Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Continence, Gender Differences

Title: Bladder symptoms among polio survivors
Author: Kay L, Bertelsen M
Affiliation: Danish Society of Polio and Accident Victims, Rødovre, Denmark
Journal: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: J Rehabil Med 2013; 45: 560–564
Publication Year and Month: 2013 05

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To describe bladder symptoms among polio survivors and the inconvenience they cause.

DESIGN: A survey using the validated Danish Prostatic Symptom Score questionnaire concerning bladder symptoms.

SUBJECTS: A random age- and gender-stratified sample of polio survivors drawn from members of the Danish Society of Polio and Accident Victims.

METHODS: Eligible subjects were sent the questionnaire by post.

RESULTS: Of 453 eligible subjects 272 responded. Within 2 weeks 87.5% of respondents had experienced at least one bladder symptom, and 76.5% reported that they had been bothered by a bladder symptom. Out of the 12 symptoms in the questionnaire we found a significant gender difference, with straining and weak stream reported more often among men, and urge incontinence reported more often among women. Incontinence occurred significantly more often among women (73.3%) than among men (40.9%). Compared with a similar study of the background population, bladder symptoms overall occurred approximately twice as often among polio survivors.

Conclusions: The majority of polio survivors experience bladder symptoms, prevalences being approximately twice as high as in the background population. Furthermore, polio survivors to a much larger extent find their bladder symptoms bothersome. A successful rehabilitation programme should therefore also focus on these symptoms.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


There are currently 1 papers in this category.

Category: Continence, Gender Differences

Title: Bladder symptoms among polio survivors
Author: Kay L, Bertelsen M
Affiliation: Danish Society of Polio and Accident Victims, Rødovre, Denmark
Journal: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: J Rehabil Med 2013; 45: 560–564
Publication Year and Month: 2013 05

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To describe bladder symptoms among polio survivors and the inconvenience they cause.

DESIGN: A survey using the validated Danish Prostatic Symptom Score questionnaire concerning bladder symptoms.

SUBJECTS: A random age- and gender-stratified sample of polio survivors drawn from members of the Danish Society of Polio and Accident Victims.

METHODS: Eligible subjects were sent the questionnaire by post.

RESULTS: Of 453 eligible subjects 272 responded. Within 2 weeks 87.5% of respondents had experienced at least one bladder symptom, and 76.5% reported that they had been bothered by a bladder symptom. Out of the 12 symptoms in the questionnaire we found a significant gender difference, with straining and weak stream reported more often among men, and urge incontinence reported more often among women. Incontinence occurred significantly more often among women (73.3%) than among men (40.9%). Compared with a similar study of the background population, bladder symptoms overall occurred approximately twice as often among polio survivors.

Conclusions: The majority of polio survivors experience bladder symptoms, prevalences being approximately twice as high as in the background population. Furthermore, polio survivors to a much larger extent find their bladder symptoms bothersome. A successful rehabilitation programme should therefore also focus on these symptoms.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


There are currently 1 papers in this category.

Category: Continence, Gender Differences

Title: Bladder symptoms among polio survivors
Author: Kay L, Bertelsen M
Affiliation: Danish Society of Polio and Accident Victims, Rødovre, Denmark
Journal: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: J Rehabil Med 2013; 45: 560–564
Publication Year and Month: 2013 05

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To describe bladder symptoms among polio survivors and the inconvenience they cause.

DESIGN: A survey using the validated Danish Prostatic Symptom Score questionnaire concerning bladder symptoms.

SUBJECTS: A random age- and gender-stratified sample of polio survivors drawn from members of the Danish Society of Polio and Accident Victims.

METHODS: Eligible subjects were sent the questionnaire by post.

RESULTS: Of 453 eligible subjects 272 responded. Within 2 weeks 87.5% of respondents had experienced at least one bladder symptom, and 76.5% reported that they had been bothered by a bladder symptom. Out of the 12 symptoms in the questionnaire we found a significant gender difference, with straining and weak stream reported more often among men, and urge incontinence reported more often among women. Incontinence occurred significantly more often among women (73.3%) than among men (40.9%). Compared with a similar study of the background population, bladder symptoms overall occurred approximately twice as often among polio survivors.

Conclusions: The majority of polio survivors experience bladder symptoms, prevalences being approximately twice as high as in the background population. Furthermore, polio survivors to a much larger extent find their bladder symptoms bothersome. A successful rehabilitation programme should therefore also focus on these symptoms.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


There are currently 1 papers in this category.

Category: Continence, Gender Differences

Title: Bladder symptoms among polio survivors
Author: Kay L, Bertelsen M
Affiliation: Danish Society of Polio and Accident Victims, Rødovre, Denmark
Journal: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: J Rehabil Med 2013; 45: 560–564
Publication Year and Month: 2013 05

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To describe bladder symptoms among polio survivors and the inconvenience they cause.

DESIGN: A survey using the validated Danish Prostatic Symptom Score questionnaire concerning bladder symptoms.

SUBJECTS: A random age- and gender-stratified sample of polio survivors drawn from members of the Danish Society of Polio and Accident Victims.

METHODS: Eligible subjects were sent the questionnaire by post.

RESULTS: Of 453 eligible subjects 272 responded. Within 2 weeks 87.5% of respondents had experienced at least one bladder symptom, and 76.5% reported that they had been bothered by a bladder symptom. Out of the 12 symptoms in the questionnaire we found a significant gender difference, with straining and weak stream reported more often among men, and urge incontinence reported more often among women. Incontinence occurred significantly more often among women (73.3%) than among men (40.9%). Compared with a similar study of the background population, bladder symptoms overall occurred approximately twice as often among polio survivors.

Conclusions: The majority of polio survivors experience bladder symptoms, prevalences being approximately twice as high as in the background population. Furthermore, polio survivors to a much larger extent find their bladder symptoms bothersome. A successful rehabilitation programme should therefore also focus on these symptoms.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


There are currently 1 papers in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications