technology and prediction of happiness in people with post-polio syndrome
Author: Spiliotopoulou G, Fowkes C, Atwal A
Affiliation: Brunel University, School of Health Sciences and Social Care , Uxbridge, UB8 3PH , UK
Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation
Citation: Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2012 May;7(3):199-204. doi: 10.3109/17483107.2011.616921. Epub 2011 Oct 6
Publication Year and Month: 2012 05

Abstract: PURPOSE: To explore the relationship between level of happiness in people with post-polio syndrome (PPS) and assistive technology (AT) by taking into account confounding factors such as age, gender and house composition.

METHOD: Existing data from 218 adults with PPS, who had completed a cross-sectional survey conducted by the British Polio Fellowship in 2007, were used for a secondary quantitative analysis. Ordinal logistic regression was applied to determine whether ownership of or the need for AT predicted happiness in people with PPS.

RESULTS: Ownership of AT did not predict happiness, whereas the perceived need for AT was a significant predictor of feeling less happy (p = 0.028). Among the different types of AT needed, only need of home adaptations combined with major equipment was close to being significantly associated with less happiness (p = 0.078). Being older (p < 0.001) and living with a partner (p < 0.001) significantly increased the likelihood of feeling happier.

Conclusions: The findings indicate the importance of the contribution of need for AT in explaining happiness in people with PPS. The fact that users reported unmet equipment needs urge for increased user decision making and better understanding of why perceived needs are not resolved.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There are currently 7 papers in this category.

Category: Assistive Technology, Late Effects of Polio

Title: Coping with a Second Disability: Implications of the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Occupational Therapists
Author: Mary Westbrook, Lynette McDowell
Affiliation: Macquarie University, Sydney. Australia
Journal: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
Citation: 38(2):83 - 91
Publication Year and Month: 2010 08

Abstract: The long term effects of many physical disabilities have only recently begun to be appreciated. For people who have lived for years with what they thought to be stable conditions, the onset of secondary disabilities may be associated with considerable problems and distress. A questionnaire survey of 324 people with poliomyelitis revealed the occurrence of late effects in 94% of respondents. The majority reported increased weakness, pain and fatigue, problems in carrying out daily living activities and difficulties in obtaining appropriate health care. Although occupational therapists were less likely to be consulted than other professionals, they received one of the highest satisfaction ratings from clients.

Conclusions: Discussion of case studies indicates ways in which occupational therapists can provide symptom relief and enable clients to maintain valued roles. As the survival rates of people with disabilities increase there is a need for greater awareness of, and research into, the late effects of disability.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Assistive Technology

Title: The extent of using mobility assistive devices can partly explain fatigue among persons with late effects of polio – a retrospective registry study in Sweden
Author: Santos Tavares SilvaEmail author, K. S. Sunnerhagen, C. Willén and I. Ottenvall Hammar
Affiliation:
Journal: BioMed Central Neurology
Citation:
Publication Year and Month: 2016 06

Abstract: Background
Fatigue is reported as one of the most disabling symptoms and is common among persons living with late effects of polio. Although fatigue has been studied in the context of people living with late effects of polio, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the association of fatigue and variables of importance for participation in daily life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore possible factors associated with fatigue among persons with late effects of polio in Sweden.

Methods
This retrospective registry study consisted of 89 persons with late effects of polio living in Sweden. Fatigue was measured with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) scale, Swedish version. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to analyse the correlation between the factors and fatigue, and a multiple linear regression was carried out to explore factors for fatigue.

Results
Fatigue statistically significantly correlated with age (r = 0.234, p < 0.05) and the use of mobility assistive devices (r = 0.255, p < 0.05). The multiple linear regression model showed that the factors age (β = 0.304, p < 0.019) and mobility assistive devices (β = 0.262, p < 0.017) were associated with fatigue among persons living with late effects of polio, and the model partly explained 14% of the variation of fatigue.

Conclusions: Conclusions
Fatigue could partly be explained by the extent of using mobility assistive devices and age. Healthcare professionals should provide and demonstrate the importance of assistive devices to ensure management of fatigue in persons living with late effects of polio.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Assistive Technology, Quality of Life

Title: Assistive technology and prediction of happiness in people with post-polio syndrome
Author: Spiliotopoulou G, Fowkes C, Atwal A
Affiliation: Brunel University, School of Health Sciences and Social Care , Uxbridge, UB8 3PH , UK
Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation
Citation: Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2012 May;7(3):199-204. doi: 10.3109/17483107.2011.616921. Epub 2011 Oct 6
Publication Year and Month: 2012 05

Abstract: PURPOSE: To explore the relationship between level of happiness in people with post-polio syndrome (PPS) and assistive technology (AT) by taking into account confounding factors such as age, gender and house composition.

METHOD: Existing data from 218 adults with PPS, who had completed a cross-sectional survey conducted by the British Polio Fellowship in 2007, were used for a secondary quantitative analysis. Ordinal logistic regression was applied to determine whether ownership of or the need for AT predicted happiness in people with PPS.

RESULTS: Ownership of AT did not predict happiness, whereas the perceived need for AT was a significant predictor of feeling less happy (p = 0.028). Among the different types of AT needed, only need of home adaptations combined with major equipment was close to being significantly associated with less happiness (p = 0.078). Being older (p < 0.001) and living with a partner (p < 0.001) significantly increased the likelihood of feeling happier.

Conclusions: The findings indicate the importance of the contribution of need for AT in explaining happiness in people with PPS. The fact that users reported unmet equipment needs urge for increased user decision making and better understanding of why perceived needs are not resolved.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

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Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Assistive Technology

Title: Mobility and participation among ageing powered wheelchair users: using a lifecourse approach
Author: Delphine Labbé, W. Ben Mortenson, Paula W. Rushton, Louise Demers, and William C. Miller
Affiliation: Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Rehabilitation Research Lab, Vancouver, Canada
Department of Gerontology, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
CHU Sainte Justine Research Center, Montréal, Canada
Centre de recherche de l'institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Ageing and Society, 1-17.
Publication Year and Month: 2018 09

Abstract: About 65 million people use wheelchairs worldwide. Powered wheelchairs offer independent mobility for those who find it difficult to propel a manual wheelchair. Previous studies have described powered wheelchairs as a mixed blessing for the users in terms of usability, accessibility, safety, cost and stigma; however, few studies have explored their impact on mobility and participation over time. Therefore, as part of a larger longitudinal study, we used a combined retrospective and prospective lifecourse perspective to explore the experiences of older adult powered wheelchair users. Based on the interpretive description approach, 19 participants took part in a series of semi-structured interviews over a two-year period about their mobility, social participation and ageing process. The participants were powered wheelchair users, at least 50 years of age, recruited in Vancouver, Montreal and Quebec City (Canada). We identified three themes that highlighted how the powered wheelchair experience was integrated into the life continuum of the users. ‘It's my legs’ emphasised how powered wheelchairs are a form of mobility that not only enables users to take part in activities, but also impacts their identities, past and present. ‘Wheels of change’ explored the dynamic nature of powered wheelchair use and changes related to ageing. ‘Getting around’ illustrated how users’ mobility was affected by the interaction with their physical and social environments.

Conclusions: Developing public policies to advance social and environmental changes could help countries to ensure equity of access and social inclusion of those ageing with disabilities.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Assistive Technology

Title: Evaluation of Motor-Assisted Gloves (SEM Glove) for Patients with Functional Finger Disorders: a clinical pilot study
Author: RYUKI HASHIDA, HIROO MATSUSE, MASAFUMI BEKKI, MASAYUKI OMOTO, SHIMPEI MORIMOTO, TOMOKO HINO, YUUJI HARANO, CHIKAHIRO IWASA, KAZUKI MIYAMOTO, MASAKUNI HARAGUCHI, TAKESHI NAGO, NAOTO SHIBA
Affiliation: Division of Rehabilitation, Kurume University Hospital, Kurume 830-0011, Japan,
Department of Orthopedics, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume 830-0011, Japan,

Innovation Platform & Office for Precision Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences,
Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8501 Japan
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Kurume Medical Journal, 65, 00-00, 2018
Publication Year and Month: 2018

Abstract: Summary: The SEM Glove developed by Bioservo Technologies AB is a new device that increases grip and
pinch force. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the device on the grip and pinch
strength of patients with functional disorders of the fingers.
Materials and Method: 30 hospitalized patients with upper limb functional disorder were enrolled. The assistance
of the device for the grip and pinch strength of each subject were assessed by the difference between the measured values with and without the SEM Glove. The 95% confidence interval of the difference was calculated
across the subjects, and statistical significance was defined as when the lower limit was a positive value (corresponding with a paired t-test at a significance level of 0.05). The odds ratio was calculated in the study of subject
adaptation, with statistical significance set using Fisher’s exact test at a significance level of 0.05.
Results: Grip strength significantly decreased (worn-not worn difference (kg): mean = –3.7, CI95 (–5.4, –2.1)).
Pinch strength (thumb - middle finger) significantly increased (worn-not worn difference (N): mean = -4.1, CI95
(1.6, 6.6)). Analysis of factors related to improvement in hand function when wearing the SEM Glove extracted
manual muscle tests (MMTs) of the upper extremity 4 or higher. The odds ratio was 6.11.

Conclusions: Conclusions: Use of the SEM Glove improved the pinch strength of patients with functional disorders of the hands.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Assistive Technology, Orthoses

Title: Evaluation of gait symmetry in poliomyelitis subjects: Comparison of a conventional knee-ankle-foot orthosis and a new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis
Author: Arazpour M (1), Ahmadi F (2), Bahramizadeh M (2), Samadian M (3), Mousavi ME (2), Bani MA (4), Hutchins SW (5)
Affiliation: (1) Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; (2) Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; (3) Loghman Hakim Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; (4) Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; (5) Institute of Health & Social Care Research (IHSCR), Faculty of Health & Social Care, University of Salford, Manchester, Salford, UK
Journal: Prosthetics and Orthotics International
Citation: Prosthet Orthot Int. 2015 Aug 12. pii: 0309364615596063
Publication Year and Month: 2015 08

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Compared to able-bodied subjects, subjects with post-polio syndrome and poliomyelitis demonstrate a preference for weight-bearing on the non-paretic limb, causing gait asymmetry.

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gait symmetry of the poliomyelitis subjects when ambulating with either a drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis or a newly developed powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

STUDY DESIGN: Quasi experimental study.

METHODS: Seven subjects with poliomyelitis who routinely wore conventional knee-ankle-foot orthoses participated in this study and received training to enable them to ambulate with the powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis on level ground, prior to gait analysis.

RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the gait symmetry index of step length (p = 0.085), stance time (p = 0.082), double-limb support time (p = 0.929), or speed of walking (p = 0.325) between the two test conditions. However, using the new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis improved the symmetry index in step width (p = 0.037), swing time (p = 0.014), stance phase percentage (p = 0.008), and knee flexion during swing phase (p ⩽ 0.001) compared to wearing the drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

Conclusions: The use of a powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis for ambulation by poliomyelitis subjects affects gait symmetry in the base of support, swing time, stance phase percentage, and knee flexion during swing phase.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis can improve gait symmetry for poliomyelitis subjects by influencing step width, swing time, stance time percentage, and knee flexion during swing phase when compared to ambulating with a drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Assistive Technology, Orthoses

Title: Wearable monitoring devices for assistive technology: case studies in post-polio syndrome
Author: Andreoni G (1), Mazzola M (1), Perego P (1), Standoli CE (1), Manzoni S (1), Piccini L (2), Molteni F (3)
Affiliation: (1) Design Department, Politecnico di Milano, via G. Durando 38/A, Milan 20158, Italy; (2) 6SXT-Sistemi per Telemedicina s.r.l., via M. D'Oggiono 18/A, Lecco 23900, Italy; (3) Villa Beretta Rehabilitation Center, Valduce Hospital, Via N.Sauro, 17 - 23845 Costa Masnaga (LC), Italy
Journal: Sensors
Citation: Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jan 24;14(2):2012-27. doi: 10.3390/s140202012
Publication Year and Month: 2014 01

Abstract: The correct choice and customization of an orthosis are crucial to obtain the best comfort and efficiency. This study explored the feasibility of a multivariate quantitative assessment of the functional efficiency of lower limb orthosis through a novel wearable system. Gait basographic parameters and energetic indexes were analysed during a Six-Minute Walking Test (6-MWT) through a cost-effective, non-invasive polygraph device, with a multichannel wireless transmission, that carried out electro-cardiograph (ECG); impedance-cardiograph (ICG); and lower-limb accelerations detection. Four subjects affected by Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS) were recruited. The wearable device and the semi-automatic post-processing software provided a novel set of objective data to assess the overall efficiency of the patient-orthosis system. Despite the small number of examined subjects, the results obtained with this new approach encourage the application of the method thus enlarging the dataset to validate this promising protocol and measuring system in supporting clinical decisions and out of a laboratory environment.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


There are currently 7 papers in this category.

Category: Assistive Technology

Title: Mobility and participation among ageing powered wheelchair users: using a lifecourse approach
Author: Delphine Labbé, W. Ben Mortenson, Paula W. Rushton, Louise Demers, and William C. Miller
Affiliation: Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Rehabilitation Research Lab, Vancouver, Canada
Department of Gerontology, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
CHU Sainte Justine Research Center, Montréal, Canada
Centre de recherche de l'institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Ageing and Society, 1-17.
Publication Year and Month: 2018 09

Abstract: About 65 million people use wheelchairs worldwide. Powered wheelchairs offer independent mobility for those who find it difficult to propel a manual wheelchair. Previous studies have described powered wheelchairs as a mixed blessing for the users in terms of usability, accessibility, safety, cost and stigma; however, few studies have explored their impact on mobility and participation over time. Therefore, as part of a larger longitudinal study, we used a combined retrospective and prospective lifecourse perspective to explore the experiences of older adult powered wheelchair users. Based on the interpretive description approach, 19 participants took part in a series of semi-structured interviews over a two-year period about their mobility, social participation and ageing process. The participants were powered wheelchair users, at least 50 years of age, recruited in Vancouver, Montreal and Quebec City (Canada). We identified three themes that highlighted how the powered wheelchair experience was integrated into the life continuum of the users. ‘It's my legs’ emphasised how powered wheelchairs are a form of mobility that not only enables users to take part in activities, but also impacts their identities, past and present. ‘Wheels of change’ explored the dynamic nature of powered wheelchair use and changes related to ageing. ‘Getting around’ illustrated how users’ mobility was affected by the interaction with their physical and social environments.

Conclusions: Developing public policies to advance social and environmental changes could help countries to ensure equity of access and social inclusion of those ageing with disabilities.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Assistive Technology

Title: Evaluation of Motor-Assisted Gloves (SEM Glove) for Patients with Functional Finger Disorders: a clinical pilot study
Author: RYUKI HASHIDA, HIROO MATSUSE, MASAFUMI BEKKI, MASAYUKI OMOTO, SHIMPEI MORIMOTO, TOMOKO HINO, YUUJI HARANO, CHIKAHIRO IWASA, KAZUKI MIYAMOTO, MASAKUNI HARAGUCHI, TAKESHI NAGO, NAOTO SHIBA
Affiliation: Division of Rehabilitation, Kurume University Hospital, Kurume 830-0011, Japan,
Department of Orthopedics, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume 830-0011, Japan,

Innovation Platform & Office for Precision Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences,
Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8501 Japan
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Kurume Medical Journal, 65, 00-00, 2018
Publication Year and Month: 2018

Abstract: Summary: The SEM Glove developed by Bioservo Technologies AB is a new device that increases grip and
pinch force. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the device on the grip and pinch
strength of patients with functional disorders of the fingers.
Materials and Method: 30 hospitalized patients with upper limb functional disorder were enrolled. The assistance
of the device for the grip and pinch strength of each subject were assessed by the difference between the measured values with and without the SEM Glove. The 95% confidence interval of the difference was calculated
across the subjects, and statistical significance was defined as when the lower limit was a positive value (corresponding with a paired t-test at a significance level of 0.05). The odds ratio was calculated in the study of subject
adaptation, with statistical significance set using Fisher’s exact test at a significance level of 0.05.
Results: Grip strength significantly decreased (worn-not worn difference (kg): mean = –3.7, CI95 (–5.4, –2.1)).
Pinch strength (thumb - middle finger) significantly increased (worn-not worn difference (N): mean = -4.1, CI95
(1.6, 6.6)). Analysis of factors related to improvement in hand function when wearing the SEM Glove extracted
manual muscle tests (MMTs) of the upper extremity 4 or higher. The odds ratio was 6.11.

Conclusions: Conclusions: Use of the SEM Glove improved the pinch strength of patients with functional disorders of the hands.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Assistive Technology

Title: The extent of using mobility assistive devices can partly explain fatigue among persons with late effects of polio – a retrospective registry study in Sweden
Author: Santos Tavares SilvaEmail author, K. S. Sunnerhagen, C. Willén and I. Ottenvall Hammar
Affiliation:
Journal: BioMed Central Neurology
Citation:
Publication Year and Month: 2016 06

Abstract: Background
Fatigue is reported as one of the most disabling symptoms and is common among persons living with late effects of polio. Although fatigue has been studied in the context of people living with late effects of polio, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the association of fatigue and variables of importance for participation in daily life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore possible factors associated with fatigue among persons with late effects of polio in Sweden.

Methods
This retrospective registry study consisted of 89 persons with late effects of polio living in Sweden. Fatigue was measured with the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) scale, Swedish version. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to analyse the correlation between the factors and fatigue, and a multiple linear regression was carried out to explore factors for fatigue.

Results
Fatigue statistically significantly correlated with age (r = 0.234, p < 0.05) and the use of mobility assistive devices (r = 0.255, p < 0.05). The multiple linear regression model showed that the factors age (β = 0.304, p < 0.019) and mobility assistive devices (β = 0.262, p < 0.017) were associated with fatigue among persons living with late effects of polio, and the model partly explained 14% of the variation of fatigue.

Conclusions: Conclusions
Fatigue could partly be explained by the extent of using mobility assistive devices and age. Healthcare professionals should provide and demonstrate the importance of assistive devices to ensure management of fatigue in persons living with late effects of polio.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Assistive Technology, Orthoses

Title: Evaluation of gait symmetry in poliomyelitis subjects: Comparison of a conventional knee-ankle-foot orthosis and a new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis
Author: Arazpour M (1), Ahmadi F (2), Bahramizadeh M (2), Samadian M (3), Mousavi ME (2), Bani MA (4), Hutchins SW (5)
Affiliation: (1) Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; (2) Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; (3) Loghman Hakim Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; (4) Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; (5) Institute of Health & Social Care Research (IHSCR), Faculty of Health & Social Care, University of Salford, Manchester, Salford, UK
Journal: Prosthetics and Orthotics International
Citation: Prosthet Orthot Int. 2015 Aug 12. pii: 0309364615596063
Publication Year and Month: 2015 08

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Compared to able-bodied subjects, subjects with post-polio syndrome and poliomyelitis demonstrate a preference for weight-bearing on the non-paretic limb, causing gait asymmetry.

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gait symmetry of the poliomyelitis subjects when ambulating with either a drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis or a newly developed powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

STUDY DESIGN: Quasi experimental study.

METHODS: Seven subjects with poliomyelitis who routinely wore conventional knee-ankle-foot orthoses participated in this study and received training to enable them to ambulate with the powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis on level ground, prior to gait analysis.

RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the gait symmetry index of step length (p = 0.085), stance time (p = 0.082), double-limb support time (p = 0.929), or speed of walking (p = 0.325) between the two test conditions. However, using the new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis improved the symmetry index in step width (p = 0.037), swing time (p = 0.014), stance phase percentage (p = 0.008), and knee flexion during swing phase (p ⩽ 0.001) compared to wearing the drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

Conclusions: The use of a powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis for ambulation by poliomyelitis subjects affects gait symmetry in the base of support, swing time, stance phase percentage, and knee flexion during swing phase.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A new powered knee-ankle-foot orthosis can improve gait symmetry for poliomyelitis subjects by influencing step width, swing time, stance time percentage, and knee flexion during swing phase when compared to ambulating with a drop-locked knee-ankle-foot orthosis.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Assistive Technology, Orthoses

Title: Wearable monitoring devices for assistive technology: case studies in post-polio syndrome
Author: Andreoni G (1), Mazzola M (1), Perego P (1), Standoli CE (1), Manzoni S (1), Piccini L (2), Molteni F (3)
Affiliation: (1) Design Department, Politecnico di Milano, via G. Durando 38/A, Milan 20158, Italy; (2) 6SXT-Sistemi per Telemedicina s.r.l., via M. D'Oggiono 18/A, Lecco 23900, Italy; (3) Villa Beretta Rehabilitation Center, Valduce Hospital, Via N.Sauro, 17 - 23845 Costa Masnaga (LC), Italy
Journal: Sensors
Citation: Sensors (Basel). 2014 Jan 24;14(2):2012-27. doi: 10.3390/s140202012
Publication Year and Month: 2014 01

Abstract: The correct choice and customization of an orthosis are crucial to obtain the best comfort and efficiency. This study explored the feasibility of a multivariate quantitative assessment of the functional efficiency of lower limb orthosis through a novel wearable system. Gait basographic parameters and energetic indexes were analysed during a Six-Minute Walking Test (6-MWT) through a cost-effective, non-invasive polygraph device, with a multichannel wireless transmission, that carried out electro-cardiograph (ECG); impedance-cardiograph (ICG); and lower-limb accelerations detection. Four subjects affected by Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS) were recruited. The wearable device and the semi-automatic post-processing software provided a novel set of objective data to assess the overall efficiency of the patient-orthosis system. Despite the small number of examined subjects, the results obtained with this new approach encourage the application of the method thus enlarging the dataset to validate this promising protocol and measuring system in supporting clinical decisions and out of a laboratory environment.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Assistive Technology, Quality of Life

Title: Assistive technology and prediction of happiness in people with post-polio syndrome
Author: Spiliotopoulou G, Fowkes C, Atwal A
Affiliation: Brunel University, School of Health Sciences and Social Care , Uxbridge, UB8 3PH , UK
Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation
Citation: Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2012 May;7(3):199-204. doi: 10.3109/17483107.2011.616921. Epub 2011 Oct 6
Publication Year and Month: 2012 05

Abstract: PURPOSE: To explore the relationship between level of happiness in people with post-polio syndrome (PPS) and assistive technology (AT) by taking into account confounding factors such as age, gender and house composition.

METHOD: Existing data from 218 adults with PPS, who had completed a cross-sectional survey conducted by the British Polio Fellowship in 2007, were used for a secondary quantitative analysis. Ordinal logistic regression was applied to determine whether ownership of or the need for AT predicted happiness in people with PPS.

RESULTS: Ownership of AT did not predict happiness, whereas the perceived need for AT was a significant predictor of feeling less happy (p = 0.028). Among the different types of AT needed, only need of home adaptations combined with major equipment was close to being significantly associated with less happiness (p = 0.078). Being older (p < 0.001) and living with a partner (p < 0.001) significantly increased the likelihood of feeling happier.

Conclusions: The findings indicate the importance of the contribution of need for AT in explaining happiness in people with PPS. The fact that users reported unmet equipment needs urge for increased user decision making and better understanding of why perceived needs are not resolved.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Assistive Technology, Late Effects of Polio

Title: Coping with a Second Disability: Implications of the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Occupational Therapists
Author: Mary Westbrook, Lynette McDowell
Affiliation: Macquarie University, Sydney. Australia
Journal: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
Citation: 38(2):83 - 91
Publication Year and Month: 2010 08

Abstract: The long term effects of many physical disabilities have only recently begun to be appreciated. For people who have lived for years with what they thought to be stable conditions, the onset of secondary disabilities may be associated with considerable problems and distress. A questionnaire survey of 324 people with poliomyelitis revealed the occurrence of late effects in 94% of respondents. The majority reported increased weakness, pain and fatigue, problems in carrying out daily living activities and difficulties in obtaining appropriate health care. Although occupational therapists were less likely to be consulted than other professionals, they received one of the highest satisfaction ratings from clients.

Conclusions: Discussion of case studies indicates ways in which occupational therapists can provide symptom relief and enable clients to maintain valued roles. As the survival rates of people with disabilities increase there is a need for greater awareness of, and research into, the late effects of disability.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


There are currently 7 papers in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications