Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Clinical Evaluation

Title: Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome.
Author: Bickerstaffe, A., Beelen, A., Zwarts, M.J., Nollet, F., van Dijk, J.P.
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, The Netherlands
Journal: Muscle & Nerve
Citation: Bickerstaffe, A et al (2015) Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome. Muscle and Nerve. 51(1):24-9
Publication Year and Month: 2015 01

Abstract: INTRODUCTION:
We investigated whether muscle ultrasound can distinguish muscles affected by post-polio syndrome (PPS) from healthy muscles and whether severity of ultrasound abnormalities is associated with muscle strength.
METHODS:
Echo intensity, muscle thickness, and isometric strength of the quadriceps muscles were measured in 48 patients with PPS and 12 healthy controls.
RESULTS:
Patients with PPS had significantly higher echo intensity and lower muscle thickness than healthy controls. In patients, both echo intensity and muscle thickness were associated independently with muscle strength. A combined measure of echo intensity and muscle thickness was more strongly related to muscle strength than either parameter alone.
CONCLUSIONS:
Quantitative ultrasound distinguishes healthy muscles from those affected by PPS, and measures of muscle quality and quantity are associated with muscle strength. Hence, ultrasound could be a useful tool for assessing disease severity and monitoring changes resulting from disease progression or clinical intervention in patients with PPS.

Conclusions:
Ultrasound can be effective to assess and monitor changes in muscle properties of a patient with post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: Effective

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Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There is currently 1 paper in this category.

Category: Clinical Evaluation

Title: Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome.
Author: Bickerstaffe, A., Beelen, A., Zwarts, M.J., Nollet, F., van Dijk, J.P.
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, The Netherlands
Journal: Muscle & Nerve
Citation: Bickerstaffe, A et al (2015) Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome. Muscle and Nerve. 51(1):24-9
Publication Year and Month: 2015 01

Abstract: INTRODUCTION:
We investigated whether muscle ultrasound can distinguish muscles affected by post-polio syndrome (PPS) from healthy muscles and whether severity of ultrasound abnormalities is associated with muscle strength.
METHODS:
Echo intensity, muscle thickness, and isometric strength of the quadriceps muscles were measured in 48 patients with PPS and 12 healthy controls.
RESULTS:
Patients with PPS had significantly higher echo intensity and lower muscle thickness than healthy controls. In patients, both echo intensity and muscle thickness were associated independently with muscle strength. A combined measure of echo intensity and muscle thickness was more strongly related to muscle strength than either parameter alone.
CONCLUSIONS:
Quantitative ultrasound distinguishes healthy muscles from those affected by PPS, and measures of muscle quality and quantity are associated with muscle strength. Hence, ultrasound could be a useful tool for assessing disease severity and monitoring changes resulting from disease progression or clinical intervention in patients with PPS.

Conclusions:
Ultrasound can be effective to assess and monitor changes in muscle properties of a patient with post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There is currently 1 paper in this category.

Category: Clinical Evaluation

Title: Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome.
Author: Bickerstaffe, A., Beelen, A., Zwarts, M.J., Nollet, F., van Dijk, J.P.
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, The Netherlands
Journal: Muscle & Nerve
Citation: Bickerstaffe, A et al (2015) Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome. Muscle and Nerve. 51(1):24-9
Publication Year and Month: 2015 01

Abstract: INTRODUCTION:
We investigated whether muscle ultrasound can distinguish muscles affected by post-polio syndrome (PPS) from healthy muscles and whether severity of ultrasound abnormalities is associated with muscle strength.
METHODS:
Echo intensity, muscle thickness, and isometric strength of the quadriceps muscles were measured in 48 patients with PPS and 12 healthy controls.
RESULTS:
Patients with PPS had significantly higher echo intensity and lower muscle thickness than healthy controls. In patients, both echo intensity and muscle thickness were associated independently with muscle strength. A combined measure of echo intensity and muscle thickness was more strongly related to muscle strength than either parameter alone.
CONCLUSIONS:
Quantitative ultrasound distinguishes healthy muscles from those affected by PPS, and measures of muscle quality and quantity are associated with muscle strength. Hence, ultrasound could be a useful tool for assessing disease severity and monitoring changes resulting from disease progression or clinical intervention in patients with PPS.

Conclusions:
Ultrasound can be effective to assess and monitor changes in muscle properties of a patient with post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There is currently 1 paper in this category.

Category: Clinical Evaluation

Title: Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome.
Author: Bickerstaffe, A., Beelen, A., Zwarts, M.J., Nollet, F., van Dijk, J.P.
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, The Netherlands
Journal: Muscle & Nerve
Citation: Bickerstaffe, A et al (2015) Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome. Muscle and Nerve. 51(1):24-9
Publication Year and Month: 2015 01

Abstract: INTRODUCTION:
We investigated whether muscle ultrasound can distinguish muscles affected by post-polio syndrome (PPS) from healthy muscles and whether severity of ultrasound abnormalities is associated with muscle strength.
METHODS:
Echo intensity, muscle thickness, and isometric strength of the quadriceps muscles were measured in 48 patients with PPS and 12 healthy controls.
RESULTS:
Patients with PPS had significantly higher echo intensity and lower muscle thickness than healthy controls. In patients, both echo intensity and muscle thickness were associated independently with muscle strength. A combined measure of echo intensity and muscle thickness was more strongly related to muscle strength than either parameter alone.
CONCLUSIONS:
Quantitative ultrasound distinguishes healthy muscles from those affected by PPS, and measures of muscle quality and quantity are associated with muscle strength. Hence, ultrasound could be a useful tool for assessing disease severity and monitoring changes resulting from disease progression or clinical intervention in patients with PPS.

Conclusions:
Ultrasound can be effective to assess and monitor changes in muscle properties of a patient with post-polio syndrome.

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There is currently 1 paper in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications