Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Clinical Evaluation, Diagnosis and Management, Late Effects of Polio

Title: Post-polio Syndrome: More Than Just a Lower Motor Neuron Disease
Author: Stacey Li Hi Shing, Rangariroyashe H. Chipika, Eoin Finegan, Deirdre Murray, Orla Hardiman, and Peter Bede
Affiliation: Computational Neuroimaging Group, Academic Unit of Neurology, Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Edited by: Francesca Trojsi, University of Campania, Luigi Vanvitelli Caserta, Italy
Reviewed by: Andrea Romigi, Mediterranean Neurological Institute (IRCCS), Italy; Louisa Ng, The University of Melbourne, Australia
*Correspondence: Peter Bede [email protected]
Journal: Frontiers in Neurology
Citation: Li Hi Shing, S., Chipika, R. H., Finegan, E., Murray, D., Hardiman, O., & Bede, P. (2019). Post-polio Syndrome: More Than Just a Lower Motor Neuron Disease. Frontiers in neurology, 10, 773. https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2019.00773
Publication Year and Month: 2019 07

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) is a neurological condition that affects polio survivors decades after their initial infection. Despite its high prevalence, the etiology of PPS remains elusive, mechanisms of progression are poorly understood, and the condition is notoriously under-researched. While motor dysfunction is a hallmark feature of the condition, generalized fatigue, sleep disturbance, decreased endurance, neuropsychological deficits, sensory symptoms, and chronic pain are also often reported and have considerable quality of life implications in PPS. The non-motor aspects of PPS are particularly challenging to evaluate, quantify, and treat. Generalized fatigue is one of the most distressing symptoms of PPS and is likely to be multifactorial due to weight-gain, respiratory compromise, poor sleep, and polypharmacy. No validated diagnostic, monitoring, or prognostic markers have been developed in PPS to date and the mainstay of therapy centers on symptomatic relief and individualized rehabilitation strategies such as energy conservation and muscle strengthening exercise regimes. Despite a number of large clinical trials in PPS, no effective disease-modifying pharmacological treatments are currently available.

Conclusions: Despite being one of the most devastating neurodegenerative conditions in the world, surprisingly limited research is undertaken in post-polio syndrome. Its pathogenesis remains elusive, no sensitive diagnostic tools have been developed, and validated prognostic and monitoring markers are lacking. Non-motor symptoms of PPS have considerable quality of life implications and are notoriously challenging to manage. The etiology of fatigue in PPS is yet to be elucidated and successful individualized management strategies are needed to maintain mobility, independence, and patient autonomy. There is striking a paucity of neuroimaging studies in PPS that could provide anatomical insights into the substrate of extra-motor symptoms. Ultimately, the characterization of PPS-associated pathology may help research efforts in other motor neuron diseases.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any): This is a good overview of Post-Polio conditions particularly for clinicians new to the topic.

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Clinical Evaluation

Title: Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome.
Author: Bickerstaffe, A., Beelen, A., Zwarts, M.J., Nollet, F., van Dijk, J.P.
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, The Netherlands
Journal: Muscle & Nerve
Citation: Bickerstaffe, A et al (2015) Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome. Muscle and Nerve. 51(1):24-9
Publication Year and Month: 2015 01

Abstract: INTRODUCTION:
We investigated whether muscle ultrasound can distinguish muscles affected by post-polio syndrome (PPS) from healthy muscles and whether severity of ultrasound abnormalities is associated with muscle strength.
METHODS:
Echo intensity, muscle thickness, and isometric strength of the quadriceps muscles were measured in 48 patients with PPS and 12 healthy controls.
RESULTS:
Patients with PPS had significantly higher echo intensity and lower muscle thickness than healthy controls. In patients, both echo intensity and muscle thickness were associated independently with muscle strength. A combined measure of echo intensity and muscle thickness was more strongly related to muscle strength than either parameter alone.
CONCLUSIONS:
Quantitative ultrasound distinguishes healthy muscles from those affected by PPS, and measures of muscle quality and quantity are associated with muscle strength. Hence, ultrasound could be a useful tool for assessing disease severity and monitoring changes resulting from disease progression or clinical intervention in patients with PPS.

Conclusions:
Ultrasound can be effective to assess and monitor changes in muscle properties of a patient with post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There is currently 2 paper in this category.

Category: Clinical Evaluation

Title: Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome.
Author: Bickerstaffe, A., Beelen, A., Zwarts, M.J., Nollet, F., van Dijk, J.P.
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, The Netherlands
Journal: Muscle & Nerve
Citation: Bickerstaffe, A et al (2015) Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome. Muscle and Nerve. 51(1):24-9
Publication Year and Month: 2015 01

Abstract: INTRODUCTION:
We investigated whether muscle ultrasound can distinguish muscles affected by post-polio syndrome (PPS) from healthy muscles and whether severity of ultrasound abnormalities is associated with muscle strength.
METHODS:
Echo intensity, muscle thickness, and isometric strength of the quadriceps muscles were measured in 48 patients with PPS and 12 healthy controls.
RESULTS:
Patients with PPS had significantly higher echo intensity and lower muscle thickness than healthy controls. In patients, both echo intensity and muscle thickness were associated independently with muscle strength. A combined measure of echo intensity and muscle thickness was more strongly related to muscle strength than either parameter alone.
CONCLUSIONS:
Quantitative ultrasound distinguishes healthy muscles from those affected by PPS, and measures of muscle quality and quantity are associated with muscle strength. Hence, ultrasound could be a useful tool for assessing disease severity and monitoring changes resulting from disease progression or clinical intervention in patients with PPS.

Conclusions:
Ultrasound can be effective to assess and monitor changes in muscle properties of a patient with post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Clinical Evaluation, Diagnosis and Management, Late Effects of Polio

Title: Post-polio Syndrome: More Than Just a Lower Motor Neuron Disease
Author: Stacey Li Hi Shing, Rangariroyashe H. Chipika, Eoin Finegan, Deirdre Murray, Orla Hardiman, and Peter Bede
Affiliation: Computational Neuroimaging Group, Academic Unit of Neurology, Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Edited by: Francesca Trojsi, University of Campania, Luigi Vanvitelli Caserta, Italy
Reviewed by: Andrea Romigi, Mediterranean Neurological Institute (IRCCS), Italy; Louisa Ng, The University of Melbourne, Australia
*Correspondence: Peter Bede [email protected]
Journal: Frontiers in Neurology
Citation: Li Hi Shing, S., Chipika, R. H., Finegan, E., Murray, D., Hardiman, O., & Bede, P. (2019). Post-polio Syndrome: More Than Just a Lower Motor Neuron Disease. Frontiers in neurology, 10, 773. https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2019.00773
Publication Year and Month: 2019 07

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) is a neurological condition that affects polio survivors decades after their initial infection. Despite its high prevalence, the etiology of PPS remains elusive, mechanisms of progression are poorly understood, and the condition is notoriously under-researched. While motor dysfunction is a hallmark feature of the condition, generalized fatigue, sleep disturbance, decreased endurance, neuropsychological deficits, sensory symptoms, and chronic pain are also often reported and have considerable quality of life implications in PPS. The non-motor aspects of PPS are particularly challenging to evaluate, quantify, and treat. Generalized fatigue is one of the most distressing symptoms of PPS and is likely to be multifactorial due to weight-gain, respiratory compromise, poor sleep, and polypharmacy. No validated diagnostic, monitoring, or prognostic markers have been developed in PPS to date and the mainstay of therapy centers on symptomatic relief and individualized rehabilitation strategies such as energy conservation and muscle strengthening exercise regimes. Despite a number of large clinical trials in PPS, no effective disease-modifying pharmacological treatments are currently available.

Conclusions: Despite being one of the most devastating neurodegenerative conditions in the world, surprisingly limited research is undertaken in post-polio syndrome. Its pathogenesis remains elusive, no sensitive diagnostic tools have been developed, and validated prognostic and monitoring markers are lacking. Non-motor symptoms of PPS have considerable quality of life implications and are notoriously challenging to manage. The etiology of fatigue in PPS is yet to be elucidated and successful individualized management strategies are needed to maintain mobility, independence, and patient autonomy. There is striking a paucity of neuroimaging studies in PPS that could provide anatomical insights into the substrate of extra-motor symptoms. Ultimately, the characterization of PPS-associated pathology may help research efforts in other motor neuron diseases.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any): This is a good overview of Post-Polio conditions particularly for clinicians new to the topic.

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


There is currently 2 paper in this category.

Category: Clinical Evaluation, Diagnosis and Management, Late Effects of Polio

Title: Post-polio Syndrome: More Than Just a Lower Motor Neuron Disease
Author: Stacey Li Hi Shing, Rangariroyashe H. Chipika, Eoin Finegan, Deirdre Murray, Orla Hardiman, and Peter Bede
Affiliation: Computational Neuroimaging Group, Academic Unit of Neurology, Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Edited by: Francesca Trojsi, University of Campania, Luigi Vanvitelli Caserta, Italy
Reviewed by: Andrea Romigi, Mediterranean Neurological Institute (IRCCS), Italy; Louisa Ng, The University of Melbourne, Australia
*Correspondence: Peter Bede [email protected]
Journal: Frontiers in Neurology
Citation: Li Hi Shing, S., Chipika, R. H., Finegan, E., Murray, D., Hardiman, O., & Bede, P. (2019). Post-polio Syndrome: More Than Just a Lower Motor Neuron Disease. Frontiers in neurology, 10, 773. https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2019.00773
Publication Year and Month: 2019 07

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) is a neurological condition that affects polio survivors decades after their initial infection. Despite its high prevalence, the etiology of PPS remains elusive, mechanisms of progression are poorly understood, and the condition is notoriously under-researched. While motor dysfunction is a hallmark feature of the condition, generalized fatigue, sleep disturbance, decreased endurance, neuropsychological deficits, sensory symptoms, and chronic pain are also often reported and have considerable quality of life implications in PPS. The non-motor aspects of PPS are particularly challenging to evaluate, quantify, and treat. Generalized fatigue is one of the most distressing symptoms of PPS and is likely to be multifactorial due to weight-gain, respiratory compromise, poor sleep, and polypharmacy. No validated diagnostic, monitoring, or prognostic markers have been developed in PPS to date and the mainstay of therapy centers on symptomatic relief and individualized rehabilitation strategies such as energy conservation and muscle strengthening exercise regimes. Despite a number of large clinical trials in PPS, no effective disease-modifying pharmacological treatments are currently available.

Conclusions: Despite being one of the most devastating neurodegenerative conditions in the world, surprisingly limited research is undertaken in post-polio syndrome. Its pathogenesis remains elusive, no sensitive diagnostic tools have been developed, and validated prognostic and monitoring markers are lacking. Non-motor symptoms of PPS have considerable quality of life implications and are notoriously challenging to manage. The etiology of fatigue in PPS is yet to be elucidated and successful individualized management strategies are needed to maintain mobility, independence, and patient autonomy. There is striking a paucity of neuroimaging studies in PPS that could provide anatomical insights into the substrate of extra-motor symptoms. Ultimately, the characterization of PPS-associated pathology may help research efforts in other motor neuron diseases.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any): This is a good overview of Post-Polio conditions particularly for clinicians new to the topic.

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Clinical Evaluation

Title: Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome.
Author: Bickerstaffe, A., Beelen, A., Zwarts, M.J., Nollet, F., van Dijk, J.P.
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, The Netherlands
Journal: Muscle & Nerve
Citation: Bickerstaffe, A et al (2015) Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome. Muscle and Nerve. 51(1):24-9
Publication Year and Month: 2015 01

Abstract: INTRODUCTION:
We investigated whether muscle ultrasound can distinguish muscles affected by post-polio syndrome (PPS) from healthy muscles and whether severity of ultrasound abnormalities is associated with muscle strength.
METHODS:
Echo intensity, muscle thickness, and isometric strength of the quadriceps muscles were measured in 48 patients with PPS and 12 healthy controls.
RESULTS:
Patients with PPS had significantly higher echo intensity and lower muscle thickness than healthy controls. In patients, both echo intensity and muscle thickness were associated independently with muscle strength. A combined measure of echo intensity and muscle thickness was more strongly related to muscle strength than either parameter alone.
CONCLUSIONS:
Quantitative ultrasound distinguishes healthy muscles from those affected by PPS, and measures of muscle quality and quantity are associated with muscle strength. Hence, ultrasound could be a useful tool for assessing disease severity and monitoring changes resulting from disease progression or clinical intervention in patients with PPS.

Conclusions:
Ultrasound can be effective to assess and monitor changes in muscle properties of a patient with post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There is currently 2 paper in this category.

Category: Clinical Evaluation, Diagnosis and Management, Late Effects of Polio

Title: Post-polio Syndrome: More Than Just a Lower Motor Neuron Disease
Author: Stacey Li Hi Shing, Rangariroyashe H. Chipika, Eoin Finegan, Deirdre Murray, Orla Hardiman, and Peter Bede
Affiliation: Computational Neuroimaging Group, Academic Unit of Neurology, Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
Edited by: Francesca Trojsi, University of Campania, Luigi Vanvitelli Caserta, Italy
Reviewed by: Andrea Romigi, Mediterranean Neurological Institute (IRCCS), Italy; Louisa Ng, The University of Melbourne, Australia
*Correspondence: Peter Bede [email protected]
Journal: Frontiers in Neurology
Citation: Li Hi Shing, S., Chipika, R. H., Finegan, E., Murray, D., Hardiman, O., & Bede, P. (2019). Post-polio Syndrome: More Than Just a Lower Motor Neuron Disease. Frontiers in neurology, 10, 773. https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2019.00773
Publication Year and Month: 2019 07

Abstract: Post-polio syndrome (PPS) is a neurological condition that affects polio survivors decades after their initial infection. Despite its high prevalence, the etiology of PPS remains elusive, mechanisms of progression are poorly understood, and the condition is notoriously under-researched. While motor dysfunction is a hallmark feature of the condition, generalized fatigue, sleep disturbance, decreased endurance, neuropsychological deficits, sensory symptoms, and chronic pain are also often reported and have considerable quality of life implications in PPS. The non-motor aspects of PPS are particularly challenging to evaluate, quantify, and treat. Generalized fatigue is one of the most distressing symptoms of PPS and is likely to be multifactorial due to weight-gain, respiratory compromise, poor sleep, and polypharmacy. No validated diagnostic, monitoring, or prognostic markers have been developed in PPS to date and the mainstay of therapy centers on symptomatic relief and individualized rehabilitation strategies such as energy conservation and muscle strengthening exercise regimes. Despite a number of large clinical trials in PPS, no effective disease-modifying pharmacological treatments are currently available.

Conclusions: Despite being one of the most devastating neurodegenerative conditions in the world, surprisingly limited research is undertaken in post-polio syndrome. Its pathogenesis remains elusive, no sensitive diagnostic tools have been developed, and validated prognostic and monitoring markers are lacking. Non-motor symptoms of PPS have considerable quality of life implications and are notoriously challenging to manage. The etiology of fatigue in PPS is yet to be elucidated and successful individualized management strategies are needed to maintain mobility, independence, and patient autonomy. There is striking a paucity of neuroimaging studies in PPS that could provide anatomical insights into the substrate of extra-motor symptoms. Ultimately, the characterization of PPS-associated pathology may help research efforts in other motor neuron diseases.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any): This is a good overview of Post-Polio conditions particularly for clinicians new to the topic.

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Clinical Evaluation

Title: Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome.
Author: Bickerstaffe, A., Beelen, A., Zwarts, M.J., Nollet, F., van Dijk, J.P.
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, The Netherlands
Journal: Muscle & Nerve
Citation: Bickerstaffe, A et al (2015) Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome. Muscle and Nerve. 51(1):24-9
Publication Year and Month: 2015 01

Abstract: INTRODUCTION:
We investigated whether muscle ultrasound can distinguish muscles affected by post-polio syndrome (PPS) from healthy muscles and whether severity of ultrasound abnormalities is associated with muscle strength.
METHODS:
Echo intensity, muscle thickness, and isometric strength of the quadriceps muscles were measured in 48 patients with PPS and 12 healthy controls.
RESULTS:
Patients with PPS had significantly higher echo intensity and lower muscle thickness than healthy controls. In patients, both echo intensity and muscle thickness were associated independently with muscle strength. A combined measure of echo intensity and muscle thickness was more strongly related to muscle strength than either parameter alone.
CONCLUSIONS:
Quantitative ultrasound distinguishes healthy muscles from those affected by PPS, and measures of muscle quality and quantity are associated with muscle strength. Hence, ultrasound could be a useful tool for assessing disease severity and monitoring changes resulting from disease progression or clinical intervention in patients with PPS.

Conclusions:
Ultrasound can be effective to assess and monitor changes in muscle properties of a patient with post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There is currently 2 paper in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications