Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Developing vocational rehabilitation services for people with long-term neurological conditions: Identifying facilitators and barriers to service provision
Author: Kate Hayward, Bilal A Mateen, E Diane Playford, Gail Eva
Affiliation: Therapy and Rehabilitation Services, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
Journal: British Journal of Occupational Therapy (BJOT)
Citation:
Publication Year and Month: 2019 03

Abstract: Introduction
This study aimed to understand existing vocational rehabilitation service provision in one locality in London (population 3.74 million), identify any gaps and explore reasons for this, to support service development.

Method
Using soft systems methodology to guide the research process, semi-structured interviews were completed with nine participants, who were clinicians and managers providing vocational rehabilitation within a National Health Service context. Data were analysed thematically to build a ‘rich picture’ and develop a conceptual model of vocational rehabilitation service delivery. Findings were then ratified with participants at an engagement event.

Results
The findings indicate a spectrum of vocational rehabilitation service provision for long-term neurological conditions with differing levels of funding in place. Vocational rehabilitation often takes place ‘under the radar’ and therefore the true vocational rehabilitation needs of this population, and the extent of service provision, is not known. There is inconsistency of understanding across the services as to what constitutes vocational rehabilitation and outcomes are not routinely measured.

Conclusions: For vocational rehabilitation services to develop they require appropriate funding, driven by government policy to commissioners. Clear definitions of vocational rehabilitation, collecting and sharing outcome data and effective communication across services are needed at a local level. This is expressed in a conceptual model of vocational rehabilitation service delivery.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Education, occupation, and perception of health amongst previous polio patients compared to their siblings.
Author: Farbu E, Gilhus NE.
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. [email protected]
Journal: European Journal of Neurology
Citation: 2002 May;9(3):233-41.
Publication Year and Month: 2002 05

Abstract: Patients with previous polio represent a challenge for neurological rehabilitation. We examined 168 previous polio patients and 239 of their siblings, the patients either from the 1950-1954 epidemic cohort, or from a cohort of hospital-admitted rehabilitation patients. Ninety-four paralytic patients and 74 non-paralytic patients were included. All patients and siblings answered the same questionnaires for socioeconomic and health factors and chi-square comparisons were performed. Previous polio did not affect the level of education. Both patients and siblings rated their educational options to have been good. Significantly less patients were full-time employed at the age of 40 years compared to their siblings (P=0.015). This was the result of a lower full-time employment rate amongst the paralytic patients, only 52% of this group being employed full-time. Male patients and paralytic patients reported to have experienced reduced professional options. More patients were living alone compared to their siblings (P=0.035). The perception of general health was lower amongst patients than siblings, as was assessment of total life situation and patients reported more frequently symptoms like pain and tiredness. In conclusion, previous polio had not lowered the polio patients' educational status, but fewer patients were employed full-time at the age of 40 years.

Conclusions: Previous polio had not lowered the polio patients' educational status, but fewer patients were employed full-time at the age of 40 years.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform
Author: Appelin K, Lexell J, Månsson Lexell E
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden
Journal: Occupational Therapy International
Citation: Occupational Therapy International - Occup Ther Int. 2014 Sep;21(3):98-107. doi: 10.1002/oti.1368
Publication Year and Month: 2014 09

Abstract: The aims of this study were to describe which occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, which occupational area the occupations were related to and their level of complexity. The aims were also to describe their own perception of the importance, performance and satisfaction with these occupations. Sixty-two participants (mean age 61 years) were assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. A total of 431 occupations were reported (43% self-care, 32% productivity and 25% leisure). Two subcategories, household management (27 %) and functional mobility (23 %), represented half of all the reported occupations. Ratings for prioritized occupations (N = 300) were high for importance and generally low for performance and satisfaction. A wide variety of occupations were reported, related to both occupational areas and different levels of complexity within an occupational area. The results underscore the importance of using assessment tools that can capture both the variety and complexity of occupations. By obtaining more detailed information about occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, this will enable occupational therapists to offer targeted interventions that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations. A larger and more heterogeneous sample may enable the results to be generalized to more people with late effects of polio. Future studies should focus on methods that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations for people with late effects of polio.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Overcoming barriers to work participation for patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome
Author: Ten Katen K, Beelen A, Nollet F, Frings-Dresen MH, Sluiter JK
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation
Citation: Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(6):522-9. doi: 10.3109/09638288.2010.503257. Epub 2010 Jul 12
Publication Year and Month: 2010 07

Abstract: PURPOSE: This study aimed to explore the perceived work ability of patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS), to identify barriers and factors that are impeding or conducive, respectively, to work participation, and to identify possible interventions.

METHODS: Qualitative cross-sectional interview study with 17 subjects with PPS, 12 women and 5 men, mean age 49 years (SD: 11). Semi-structured interviews were held with the subjects in their homes, with the aid of a topic list. The COREQ criteria list for qualitative research was used as guideline in design and analysis.

RESULTS: Thirteen out of 17 subjects rated their work ability six or higher on a scale from 0 to 10. Most subjects worked in an administrative, educational or managerial function. Five subjects stopped working, four worked between 0 and 20 h/week and eight worked between 20 and 40 h/week. Factors conducive to working were physical adaptations in the workplace, accessibility of the workplace and high decision latitude. Barriers to full work ability in PPS patients were high physical job demands, low social support and the symptoms of PPS, especially fatigue and pain.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that work-oriented interventions aimed at preventing PPS patients from dropping out of the workforce should primarily focus on reducing physical job demands, arranging adaptations in the workplace and increasing job control.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: University of Alberta Hospital Acute and Convalescent Polio Care and the Reintegration of Polio Patients into Albertan Communities, 1953–80
Author: Geraldine Huynh
Affiliation: University of Alberta
Journal: Canadian Bulletin of Medical History (CBMH)
Citation: https://doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.249-022018
Published Online: March 22, 2019
Publication Year and Month: 2019 03

Abstract: Following Canada’s largest polio epidemic in 1953, Station 67 at the University of Alberta Hospital (UAH) in Edmonton became home to patients who contracted the virus. As young as nine years old, some of these patients lived at the UAH for more than three decades. Akin to wartime services, the epidemic banded together families, patients, doctors, nurses, community members, and later respiratory, physical, and occupational therapists. The nature of the disease, the government response, and the social and economic climate dramatically affected the lived experiences of patients in Alberta’s fight against polio. Drawing on archival research and oral interviews, this article argues that it was the agency and resilience of patients, the contributions of healthcare providers to rapid developments in acute and convalescent care, and the dedication of families that were primarily responsible for the recovery and reintegration of polio patients back into the community.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Vocational implications of post-polio syndrome
Author: Elrod LM, Jabben M, Oswald G, Szirony GM
Affiliation: CARE Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
Journal: Work
Citation: Work. 2005;25(2):155-61
Publication Year and Month: 2005

Abstract: Of more than 1,000,000 survivors of poliomyelitis living in the United States, about 80% experience symptoms associated with post-polio syndrome (PPS). New weakness, fatigue, and pain are the most common symptoms that may appear years after acute polio. PPS is reported to be the most prevalent progressive neuromuscular disease in North America. The physical symptoms of PPS can be severe enough to decrease an individual's quality of life, significantly alter work function, and impose lifestyle changes. The psychological implications of battling once again with a disease that had stabilized decades ago can be devastating. Rehabilitation physicians and counselors knowledgeable of post-polio syndrome and its possible impact on employment can have a positive influence on persons with PPS.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Workplace disability management in postpolio syndrome
Author: Saeki S, Takemura J, Matsushima Y, Chisaka H, Hachisuka K
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1, Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 807-8555, Japan
Journal: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Citation: J Occup Rehabil. 2001 Dec;11(4):299-307
Publication Year and Month: 2001 12

Abstract: Postpolio syndrome (PPS) is generally defined as a clinical syndrome of new weakness, fatigue, and pain in individuals who have previously recovered from acute paralytic poliomyelitis. These new problems may lead to loss of employment as well as new deficits in instrumental activities in daily living (cleaning, washing, shopping, transportation, etc.), walking, climbing stairs, and personal assistance. We presented three cases of PPS with working disabilities in Japan, and stated the issues confronted with. Particularly at the workplace, PPS individuals need special supports from both rehabilitation medicine and occupational health services, including improved nutrition, achieving ideal body weight, regular and sensible exercise, frequent checkups, and modifying working conditions.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Cultural Context, Disability Rights, Late Effects of Polio, Quality of Life, Vocational Implications

Title: “The car is my extra legs” – Experiences of outdoor mobility amongst immigrants in Sweden with late effects of polio
Author: Helena Selander, Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Methodology, Project administration, Supervision, Validation, Visualization, Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing,1,2,* Iolanda Santos Tavares Silva, Formal analysis, Methodology, Supervision, Validation, Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing,1,3 Felicia Kjellgren, Conceptualization, Investigation, Methodology, Writing – review & editing,1 and Katharina S. Sunnerhagen, Conceptualization, Data curation, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Methodology, Project administration, Resources, Supervision, Validation, Writing – review & editing1
Wen-Jun Tu, Editor
Affiliation: 1 Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
2 The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Gothenburg, Sweden
3 Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, The Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, CHINA
Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.
* E-mail: [email protected]
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: PLoS One

Selander, H., Santos Tavares Silva, I., Kjellgren, F., & S Sunnerhagen, K. (2019). "The car is my extra legs" - Experiences of outdoor mobility amongst immigrants in Sweden with late effects of polio. PloS one, 14(10), e0224685. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0224685
Publication Year and Month: 2019 10

Abstract: Background
The aim of the study was to describe the experience of outdoor mobility among immigrants with late effects of polio living in Sweden. There is a need to understand more about this young group of persons since they often have problems with mobility and gait, but they may also face participation restrictions due to issues associated with integration into a new community and culture.

Method
A total of 14 young immigrants with late effects of polio participated and were interviewed individually. The study used a qualitative method to explore personal experiences and the interviews were analyzed through an inductive approach, using qualitative content analysis.

Results
The analysis led to a major theme; self-image and acceptance, that comprised a changeable process and experiences of cultural, social, and gender-specific barriers, but also of environmental and personal factors that impacted their outdoor mobility. By using a car, the participants felt they could come across as normal which also increased their self-esteem.

Conclusions
Independent mobility is a major enabler for ongoing employment and being able to use a car increases the chances for integration into society for young immigrants with late effects of polio. Public transport is not considered to be adequate or efficient enough due to the participants’ mobility impairments, but driving can prevent involuntary isolation and facilitate participation. A car can increase quality of life but may also be a facilitator for work and reduce the demand for societal support.

Conclusions: More work is needed on young immigrants with late effects of polio to identify their mobility needs and find solutions that could minimize barriers and help them to be more independent outdoors. This group in Sweden has often been overlooked in clinical settings and in society generally. It is important to consider the need of care and support for persons with late effects polio as the need for care has been questioned and decision makers (such as health commissioners) believe persons with late effects of polio no longer exist in Sweden. Moreover, they are not prioritized despite needing rehabilitation interventions that could increase their outdoor mobility. Independent mobility is a major enabler for ongoing employment and the ability to access a car can increase their chances for social integration. According to participants in this study, public transport is not adequate or efficient enough for their needs. For young immigrants with late effects of polio, driving can prevent involuntary isolation and facilitate participation. A car may increase quality of life and reduce the demand for societal support.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


There are currently 8 papers in this category.

Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform
Author: Appelin K, Lexell J, Månsson Lexell E
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden
Journal: Occupational Therapy International
Citation: Occupational Therapy International - Occup Ther Int. 2014 Sep;21(3):98-107. doi: 10.1002/oti.1368
Publication Year and Month: 2014 09

Abstract: The aims of this study were to describe which occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, which occupational area the occupations were related to and their level of complexity. The aims were also to describe their own perception of the importance, performance and satisfaction with these occupations. Sixty-two participants (mean age 61 years) were assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. A total of 431 occupations were reported (43% self-care, 32% productivity and 25% leisure). Two subcategories, household management (27 %) and functional mobility (23 %), represented half of all the reported occupations. Ratings for prioritized occupations (N = 300) were high for importance and generally low for performance and satisfaction. A wide variety of occupations were reported, related to both occupational areas and different levels of complexity within an occupational area. The results underscore the importance of using assessment tools that can capture both the variety and complexity of occupations. By obtaining more detailed information about occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, this will enable occupational therapists to offer targeted interventions that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations. A larger and more heterogeneous sample may enable the results to be generalized to more people with late effects of polio. Future studies should focus on methods that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations for people with late effects of polio.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Vocational implications of post-polio syndrome
Author: Elrod LM, Jabben M, Oswald G, Szirony GM
Affiliation: CARE Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
Journal: Work
Citation: Work. 2005;25(2):155-61
Publication Year and Month: 2005

Abstract: Of more than 1,000,000 survivors of poliomyelitis living in the United States, about 80% experience symptoms associated with post-polio syndrome (PPS). New weakness, fatigue, and pain are the most common symptoms that may appear years after acute polio. PPS is reported to be the most prevalent progressive neuromuscular disease in North America. The physical symptoms of PPS can be severe enough to decrease an individual's quality of life, significantly alter work function, and impose lifestyle changes. The psychological implications of battling once again with a disease that had stabilized decades ago can be devastating. Rehabilitation physicians and counselors knowledgeable of post-polio syndrome and its possible impact on employment can have a positive influence on persons with PPS.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Education, occupation, and perception of health amongst previous polio patients compared to their siblings.
Author: Farbu E, Gilhus NE.
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. [email protected]
Journal: European Journal of Neurology
Citation: 2002 May;9(3):233-41.
Publication Year and Month: 2002 05

Abstract: Patients with previous polio represent a challenge for neurological rehabilitation. We examined 168 previous polio patients and 239 of their siblings, the patients either from the 1950-1954 epidemic cohort, or from a cohort of hospital-admitted rehabilitation patients. Ninety-four paralytic patients and 74 non-paralytic patients were included. All patients and siblings answered the same questionnaires for socioeconomic and health factors and chi-square comparisons were performed. Previous polio did not affect the level of education. Both patients and siblings rated their educational options to have been good. Significantly less patients were full-time employed at the age of 40 years compared to their siblings (P=0.015). This was the result of a lower full-time employment rate amongst the paralytic patients, only 52% of this group being employed full-time. Male patients and paralytic patients reported to have experienced reduced professional options. More patients were living alone compared to their siblings (P=0.035). The perception of general health was lower amongst patients than siblings, as was assessment of total life situation and patients reported more frequently symptoms like pain and tiredness. In conclusion, previous polio had not lowered the polio patients' educational status, but fewer patients were employed full-time at the age of 40 years.

Conclusions: Previous polio had not lowered the polio patients' educational status, but fewer patients were employed full-time at the age of 40 years.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: University of Alberta Hospital Acute and Convalescent Polio Care and the Reintegration of Polio Patients into Albertan Communities, 1953–80
Author: Geraldine Huynh
Affiliation: University of Alberta
Journal: Canadian Bulletin of Medical History (CBMH)
Citation: https://doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.249-022018
Published Online: March 22, 2019
Publication Year and Month: 2019 03

Abstract: Following Canada’s largest polio epidemic in 1953, Station 67 at the University of Alberta Hospital (UAH) in Edmonton became home to patients who contracted the virus. As young as nine years old, some of these patients lived at the UAH for more than three decades. Akin to wartime services, the epidemic banded together families, patients, doctors, nurses, community members, and later respiratory, physical, and occupational therapists. The nature of the disease, the government response, and the social and economic climate dramatically affected the lived experiences of patients in Alberta’s fight against polio. Drawing on archival research and oral interviews, this article argues that it was the agency and resilience of patients, the contributions of healthcare providers to rapid developments in acute and convalescent care, and the dedication of families that were primarily responsible for the recovery and reintegration of polio patients back into the community.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Cultural Context, Disability Rights, Late Effects of Polio, Quality of Life, Vocational Implications

Title: “The car is my extra legs” – Experiences of outdoor mobility amongst immigrants in Sweden with late effects of polio
Author: Helena Selander, Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Methodology, Project administration, Supervision, Validation, Visualization, Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing,1,2,* Iolanda Santos Tavares Silva, Formal analysis, Methodology, Supervision, Validation, Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing,1,3 Felicia Kjellgren, Conceptualization, Investigation, Methodology, Writing – review & editing,1 and Katharina S. Sunnerhagen, Conceptualization, Data curation, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Methodology, Project administration, Resources, Supervision, Validation, Writing – review & editing1
Wen-Jun Tu, Editor

Affiliation: 1 Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
2 The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Gothenburg, Sweden
3 Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, The Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, CHINA
Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.
* E-mail: [email protected]
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: PLoS One

Selander, H., Santos Tavares Silva, I., Kjellgren, F., & S Sunnerhagen, K. (2019). "The car is my extra legs" - Experiences of outdoor mobility amongst immigrants in Sweden with late effects of polio. PloS one, 14(10), e0224685. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0224685
Publication Year and Month: 2019 10

Abstract: Background
The aim of the study was to describe the experience of outdoor mobility among immigrants with late effects of polio living in Sweden. There is a need to understand more about this young group of persons since they often have problems with mobility and gait, but they may also face participation restrictions due to issues associated with integration into a new community and culture.

Method
A total of 14 young immigrants with late effects of polio participated and were interviewed individually. The study used a qualitative method to explore personal experiences and the interviews were analyzed through an inductive approach, using qualitative content analysis.

Results
The analysis led to a major theme; self-image and acceptance, that comprised a changeable process and experiences of cultural, social, and gender-specific barriers, but also of environmental and personal factors that impacted their outdoor mobility. By using a car, the participants felt they could come across as normal which also increased their self-esteem.

Conclusions
Independent mobility is a major enabler for ongoing employment and being able to use a car increases the chances for integration into society for young immigrants with late effects of polio. Public transport is not considered to be adequate or efficient enough due to the participants’ mobility impairments, but driving can prevent involuntary isolation and facilitate participation. A car can increase quality of life but may also be a facilitator for work and reduce the demand for societal support.

Conclusions: More work is needed on young immigrants with late effects of polio to identify their mobility needs and find solutions that could minimize barriers and help them to be more independent outdoors. This group in Sweden has often been overlooked in clinical settings and in society generally. It is important to consider the need of care and support for persons with late effects polio as the need for care has been questioned and decision makers (such as health commissioners) believe persons with late effects of polio no longer exist in Sweden. Moreover, they are not prioritized despite needing rehabilitation interventions that could increase their outdoor mobility. Independent mobility is a major enabler for ongoing employment and the ability to access a car can increase their chances for social integration. According to participants in this study, public transport is not adequate or efficient enough for their needs. For young immigrants with late effects of polio, driving can prevent involuntary isolation and facilitate participation. A car may increase quality of life and reduce the demand for societal support.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Developing vocational rehabilitation services for people with long-term neurological conditions: Identifying facilitators and barriers to service provision
Author: Kate Hayward, Bilal A Mateen, E Diane Playford, Gail Eva
Affiliation: Therapy and Rehabilitation Services, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
Journal: British Journal of Occupational Therapy (BJOT)
Citation:
Publication Year and Month: 2019 03

Abstract: Introduction
This study aimed to understand existing vocational rehabilitation service provision in one locality in London (population 3.74 million), identify any gaps and explore reasons for this, to support service development.

Method
Using soft systems methodology to guide the research process, semi-structured interviews were completed with nine participants, who were clinicians and managers providing vocational rehabilitation within a National Health Service context. Data were analysed thematically to build a ‘rich picture’ and develop a conceptual model of vocational rehabilitation service delivery. Findings were then ratified with participants at an engagement event.

Results
The findings indicate a spectrum of vocational rehabilitation service provision for long-term neurological conditions with differing levels of funding in place. Vocational rehabilitation often takes place ‘under the radar’ and therefore the true vocational rehabilitation needs of this population, and the extent of service provision, is not known. There is inconsistency of understanding across the services as to what constitutes vocational rehabilitation and outcomes are not routinely measured.

Conclusions: For vocational rehabilitation services to develop they require appropriate funding, driven by government policy to commissioners. Clear definitions of vocational rehabilitation, collecting and sharing outcome data and effective communication across services are needed at a local level. This is expressed in a conceptual model of vocational rehabilitation service delivery.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Workplace disability management in postpolio syndrome
Author: Saeki S, Takemura J, Matsushima Y, Chisaka H, Hachisuka K
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1, Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 807-8555, Japan
Journal: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Citation: J Occup Rehabil. 2001 Dec;11(4):299-307
Publication Year and Month: 2001 12

Abstract: Postpolio syndrome (PPS) is generally defined as a clinical syndrome of new weakness, fatigue, and pain in individuals who have previously recovered from acute paralytic poliomyelitis. These new problems may lead to loss of employment as well as new deficits in instrumental activities in daily living (cleaning, washing, shopping, transportation, etc.), walking, climbing stairs, and personal assistance. We presented three cases of PPS with working disabilities in Japan, and stated the issues confronted with. Particularly at the workplace, PPS individuals need special supports from both rehabilitation medicine and occupational health services, including improved nutrition, achieving ideal body weight, regular and sensible exercise, frequent checkups, and modifying working conditions.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Overcoming barriers to work participation for patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome
Author: Ten Katen K, Beelen A, Nollet F, Frings-Dresen MH, Sluiter JK
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation
Citation: Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(6):522-9. doi: 10.3109/09638288.2010.503257. Epub 2010 Jul 12
Publication Year and Month: 2010 07

Abstract: PURPOSE: This study aimed to explore the perceived work ability of patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS), to identify barriers and factors that are impeding or conducive, respectively, to work participation, and to identify possible interventions.

METHODS: Qualitative cross-sectional interview study with 17 subjects with PPS, 12 women and 5 men, mean age 49 years (SD: 11). Semi-structured interviews were held with the subjects in their homes, with the aid of a topic list. The COREQ criteria list for qualitative research was used as guideline in design and analysis.

RESULTS: Thirteen out of 17 subjects rated their work ability six or higher on a scale from 0 to 10. Most subjects worked in an administrative, educational or managerial function. Five subjects stopped working, four worked between 0 and 20 h/week and eight worked between 20 and 40 h/week. Factors conducive to working were physical adaptations in the workplace, accessibility of the workplace and high decision latitude. Barriers to full work ability in PPS patients were high physical job demands, low social support and the symptoms of PPS, especially fatigue and pain.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that work-oriented interventions aimed at preventing PPS patients from dropping out of the workforce should primarily focus on reducing physical job demands, arranging adaptations in the workplace and increasing job control.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There are currently 8 papers in this category.

Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Developing vocational rehabilitation services for people with long-term neurological conditions: Identifying facilitators and barriers to service provision
Author: Kate Hayward, Bilal A Mateen, E Diane Playford, Gail Eva
Affiliation: Therapy and Rehabilitation Services, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
Journal: British Journal of Occupational Therapy (BJOT)
Citation:
Publication Year and Month: 2019 03

Abstract: Introduction
This study aimed to understand existing vocational rehabilitation service provision in one locality in London (population 3.74 million), identify any gaps and explore reasons for this, to support service development.

Method
Using soft systems methodology to guide the research process, semi-structured interviews were completed with nine participants, who were clinicians and managers providing vocational rehabilitation within a National Health Service context. Data were analysed thematically to build a ‘rich picture’ and develop a conceptual model of vocational rehabilitation service delivery. Findings were then ratified with participants at an engagement event.

Results
The findings indicate a spectrum of vocational rehabilitation service provision for long-term neurological conditions with differing levels of funding in place. Vocational rehabilitation often takes place ‘under the radar’ and therefore the true vocational rehabilitation needs of this population, and the extent of service provision, is not known. There is inconsistency of understanding across the services as to what constitutes vocational rehabilitation and outcomes are not routinely measured.

Conclusions: For vocational rehabilitation services to develop they require appropriate funding, driven by government policy to commissioners. Clear definitions of vocational rehabilitation, collecting and sharing outcome data and effective communication across services are needed at a local level. This is expressed in a conceptual model of vocational rehabilitation service delivery.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: University of Alberta Hospital Acute and Convalescent Polio Care and the Reintegration of Polio Patients into Albertan Communities, 1953–80
Author: Geraldine Huynh
Affiliation: University of Alberta
Journal: Canadian Bulletin of Medical History (CBMH)
Citation: https://doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.249-022018
Published Online: March 22, 2019
Publication Year and Month: 2019 03

Abstract: Following Canada’s largest polio epidemic in 1953, Station 67 at the University of Alberta Hospital (UAH) in Edmonton became home to patients who contracted the virus. As young as nine years old, some of these patients lived at the UAH for more than three decades. Akin to wartime services, the epidemic banded together families, patients, doctors, nurses, community members, and later respiratory, physical, and occupational therapists. The nature of the disease, the government response, and the social and economic climate dramatically affected the lived experiences of patients in Alberta’s fight against polio. Drawing on archival research and oral interviews, this article argues that it was the agency and resilience of patients, the contributions of healthcare providers to rapid developments in acute and convalescent care, and the dedication of families that were primarily responsible for the recovery and reintegration of polio patients back into the community.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

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Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Overcoming barriers to work participation for patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome
Author: Ten Katen K, Beelen A, Nollet F, Frings-Dresen MH, Sluiter JK
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation
Citation: Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(6):522-9. doi: 10.3109/09638288.2010.503257. Epub 2010 Jul 12
Publication Year and Month: 2010 07

Abstract: PURPOSE: This study aimed to explore the perceived work ability of patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS), to identify barriers and factors that are impeding or conducive, respectively, to work participation, and to identify possible interventions.

METHODS: Qualitative cross-sectional interview study with 17 subjects with PPS, 12 women and 5 men, mean age 49 years (SD: 11). Semi-structured interviews were held with the subjects in their homes, with the aid of a topic list. The COREQ criteria list for qualitative research was used as guideline in design and analysis.

RESULTS: Thirteen out of 17 subjects rated their work ability six or higher on a scale from 0 to 10. Most subjects worked in an administrative, educational or managerial function. Five subjects stopped working, four worked between 0 and 20 h/week and eight worked between 20 and 40 h/week. Factors conducive to working were physical adaptations in the workplace, accessibility of the workplace and high decision latitude. Barriers to full work ability in PPS patients were high physical job demands, low social support and the symptoms of PPS, especially fatigue and pain.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that work-oriented interventions aimed at preventing PPS patients from dropping out of the workforce should primarily focus on reducing physical job demands, arranging adaptations in the workplace and increasing job control.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Education, occupation, and perception of health amongst previous polio patients compared to their siblings.
Author: Farbu E, Gilhus NE.
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. [email protected]
Journal: European Journal of Neurology
Citation: 2002 May;9(3):233-41.
Publication Year and Month: 2002 05

Abstract: Patients with previous polio represent a challenge for neurological rehabilitation. We examined 168 previous polio patients and 239 of their siblings, the patients either from the 1950-1954 epidemic cohort, or from a cohort of hospital-admitted rehabilitation patients. Ninety-four paralytic patients and 74 non-paralytic patients were included. All patients and siblings answered the same questionnaires for socioeconomic and health factors and chi-square comparisons were performed. Previous polio did not affect the level of education. Both patients and siblings rated their educational options to have been good. Significantly less patients were full-time employed at the age of 40 years compared to their siblings (P=0.015). This was the result of a lower full-time employment rate amongst the paralytic patients, only 52% of this group being employed full-time. Male patients and paralytic patients reported to have experienced reduced professional options. More patients were living alone compared to their siblings (P=0.035). The perception of general health was lower amongst patients than siblings, as was assessment of total life situation and patients reported more frequently symptoms like pain and tiredness. In conclusion, previous polio had not lowered the polio patients' educational status, but fewer patients were employed full-time at the age of 40 years.

Conclusions: Previous polio had not lowered the polio patients' educational status, but fewer patients were employed full-time at the age of 40 years.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

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Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Workplace disability management in postpolio syndrome
Author: Saeki S, Takemura J, Matsushima Y, Chisaka H, Hachisuka K
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1, Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 807-8555, Japan
Journal: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Citation: J Occup Rehabil. 2001 Dec;11(4):299-307
Publication Year and Month: 2001 12

Abstract: Postpolio syndrome (PPS) is generally defined as a clinical syndrome of new weakness, fatigue, and pain in individuals who have previously recovered from acute paralytic poliomyelitis. These new problems may lead to loss of employment as well as new deficits in instrumental activities in daily living (cleaning, washing, shopping, transportation, etc.), walking, climbing stairs, and personal assistance. We presented three cases of PPS with working disabilities in Japan, and stated the issues confronted with. Particularly at the workplace, PPS individuals need special supports from both rehabilitation medicine and occupational health services, including improved nutrition, achieving ideal body weight, regular and sensible exercise, frequent checkups, and modifying working conditions.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

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Category: Cultural Context, Disability Rights, Late Effects of Polio, Quality of Life, Vocational Implications

Title: “The car is my extra legs” – Experiences of outdoor mobility amongst immigrants in Sweden with late effects of polio
Author: Helena Selander, Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Methodology, Project administration, Supervision, Validation, Visualization, Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing,1,2,* Iolanda Santos Tavares Silva, Formal analysis, Methodology, Supervision, Validation, Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing,1,3 Felicia Kjellgren, Conceptualization, Investigation, Methodology, Writing – review & editing,1 and Katharina S. Sunnerhagen, Conceptualization, Data curation, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Methodology, Project administration, Resources, Supervision, Validation, Writing – review & editing1
Wen-Jun Tu, Editor
Affiliation: 1 Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
2 The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Gothenburg, Sweden
3 Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, The Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, CHINA
Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.
* E-mail: [email protected]
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: PLoS One

Selander, H., Santos Tavares Silva, I., Kjellgren, F., & S Sunnerhagen, K. (2019). "The car is my extra legs" - Experiences of outdoor mobility amongst immigrants in Sweden with late effects of polio. PloS one, 14(10), e0224685. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0224685
Publication Year and Month: 2019 10

Abstract: Background
The aim of the study was to describe the experience of outdoor mobility among immigrants with late effects of polio living in Sweden. There is a need to understand more about this young group of persons since they often have problems with mobility and gait, but they may also face participation restrictions due to issues associated with integration into a new community and culture.

Method
A total of 14 young immigrants with late effects of polio participated and were interviewed individually. The study used a qualitative method to explore personal experiences and the interviews were analyzed through an inductive approach, using qualitative content analysis.

Results
The analysis led to a major theme; self-image and acceptance, that comprised a changeable process and experiences of cultural, social, and gender-specific barriers, but also of environmental and personal factors that impacted their outdoor mobility. By using a car, the participants felt they could come across as normal which also increased their self-esteem.

Conclusions
Independent mobility is a major enabler for ongoing employment and being able to use a car increases the chances for integration into society for young immigrants with late effects of polio. Public transport is not considered to be adequate or efficient enough due to the participants’ mobility impairments, but driving can prevent involuntary isolation and facilitate participation. A car can increase quality of life but may also be a facilitator for work and reduce the demand for societal support.

Conclusions: More work is needed on young immigrants with late effects of polio to identify their mobility needs and find solutions that could minimize barriers and help them to be more independent outdoors. This group in Sweden has often been overlooked in clinical settings and in society generally. It is important to consider the need of care and support for persons with late effects polio as the need for care has been questioned and decision makers (such as health commissioners) believe persons with late effects of polio no longer exist in Sweden. Moreover, they are not prioritized despite needing rehabilitation interventions that could increase their outdoor mobility. Independent mobility is a major enabler for ongoing employment and the ability to access a car can increase their chances for social integration. According to participants in this study, public transport is not adequate or efficient enough for their needs. For young immigrants with late effects of polio, driving can prevent involuntary isolation and facilitate participation. A car may increase quality of life and reduce the demand for societal support.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform
Author: Appelin K, Lexell J, Månsson Lexell E
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden
Journal: Occupational Therapy International
Citation: Occupational Therapy International - Occup Ther Int. 2014 Sep;21(3):98-107. doi: 10.1002/oti.1368
Publication Year and Month: 2014 09

Abstract: The aims of this study were to describe which occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, which occupational area the occupations were related to and their level of complexity. The aims were also to describe their own perception of the importance, performance and satisfaction with these occupations. Sixty-two participants (mean age 61 years) were assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. A total of 431 occupations were reported (43% self-care, 32% productivity and 25% leisure). Two subcategories, household management (27 %) and functional mobility (23 %), represented half of all the reported occupations. Ratings for prioritized occupations (N = 300) were high for importance and generally low for performance and satisfaction. A wide variety of occupations were reported, related to both occupational areas and different levels of complexity within an occupational area. The results underscore the importance of using assessment tools that can capture both the variety and complexity of occupations. By obtaining more detailed information about occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, this will enable occupational therapists to offer targeted interventions that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations. A larger and more heterogeneous sample may enable the results to be generalized to more people with late effects of polio. Future studies should focus on methods that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations for people with late effects of polio.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Vocational implications of post-polio syndrome
Author: Elrod LM, Jabben M, Oswald G, Szirony GM
Affiliation: CARE Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
Journal: Work
Citation: Work. 2005;25(2):155-61
Publication Year and Month: 2005

Abstract: Of more than 1,000,000 survivors of poliomyelitis living in the United States, about 80% experience symptoms associated with post-polio syndrome (PPS). New weakness, fatigue, and pain are the most common symptoms that may appear years after acute polio. PPS is reported to be the most prevalent progressive neuromuscular disease in North America. The physical symptoms of PPS can be severe enough to decrease an individual's quality of life, significantly alter work function, and impose lifestyle changes. The psychological implications of battling once again with a disease that had stabilized decades ago can be devastating. Rehabilitation physicians and counselors knowledgeable of post-polio syndrome and its possible impact on employment can have a positive influence on persons with PPS.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There are currently 8 papers in this category.

Category: Cultural Context, Disability Rights, Late Effects of Polio, Quality of Life, Vocational Implications

Title: “The car is my extra legs” – Experiences of outdoor mobility amongst immigrants in Sweden with late effects of polio
Author: Helena Selander, Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Methodology, Project administration, Supervision, Validation, Visualization, Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing,1,2,* Iolanda Santos Tavares Silva, Formal analysis, Methodology, Supervision, Validation, Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing,1,3 Felicia Kjellgren, Conceptualization, Investigation, Methodology, Writing – review & editing,1 and Katharina S. Sunnerhagen, Conceptualization, Data curation, Funding acquisition, Investigation, Methodology, Project administration, Resources, Supervision, Validation, Writing – review & editing1
Wen-Jun Tu, Editor
Affiliation: 1 Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
2 The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Gothenburg, Sweden
3 Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, The Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, CHINA
Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.
* E-mail: [email protected]
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: PLoS One

Selander, H., Santos Tavares Silva, I., Kjellgren, F., & S Sunnerhagen, K. (2019). "The car is my extra legs" - Experiences of outdoor mobility amongst immigrants in Sweden with late effects of polio. PloS one, 14(10), e0224685. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0224685
Publication Year and Month: 2019 10

Abstract: Background
The aim of the study was to describe the experience of outdoor mobility among immigrants with late effects of polio living in Sweden. There is a need to understand more about this young group of persons since they often have problems with mobility and gait, but they may also face participation restrictions due to issues associated with integration into a new community and culture.

Method
A total of 14 young immigrants with late effects of polio participated and were interviewed individually. The study used a qualitative method to explore personal experiences and the interviews were analyzed through an inductive approach, using qualitative content analysis.

Results
The analysis led to a major theme; self-image and acceptance, that comprised a changeable process and experiences of cultural, social, and gender-specific barriers, but also of environmental and personal factors that impacted their outdoor mobility. By using a car, the participants felt they could come across as normal which also increased their self-esteem.

Conclusions
Independent mobility is a major enabler for ongoing employment and being able to use a car increases the chances for integration into society for young immigrants with late effects of polio. Public transport is not considered to be adequate or efficient enough due to the participants’ mobility impairments, but driving can prevent involuntary isolation and facilitate participation. A car can increase quality of life but may also be a facilitator for work and reduce the demand for societal support.

Conclusions: More work is needed on young immigrants with late effects of polio to identify their mobility needs and find solutions that could minimize barriers and help them to be more independent outdoors. This group in Sweden has often been overlooked in clinical settings and in society generally. It is important to consider the need of care and support for persons with late effects polio as the need for care has been questioned and decision makers (such as health commissioners) believe persons with late effects of polio no longer exist in Sweden. Moreover, they are not prioritized despite needing rehabilitation interventions that could increase their outdoor mobility. Independent mobility is a major enabler for ongoing employment and the ability to access a car can increase their chances for social integration. According to participants in this study, public transport is not adequate or efficient enough for their needs. For young immigrants with late effects of polio, driving can prevent involuntary isolation and facilitate participation. A car may increase quality of life and reduce the demand for societal support.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Developing vocational rehabilitation services for people with long-term neurological conditions: Identifying facilitators and barriers to service provision
Author: Kate Hayward, Bilal A Mateen, E Diane Playford, Gail Eva
Affiliation: Therapy and Rehabilitation Services, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
Journal: British Journal of Occupational Therapy (BJOT)
Citation:
Publication Year and Month: 2019 03

Abstract: Introduction
This study aimed to understand existing vocational rehabilitation service provision in one locality in London (population 3.74 million), identify any gaps and explore reasons for this, to support service development.

Method
Using soft systems methodology to guide the research process, semi-structured interviews were completed with nine participants, who were clinicians and managers providing vocational rehabilitation within a National Health Service context. Data were analysed thematically to build a ‘rich picture’ and develop a conceptual model of vocational rehabilitation service delivery. Findings were then ratified with participants at an engagement event.

Results
The findings indicate a spectrum of vocational rehabilitation service provision for long-term neurological conditions with differing levels of funding in place. Vocational rehabilitation often takes place ‘under the radar’ and therefore the true vocational rehabilitation needs of this population, and the extent of service provision, is not known. There is inconsistency of understanding across the services as to what constitutes vocational rehabilitation and outcomes are not routinely measured.

Conclusions: For vocational rehabilitation services to develop they require appropriate funding, driven by government policy to commissioners. Clear definitions of vocational rehabilitation, collecting and sharing outcome data and effective communication across services are needed at a local level. This is expressed in a conceptual model of vocational rehabilitation service delivery.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: University of Alberta Hospital Acute and Convalescent Polio Care and the Reintegration of Polio Patients into Albertan Communities, 1953–80
Author: Geraldine Huynh
Affiliation: University of Alberta
Journal: Canadian Bulletin of Medical History (CBMH)
Citation: https://doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.249-022018
Published Online: March 22, 2019
Publication Year and Month: 2019 03

Abstract: Following Canada’s largest polio epidemic in 1953, Station 67 at the University of Alberta Hospital (UAH) in Edmonton became home to patients who contracted the virus. As young as nine years old, some of these patients lived at the UAH for more than three decades. Akin to wartime services, the epidemic banded together families, patients, doctors, nurses, community members, and later respiratory, physical, and occupational therapists. The nature of the disease, the government response, and the social and economic climate dramatically affected the lived experiences of patients in Alberta’s fight against polio. Drawing on archival research and oral interviews, this article argues that it was the agency and resilience of patients, the contributions of healthcare providers to rapid developments in acute and convalescent care, and the dedication of families that were primarily responsible for the recovery and reintegration of polio patients back into the community.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform
Author: Appelin K, Lexell J, Månsson Lexell E
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden
Journal: Occupational Therapy International
Citation: Occupational Therapy International - Occup Ther Int. 2014 Sep;21(3):98-107. doi: 10.1002/oti.1368
Publication Year and Month: 2014 09

Abstract: The aims of this study were to describe which occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, which occupational area the occupations were related to and their level of complexity. The aims were also to describe their own perception of the importance, performance and satisfaction with these occupations. Sixty-two participants (mean age 61 years) were assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. A total of 431 occupations were reported (43% self-care, 32% productivity and 25% leisure). Two subcategories, household management (27 %) and functional mobility (23 %), represented half of all the reported occupations. Ratings for prioritized occupations (N = 300) were high for importance and generally low for performance and satisfaction. A wide variety of occupations were reported, related to both occupational areas and different levels of complexity within an occupational area. The results underscore the importance of using assessment tools that can capture both the variety and complexity of occupations. By obtaining more detailed information about occupations that people with late effects of polio perceive difficult to perform, this will enable occupational therapists to offer targeted interventions that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations. A larger and more heterogeneous sample may enable the results to be generalized to more people with late effects of polio. Future studies should focus on methods that can facilitate engagement in meaningful and purposeful occupations for people with late effects of polio.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Overcoming barriers to work participation for patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome
Author: Ten Katen K, Beelen A, Nollet F, Frings-Dresen MH, Sluiter JK
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Journal: Disability and Rehabilitation
Citation: Disabil Rehabil. 2011;33(6):522-9. doi: 10.3109/09638288.2010.503257. Epub 2010 Jul 12
Publication Year and Month: 2010 07

Abstract: PURPOSE: This study aimed to explore the perceived work ability of patients with postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS), to identify barriers and factors that are impeding or conducive, respectively, to work participation, and to identify possible interventions.

METHODS: Qualitative cross-sectional interview study with 17 subjects with PPS, 12 women and 5 men, mean age 49 years (SD: 11). Semi-structured interviews were held with the subjects in their homes, with the aid of a topic list. The COREQ criteria list for qualitative research was used as guideline in design and analysis.

RESULTS: Thirteen out of 17 subjects rated their work ability six or higher on a scale from 0 to 10. Most subjects worked in an administrative, educational or managerial function. Five subjects stopped working, four worked between 0 and 20 h/week and eight worked between 20 and 40 h/week. Factors conducive to working were physical adaptations in the workplace, accessibility of the workplace and high decision latitude. Barriers to full work ability in PPS patients were high physical job demands, low social support and the symptoms of PPS, especially fatigue and pain.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that work-oriented interventions aimed at preventing PPS patients from dropping out of the workforce should primarily focus on reducing physical job demands, arranging adaptations in the workplace and increasing job control.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Vocational implications of post-polio syndrome
Author: Elrod LM, Jabben M, Oswald G, Szirony GM
Affiliation: CARE Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR 72204, USA
Journal: Work
Citation: Work. 2005;25(2):155-61
Publication Year and Month: 2005

Abstract: Of more than 1,000,000 survivors of poliomyelitis living in the United States, about 80% experience symptoms associated with post-polio syndrome (PPS). New weakness, fatigue, and pain are the most common symptoms that may appear years after acute polio. PPS is reported to be the most prevalent progressive neuromuscular disease in North America. The physical symptoms of PPS can be severe enough to decrease an individual's quality of life, significantly alter work function, and impose lifestyle changes. The psychological implications of battling once again with a disease that had stabilized decades ago can be devastating. Rehabilitation physicians and counselors knowledgeable of post-polio syndrome and its possible impact on employment can have a positive influence on persons with PPS.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Education, occupation, and perception of health amongst previous polio patients compared to their siblings.
Author: Farbu E, Gilhus NE.
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. [email protected]
Journal: European Journal of Neurology
Citation: 2002 May;9(3):233-41.
Publication Year and Month: 2002 05

Abstract: Patients with previous polio represent a challenge for neurological rehabilitation. We examined 168 previous polio patients and 239 of their siblings, the patients either from the 1950-1954 epidemic cohort, or from a cohort of hospital-admitted rehabilitation patients. Ninety-four paralytic patients and 74 non-paralytic patients were included. All patients and siblings answered the same questionnaires for socioeconomic and health factors and chi-square comparisons were performed. Previous polio did not affect the level of education. Both patients and siblings rated their educational options to have been good. Significantly less patients were full-time employed at the age of 40 years compared to their siblings (P=0.015). This was the result of a lower full-time employment rate amongst the paralytic patients, only 52% of this group being employed full-time. Male patients and paralytic patients reported to have experienced reduced professional options. More patients were living alone compared to their siblings (P=0.035). The perception of general health was lower amongst patients than siblings, as was assessment of total life situation and patients reported more frequently symptoms like pain and tiredness. In conclusion, previous polio had not lowered the polio patients' educational status, but fewer patients were employed full-time at the age of 40 years.

Conclusions: Previous polio had not lowered the polio patients' educational status, but fewer patients were employed full-time at the age of 40 years.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Vocational Implications

Title: Workplace disability management in postpolio syndrome
Author: Saeki S, Takemura J, Matsushima Y, Chisaka H, Hachisuka K
Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1, Iseigaoka, Yahata-nishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 807-8555, Japan
Journal: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Citation: J Occup Rehabil. 2001 Dec;11(4):299-307
Publication Year and Month: 2001 12

Abstract: Postpolio syndrome (PPS) is generally defined as a clinical syndrome of new weakness, fatigue, and pain in individuals who have previously recovered from acute paralytic poliomyelitis. These new problems may lead to loss of employment as well as new deficits in instrumental activities in daily living (cleaning, washing, shopping, transportation, etc.), walking, climbing stairs, and personal assistance. We presented three cases of PPS with working disabilities in Japan, and stated the issues confronted with. Particularly at the workplace, PPS individuals need special supports from both rehabilitation medicine and occupational health services, including improved nutrition, achieving ideal body weight, regular and sensible exercise, frequent checkups, and modifying working conditions.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There are currently 8 papers in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications