Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Restless legs syndrome and post polio syndrome: a case−control study
Author: Romigi A (1,2), Pierantozzi M (3), Placidi F (1), Evangelista E (1), Albanese M (1)1, Liguori C (1), Nazzaro M (4), Risina BU (5), Simonelli V (6), Izzi F (1), Mercuri NB (1,7), Desiato MT (8)
Affiliation: (1) Neurophysiopathology Unit, Sleep Medicine Centre, Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; (2) IRCCS Neuromed Via Atinense 18, Pozzilli (IS), Italy; (3) Department of Neuroscience, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy; (4) UOC Governo Clinico in Riabilitazione Azienda Ospedaliera S. Camillo Forlanini, Rome, Italy; (5) Neuropsichiatra Infantile – Centro di Riabilitazione Vaclav Vojta, Rome, Italy; (6) UOC Neurologia Ospedale Monaldi – Napoli, Napoli, Italy; (7) IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; (8) Division of Neurophysiopathology, Sant'Eugenio Hospital, Rome, Italy
Journal: European Journal of Neurology
Citation: Eur J Neurol. 2015 Mar; 22(3):472-8. doi: 10.1111/ene.12593
Publication Year and Month: 2015 03

Abstract: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim was to investigate the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS), fatigue and daytime sleepiness in a large cohort of patients affected by post polio syndrome (PPS) and their impact on patient health-related quality of life (HRQoL) compared with healthy subjects.

METHODS: PPS patients were evaluated by means of the Stanford Sleepiness Scale and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). The Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire was utilized to assess HRQoL in PPS. RLS was diagnosed when standard criteria were met. Age and sex matched healthy controls were recruited amongst spouses or friends of PPS subjects.

RESULTS: A total of 66 PPS patients and 80 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. A significantly higher prevalence of RLS (P < 0.0005; odds ratio 21.5; 95% confidence interval 8.17–57) was found in PPS patients (PPS/RLS+ 63.6%) than in healthy controls (7.5%). The FSS score was higher in PPS/RLS+ than in PPS/RLS− patients (P = 0.03). A significant decrease of SF-36 scores, including the physical function (P = 0.001), physical role (P = 0.0001) and bodily pain (P = 0.03) domains, was found in PPS/RLS+ versus PPS/RLS− patients. Finally, it was found that PPS/RLS+ showed a significant correlation between International Restless Legs Scale score and FSS (P < 0.0001), as well as between International Restless Legs Scale score and most of the SF-36 items (physical role P = 0.0018, general health P = 0.0009, vitality P = 0.0022, social functioning P = 0.002, role emotional P = 0.0019, and mental health P = 0.0003).

Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate a high prevalence of RLS in PPS, and that RLS occurrence may significantly influence the HRQoL and fatigue of PPS patients. A hypothetical link between neuroanatomical and inflammatory mechanisms in RLS and PPS is suggested.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Restless legs syndrome in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis
Author: Kumru H (1), Portell E (2), Barrio M (2), Santamaria J (3)
Affiliation: (1) Institut Guttmann, Institut Universitari de Neurorehabilitació adscrit a la UAB, 08916 Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; Univ Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain; Fundació Institut d'Investigació en Ciències de la Salut Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; (2) Institut Guttmann, Institut Universitari de Neurorehabilitació adscrit a la UAB, 08916 Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; Univ Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain; Fundació Institut d'Investigació en Ciències de la Salut Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; (3) Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
Journal: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
Citation: Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2014 Oct;20(10):1056-8. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2014.06.014
Publication Year and Month: 2014 06

Abstract: BACKGROUND: No studies have examined the association between RLS and the sequelae of poliomyelitis (PM). We studied the frequency and severity of RLS in a group of consecutive patients with the sequelae of poliomyelitis (PM) and the effect of treatment with dopaminergic drugs.

METHODS: A diagnosis of RLS was made according to the criteria of the International RLS Study Group, and severity was assessed by the RLS rating scale. Information on sex, age, age at onset, site affected by PM, disease duration of PM, and history of post-polio syndrome (pPS) was obtained in a cohort of 52 PM patients.

RESULT: The mean age was 55.9 ± 6.5 years; 39 patients had post-polio syndrome (75%). RLS was diagnosed in 21 (40.4%) patients. Sixteen of the 21 patients (76.2%) with RLS had pPS, which was similar to the non-RLS group (74.2% patients with pPS). RLS symptoms were very severe in 5 patients, severe in 13, moderate in 2 and mild in 1. Nineteen of the 21 patients with RLS had symptoms predominantly in the more affected lower limb (90% of patients). Sixteen patients received dopaminergic agonist treatment with a significant reduction in their scores on the RLS severity scale from 28.3 ± 4.7 to 6.9 ± 7.3 (p < 0.001).

DISCUSSION: RLS occurs frequently in patients with PM, both in those with and without pPS, and responds well to treatment with dopaminergic drugs.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Effective

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Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome: a series of 10 patients with demographic, clinical and laboratorial findings
Author: Marin LF (1), Carvalho LB, Prado LB, Quadros AA, Oliveira AS, Prado GF
Affiliation: (1) Neuro-Sono Sleep Center, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Claudio Rossi 394, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. [email protected]
Journal: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
Citation: Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2011 Aug;17(7):563-4. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2011.02.011
Publication Year and Month: 2011 08

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Few studies have described the occurrence of restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome.

METHODS: We studied 10 consecutive patients with post-polio syndrome and symptoms of restless legs syndrome. We look at demographic, clinical and laboratorial data.

RESULTS: A remarkable finding was the concomitant onset of symptoms of both diseases, suggesting a possible underlying mechanism. Severity of restless legs symptoms was moderate to very severe.

Conclusions: Epidemiological studies with larger samples are needed to better establish the relationship and the incidence of restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Category: Restless Legs Syndrome, Sleep Analysis

Title: Sleep disorders frequency in post-polio syndrome patients caused by periodic limb movements
Author: Araujo MA de P (1); Silva TMe (2); Moreira GA (3); Pradella-Hallinan M (3); Tufik S (4); Oliveira ASB (4)
Affiliation: (1) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Master in Health Sciences; (2) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Specialized in neuromuscular diseases; (3) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Doctor in Sciences; (4) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Post Doctor in Sciences
Journal: Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria
Citation: Arq. Neuro-Psiquiatr. vol.68 no.1 São Paulo Feb. 2010. dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0004-282X2010000100008
Publication Year and Month: 2010 02

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) in individuals with polio longer than 15 years is characterized by weakness and/or muscle fatigue, deficit of deglutition and breath and periodic limb movements (PLM) during sleep. We undertook a review of 99 patients with PPS, and assessed the frequency of PLM through polysomnographic recordings at our sleep disorders unit. The total number of PLM, total time of sleep (TTS), efficiency of sleep (EfS), awaking index (AI) and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were analyzed. Sixteen patients presented PLM in excess of 5 for the entire night. When comparing these with the group without PLM, a correlation was found (p=0.001). Significant difference was found for the correlation of the parameters: IAH, ID, TTS and EfS when compared the two groups. There is a close relationship between PPS and PLM.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Sleep disorders frequency in post-polio syndrome patients caused by periodic limb movements
Author: Araujo MA (1), Silva TM, Moreira GA, Pradella-Hallinan M, Tufik S, Oliveira AS
Affiliation: (1) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil
Journal: Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria
Citation: Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2010 Feb;68(1):35-8.
Publication Year and Month: 2010 02

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) in individuals with polio longer than 15 years is characterized by weakness and/or muscle fatigue, deficit of deglutition and breath and periodic limb movements (PLM) during sleep. We undertook a review of 99 patients with PPS, and assessed the frequency of PLM through polysomnographic recordings at our sleep disorders unit. The total number of PLM, total time of sleep (TTS), efficiency of sleep (EfS), awaking index (AI) and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were analyzed. Sixteen patients presented PLM in excess of 5 for the entire night. When comparing these with the group without PLM, a correlation was found (p=0.001). Significant difference was found for the correlation of the parameters: IAH, ID, TTS and EfS when compared the two groups. There is a close relationship between PPS and PLM.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


There are currently 5 papers in this category.

Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Sleep disorders frequency in post-polio syndrome patients caused by periodic limb movements
Author: Araujo MA (1), Silva TM, Moreira GA, Pradella-Hallinan M, Tufik S, Oliveira AS
Affiliation: (1) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil
Journal: Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria
Citation: Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2010 Feb;68(1):35-8.
Publication Year and Month: 2010 02

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) in individuals with polio longer than 15 years is characterized by weakness and/or muscle fatigue, deficit of deglutition and breath and periodic limb movements (PLM) during sleep. We undertook a review of 99 patients with PPS, and assessed the frequency of PLM through polysomnographic recordings at our sleep disorders unit. The total number of PLM, total time of sleep (TTS), efficiency of sleep (EfS), awaking index (AI) and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were analyzed. Sixteen patients presented PLM in excess of 5 for the entire night. When comparing these with the group without PLM, a correlation was found (p=0.001). Significant difference was found for the correlation of the parameters: IAH, ID, TTS and EfS when compared the two groups. There is a close relationship between PPS and PLM.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Restless Legs Syndrome, Sleep Analysis

Title: Sleep disorders frequency in post-polio syndrome patients caused by periodic limb movements
Author: Araujo MA de P (1); Silva TMe (2); Moreira GA (3); Pradella-Hallinan M (3); Tufik S (4); Oliveira ASB (4)
Affiliation: (1) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Master in Health Sciences; (2) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Specialized in neuromuscular diseases; (3) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Doctor in Sciences; (4) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Post Doctor in Sciences
Journal: Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria
Citation: Arq. Neuro-Psiquiatr. vol.68 no.1 São Paulo Feb. 2010. dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0004-282X2010000100008
Publication Year and Month: 2010 02

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) in individuals with polio longer than 15 years is characterized by weakness and/or muscle fatigue, deficit of deglutition and breath and periodic limb movements (PLM) during sleep. We undertook a review of 99 patients with PPS, and assessed the frequency of PLM through polysomnographic recordings at our sleep disorders unit. The total number of PLM, total time of sleep (TTS), efficiency of sleep (EfS), awaking index (AI) and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were analyzed. Sixteen patients presented PLM in excess of 5 for the entire night. When comparing these with the group without PLM, a correlation was found (p=0.001). Significant difference was found for the correlation of the parameters: IAH, ID, TTS and EfS when compared the two groups. There is a close relationship between PPS and PLM.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Restless legs syndrome in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis
Author: Kumru H (1), Portell E (2), Barrio M (2), Santamaria J (3)
Affiliation: (1) Institut Guttmann, Institut Universitari de Neurorehabilitació adscrit a la UAB, 08916 Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; Univ Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain; Fundació Institut d'Investigació en Ciències de la Salut Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; (2) Institut Guttmann, Institut Universitari de Neurorehabilitació adscrit a la UAB, 08916 Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; Univ Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain; Fundació Institut d'Investigació en Ciències de la Salut Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; (3) Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
Journal: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
Citation: Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2014 Oct;20(10):1056-8. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2014.06.014
Publication Year and Month: 2014 06

Abstract: BACKGROUND: No studies have examined the association between RLS and the sequelae of poliomyelitis (PM). We studied the frequency and severity of RLS in a group of consecutive patients with the sequelae of poliomyelitis (PM) and the effect of treatment with dopaminergic drugs.

METHODS: A diagnosis of RLS was made according to the criteria of the International RLS Study Group, and severity was assessed by the RLS rating scale. Information on sex, age, age at onset, site affected by PM, disease duration of PM, and history of post-polio syndrome (pPS) was obtained in a cohort of 52 PM patients.

RESULT: The mean age was 55.9 ± 6.5 years; 39 patients had post-polio syndrome (75%). RLS was diagnosed in 21 (40.4%) patients. Sixteen of the 21 patients (76.2%) with RLS had pPS, which was similar to the non-RLS group (74.2% patients with pPS). RLS symptoms were very severe in 5 patients, severe in 13, moderate in 2 and mild in 1. Nineteen of the 21 patients with RLS had symptoms predominantly in the more affected lower limb (90% of patients). Sixteen patients received dopaminergic agonist treatment with a significant reduction in their scores on the RLS severity scale from 28.3 ± 4.7 to 6.9 ± 7.3 (p < 0.001).

DISCUSSION: RLS occurs frequently in patients with PM, both in those with and without pPS, and responds well to treatment with dopaminergic drugs.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome: a series of 10 patients with demographic, clinical and laboratorial findings
Author: Marin LF (1), Carvalho LB, Prado LB, Quadros AA, Oliveira AS, Prado GF
Affiliation: (1) Neuro-Sono Sleep Center, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Claudio Rossi 394, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. [email protected]
Journal: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
Citation: Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2011 Aug;17(7):563-4. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2011.02.011
Publication Year and Month: 2011 08

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Few studies have described the occurrence of restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome.

METHODS: We studied 10 consecutive patients with post-polio syndrome and symptoms of restless legs syndrome. We look at demographic, clinical and laboratorial data.

RESULTS: A remarkable finding was the concomitant onset of symptoms of both diseases, suggesting a possible underlying mechanism. Severity of restless legs symptoms was moderate to very severe.

Conclusions: Epidemiological studies with larger samples are needed to better establish the relationship and the incidence of restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Restless legs syndrome and post polio syndrome: a case−control study
Author: Romigi A (1,2), Pierantozzi M (3), Placidi F (1), Evangelista E (1), Albanese M (1)1, Liguori C (1), Nazzaro M (4), Risina BU (5), Simonelli V (6), Izzi F (1), Mercuri NB (1,7), Desiato MT (8)
Affiliation: (1) Neurophysiopathology Unit, Sleep Medicine Centre, Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; (2) IRCCS Neuromed Via Atinense 18, Pozzilli (IS), Italy; (3) Department of Neuroscience, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy; (4) UOC Governo Clinico in Riabilitazione Azienda Ospedaliera S. Camillo Forlanini, Rome, Italy; (5) Neuropsichiatra Infantile – Centro di Riabilitazione Vaclav Vojta, Rome, Italy; (6) UOC Neurologia Ospedale Monaldi – Napoli, Napoli, Italy; (7) IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; (8) Division of Neurophysiopathology, Sant'Eugenio Hospital, Rome, Italy
Journal: European Journal of Neurology
Citation: Eur J Neurol. 2015 Mar; 22(3):472-8. doi: 10.1111/ene.12593
Publication Year and Month: 2015 03

Abstract: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim was to investigate the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS), fatigue and daytime sleepiness in a large cohort of patients affected by post polio syndrome (PPS) and their impact on patient health-related quality of life (HRQoL) compared with healthy subjects.

METHODS: PPS patients were evaluated by means of the Stanford Sleepiness Scale and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). The Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire was utilized to assess HRQoL in PPS. RLS was diagnosed when standard criteria were met. Age and sex matched healthy controls were recruited amongst spouses or friends of PPS subjects.

RESULTS: A total of 66 PPS patients and 80 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. A significantly higher prevalence of RLS (P < 0.0005; odds ratio 21.5; 95% confidence interval 8.17–57) was found in PPS patients (PPS/RLS+ 63.6%) than in healthy controls (7.5%). The FSS score was higher in PPS/RLS+ than in PPS/RLS− patients (P = 0.03). A significant decrease of SF-36 scores, including the physical function (P = 0.001), physical role (P = 0.0001) and bodily pain (P = 0.03) domains, was found in PPS/RLS+ versus PPS/RLS− patients. Finally, it was found that PPS/RLS+ showed a significant correlation between International Restless Legs Scale score and FSS (P < 0.0001), as well as between International Restless Legs Scale score and most of the SF-36 items (physical role P = 0.0018, general health P = 0.0009, vitality P = 0.0022, social functioning P = 0.002, role emotional P = 0.0019, and mental health P = 0.0003).

Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate a high prevalence of RLS in PPS, and that RLS occurrence may significantly influence the HRQoL and fatigue of PPS patients. A hypothetical link between neuroanatomical and inflammatory mechanisms in RLS and PPS is suggested.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There are currently 5 papers in this category.

Category: Restless Legs Syndrome, Sleep Analysis

Title: Sleep disorders frequency in post-polio syndrome patients caused by periodic limb movements
Author: Araujo MA de P (1); Silva TMe (2); Moreira GA (3); Pradella-Hallinan M (3); Tufik S (4); Oliveira ASB (4)
Affiliation: (1) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Master in Health Sciences; (2) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Specialized in neuromuscular diseases; (3) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Doctor in Sciences; (4) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Post Doctor in Sciences
Journal: Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria
Citation: Arq. Neuro-Psiquiatr. vol.68 no.1 São Paulo Feb. 2010. dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0004-282X2010000100008
Publication Year and Month: 2010 02

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) in individuals with polio longer than 15 years is characterized by weakness and/or muscle fatigue, deficit of deglutition and breath and periodic limb movements (PLM) during sleep. We undertook a review of 99 patients with PPS, and assessed the frequency of PLM through polysomnographic recordings at our sleep disorders unit. The total number of PLM, total time of sleep (TTS), efficiency of sleep (EfS), awaking index (AI) and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were analyzed. Sixteen patients presented PLM in excess of 5 for the entire night. When comparing these with the group without PLM, a correlation was found (p=0.001). Significant difference was found for the correlation of the parameters: IAH, ID, TTS and EfS when compared the two groups. There is a close relationship between PPS and PLM.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Sleep disorders frequency in post-polio syndrome patients caused by periodic limb movements
Author: Araujo MA (1), Silva TM, Moreira GA, Pradella-Hallinan M, Tufik S, Oliveira AS
Affiliation: (1) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil
Journal: Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria
Citation: Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2010 Feb;68(1):35-8.
Publication Year and Month: 2010 02

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) in individuals with polio longer than 15 years is characterized by weakness and/or muscle fatigue, deficit of deglutition and breath and periodic limb movements (PLM) during sleep. We undertook a review of 99 patients with PPS, and assessed the frequency of PLM through polysomnographic recordings at our sleep disorders unit. The total number of PLM, total time of sleep (TTS), efficiency of sleep (EfS), awaking index (AI) and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were analyzed. Sixteen patients presented PLM in excess of 5 for the entire night. When comparing these with the group without PLM, a correlation was found (p=0.001). Significant difference was found for the correlation of the parameters: IAH, ID, TTS and EfS when compared the two groups. There is a close relationship between PPS and PLM.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Restless legs syndrome and post polio syndrome: a case−control study
Author: Romigi A (1,2), Pierantozzi M (3), Placidi F (1), Evangelista E (1), Albanese M (1)1, Liguori C (1), Nazzaro M (4), Risina BU (5), Simonelli V (6), Izzi F (1), Mercuri NB (1,7), Desiato MT (8)
Affiliation: (1) Neurophysiopathology Unit, Sleep Medicine Centre, Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; (2) IRCCS Neuromed Via Atinense 18, Pozzilli (IS), Italy; (3) Department of Neuroscience, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy; (4) UOC Governo Clinico in Riabilitazione Azienda Ospedaliera S. Camillo Forlanini, Rome, Italy; (5) Neuropsichiatra Infantile – Centro di Riabilitazione Vaclav Vojta, Rome, Italy; (6) UOC Neurologia Ospedale Monaldi – Napoli, Napoli, Italy; (7) IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; (8) Division of Neurophysiopathology, Sant'Eugenio Hospital, Rome, Italy
Journal: European Journal of Neurology
Citation: Eur J Neurol. 2015 Mar; 22(3):472-8. doi: 10.1111/ene.12593
Publication Year and Month: 2015 03

Abstract: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim was to investigate the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS), fatigue and daytime sleepiness in a large cohort of patients affected by post polio syndrome (PPS) and their impact on patient health-related quality of life (HRQoL) compared with healthy subjects.

METHODS: PPS patients were evaluated by means of the Stanford Sleepiness Scale and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). The Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire was utilized to assess HRQoL in PPS. RLS was diagnosed when standard criteria were met. Age and sex matched healthy controls were recruited amongst spouses or friends of PPS subjects.

RESULTS: A total of 66 PPS patients and 80 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. A significantly higher prevalence of RLS (P < 0.0005; odds ratio 21.5; 95% confidence interval 8.17–57) was found in PPS patients (PPS/RLS+ 63.6%) than in healthy controls (7.5%). The FSS score was higher in PPS/RLS+ than in PPS/RLS− patients (P = 0.03). A significant decrease of SF-36 scores, including the physical function (P = 0.001), physical role (P = 0.0001) and bodily pain (P = 0.03) domains, was found in PPS/RLS+ versus PPS/RLS− patients. Finally, it was found that PPS/RLS+ showed a significant correlation between International Restless Legs Scale score and FSS (P < 0.0001), as well as between International Restless Legs Scale score and most of the SF-36 items (physical role P = 0.0018, general health P = 0.0009, vitality P = 0.0022, social functioning P = 0.002, role emotional P = 0.0019, and mental health P = 0.0003).

Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate a high prevalence of RLS in PPS, and that RLS occurrence may significantly influence the HRQoL and fatigue of PPS patients. A hypothetical link between neuroanatomical and inflammatory mechanisms in RLS and PPS is suggested.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome: a series of 10 patients with demographic, clinical and laboratorial findings
Author: Marin LF (1), Carvalho LB, Prado LB, Quadros AA, Oliveira AS, Prado GF
Affiliation: (1) Neuro-Sono Sleep Center, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Claudio Rossi 394, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. [email protected]
Journal: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
Citation: Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2011 Aug;17(7):563-4. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2011.02.011
Publication Year and Month: 2011 08

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Few studies have described the occurrence of restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome.

METHODS: We studied 10 consecutive patients with post-polio syndrome and symptoms of restless legs syndrome. We look at demographic, clinical and laboratorial data.

RESULTS: A remarkable finding was the concomitant onset of symptoms of both diseases, suggesting a possible underlying mechanism. Severity of restless legs symptoms was moderate to very severe.

Conclusions: Epidemiological studies with larger samples are needed to better establish the relationship and the incidence of restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Restless legs syndrome in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis
Author: Kumru H (1), Portell E (2), Barrio M (2), Santamaria J (3)
Affiliation: (1) Institut Guttmann, Institut Universitari de Neurorehabilitació adscrit a la UAB, 08916 Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; Univ Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain; Fundació Institut d'Investigació en Ciències de la Salut Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; (2) Institut Guttmann, Institut Universitari de Neurorehabilitació adscrit a la UAB, 08916 Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; Univ Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain; Fundació Institut d'Investigació en Ciències de la Salut Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; (3) Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
Journal: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
Citation: Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2014 Oct;20(10):1056-8. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2014.06.014
Publication Year and Month: 2014 06

Abstract: BACKGROUND: No studies have examined the association between RLS and the sequelae of poliomyelitis (PM). We studied the frequency and severity of RLS in a group of consecutive patients with the sequelae of poliomyelitis (PM) and the effect of treatment with dopaminergic drugs.

METHODS: A diagnosis of RLS was made according to the criteria of the International RLS Study Group, and severity was assessed by the RLS rating scale. Information on sex, age, age at onset, site affected by PM, disease duration of PM, and history of post-polio syndrome (pPS) was obtained in a cohort of 52 PM patients.

RESULT: The mean age was 55.9 ± 6.5 years; 39 patients had post-polio syndrome (75%). RLS was diagnosed in 21 (40.4%) patients. Sixteen of the 21 patients (76.2%) with RLS had pPS, which was similar to the non-RLS group (74.2% patients with pPS). RLS symptoms were very severe in 5 patients, severe in 13, moderate in 2 and mild in 1. Nineteen of the 21 patients with RLS had symptoms predominantly in the more affected lower limb (90% of patients). Sixteen patients received dopaminergic agonist treatment with a significant reduction in their scores on the RLS severity scale from 28.3 ± 4.7 to 6.9 ± 7.3 (p < 0.001).

DISCUSSION: RLS occurs frequently in patients with PM, both in those with and without pPS, and responds well to treatment with dopaminergic drugs.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Effective

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There are currently 5 papers in this category.

Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Restless legs syndrome and post polio syndrome: a case−control study
Author: Romigi A (1,2), Pierantozzi M (3), Placidi F (1), Evangelista E (1), Albanese M (1)1, Liguori C (1), Nazzaro M (4), Risina BU (5), Simonelli V (6), Izzi F (1), Mercuri NB (1,7), Desiato MT (8)
Affiliation: (1) Neurophysiopathology Unit, Sleep Medicine Centre, Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; (2) IRCCS Neuromed Via Atinense 18, Pozzilli (IS), Italy; (3) Department of Neuroscience, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy; (4) UOC Governo Clinico in Riabilitazione Azienda Ospedaliera S. Camillo Forlanini, Rome, Italy; (5) Neuropsichiatra Infantile – Centro di Riabilitazione Vaclav Vojta, Rome, Italy; (6) UOC Neurologia Ospedale Monaldi – Napoli, Napoli, Italy; (7) IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; (8) Division of Neurophysiopathology, Sant'Eugenio Hospital, Rome, Italy
Journal: European Journal of Neurology
Citation: Eur J Neurol. 2015 Mar; 22(3):472-8. doi: 10.1111/ene.12593
Publication Year and Month: 2015 03

Abstract: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The aim was to investigate the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS), fatigue and daytime sleepiness in a large cohort of patients affected by post polio syndrome (PPS) and their impact on patient health-related quality of life (HRQoL) compared with healthy subjects.

METHODS: PPS patients were evaluated by means of the Stanford Sleepiness Scale and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). The Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire was utilized to assess HRQoL in PPS. RLS was diagnosed when standard criteria were met. Age and sex matched healthy controls were recruited amongst spouses or friends of PPS subjects.

RESULTS: A total of 66 PPS patients and 80 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. A significantly higher prevalence of RLS (P < 0.0005; odds ratio 21.5; 95% confidence interval 8.17–57) was found in PPS patients (PPS/RLS+ 63.6%) than in healthy controls (7.5%). The FSS score was higher in PPS/RLS+ than in PPS/RLS− patients (P = 0.03). A significant decrease of SF-36 scores, including the physical function (P = 0.001), physical role (P = 0.0001) and bodily pain (P = 0.03) domains, was found in PPS/RLS+ versus PPS/RLS− patients. Finally, it was found that PPS/RLS+ showed a significant correlation between International Restless Legs Scale score and FSS (P < 0.0001), as well as between International Restless Legs Scale score and most of the SF-36 items (physical role P = 0.0018, general health P = 0.0009, vitality P = 0.0022, social functioning P = 0.002, role emotional P = 0.0019, and mental health P = 0.0003).

Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate a high prevalence of RLS in PPS, and that RLS occurrence may significantly influence the HRQoL and fatigue of PPS patients. A hypothetical link between neuroanatomical and inflammatory mechanisms in RLS and PPS is suggested.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Restless legs syndrome in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis
Author: Kumru H (1), Portell E (2), Barrio M (2), Santamaria J (3)
Affiliation: (1) Institut Guttmann, Institut Universitari de Neurorehabilitació adscrit a la UAB, 08916 Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; Univ Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain; Fundació Institut d'Investigació en Ciències de la Salut Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; (2) Institut Guttmann, Institut Universitari de Neurorehabilitació adscrit a la UAB, 08916 Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; Univ Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain; Fundació Institut d'Investigació en Ciències de la Salut Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; (3) Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
Journal: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
Citation: Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2014 Oct;20(10):1056-8. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2014.06.014
Publication Year and Month: 2014 06

Abstract: BACKGROUND: No studies have examined the association between RLS and the sequelae of poliomyelitis (PM). We studied the frequency and severity of RLS in a group of consecutive patients with the sequelae of poliomyelitis (PM) and the effect of treatment with dopaminergic drugs.

METHODS: A diagnosis of RLS was made according to the criteria of the International RLS Study Group, and severity was assessed by the RLS rating scale. Information on sex, age, age at onset, site affected by PM, disease duration of PM, and history of post-polio syndrome (pPS) was obtained in a cohort of 52 PM patients.

RESULT: The mean age was 55.9 ± 6.5 years; 39 patients had post-polio syndrome (75%). RLS was diagnosed in 21 (40.4%) patients. Sixteen of the 21 patients (76.2%) with RLS had pPS, which was similar to the non-RLS group (74.2% patients with pPS). RLS symptoms were very severe in 5 patients, severe in 13, moderate in 2 and mild in 1. Nineteen of the 21 patients with RLS had symptoms predominantly in the more affected lower limb (90% of patients). Sixteen patients received dopaminergic agonist treatment with a significant reduction in their scores on the RLS severity scale from 28.3 ± 4.7 to 6.9 ± 7.3 (p < 0.001).

DISCUSSION: RLS occurs frequently in patients with PM, both in those with and without pPS, and responds well to treatment with dopaminergic drugs.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Effective

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Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome: a series of 10 patients with demographic, clinical and laboratorial findings
Author: Marin LF (1), Carvalho LB, Prado LB, Quadros AA, Oliveira AS, Prado GF
Affiliation: (1) Neuro-Sono Sleep Center, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Claudio Rossi 394, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. [email protected]
Journal: Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
Citation: Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2011 Aug;17(7):563-4. doi: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2011.02.011
Publication Year and Month: 2011 08

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Few studies have described the occurrence of restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome.

METHODS: We studied 10 consecutive patients with post-polio syndrome and symptoms of restless legs syndrome. We look at demographic, clinical and laboratorial data.

RESULTS: A remarkable finding was the concomitant onset of symptoms of both diseases, suggesting a possible underlying mechanism. Severity of restless legs symptoms was moderate to very severe.

Conclusions: Epidemiological studies with larger samples are needed to better establish the relationship and the incidence of restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Category: Restless Legs Syndrome, Sleep Analysis

Title: Sleep disorders frequency in post-polio syndrome patients caused by periodic limb movements
Author: Araujo MA de P (1); Silva TMe (2); Moreira GA (3); Pradella-Hallinan M (3); Tufik S (4); Oliveira ASB (4)
Affiliation: (1) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Master in Health Sciences; (2) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Specialized in neuromuscular diseases; (3) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Doctor in Sciences; (4) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil: Post Doctor in Sciences
Journal: Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria
Citation: Arq. Neuro-Psiquiatr. vol.68 no.1 São Paulo Feb. 2010. dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0004-282X2010000100008
Publication Year and Month: 2010 02

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) in individuals with polio longer than 15 years is characterized by weakness and/or muscle fatigue, deficit of deglutition and breath and periodic limb movements (PLM) during sleep. We undertook a review of 99 patients with PPS, and assessed the frequency of PLM through polysomnographic recordings at our sleep disorders unit. The total number of PLM, total time of sleep (TTS), efficiency of sleep (EfS), awaking index (AI) and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were analyzed. Sixteen patients presented PLM in excess of 5 for the entire night. When comparing these with the group without PLM, a correlation was found (p=0.001). Significant difference was found for the correlation of the parameters: IAH, ID, TTS and EfS when compared the two groups. There is a close relationship between PPS and PLM.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Restless Legs Syndrome

Title: Sleep disorders frequency in post-polio syndrome patients caused by periodic limb movements
Author: Araujo MA (1), Silva TM, Moreira GA, Pradella-Hallinan M, Tufik S, Oliveira AS
Affiliation: (1) Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Instituto do Sono, São Paulo SP, Brazil
Journal: Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria
Citation: Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2010 Feb;68(1):35-8.
Publication Year and Month: 2010 02

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) in individuals with polio longer than 15 years is characterized by weakness and/or muscle fatigue, deficit of deglutition and breath and periodic limb movements (PLM) during sleep. We undertook a review of 99 patients with PPS, and assessed the frequency of PLM through polysomnographic recordings at our sleep disorders unit. The total number of PLM, total time of sleep (TTS), efficiency of sleep (EfS), awaking index (AI) and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were analyzed. Sixteen patients presented PLM in excess of 5 for the entire night. When comparing these with the group without PLM, a correlation was found (p=0.001). Significant difference was found for the correlation of the parameters: IAH, ID, TTS and EfS when compared the two groups. There is a close relationship between PPS and PLM.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

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There are currently 5 papers in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications