Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Late functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis
Author: D. Kidd, R.S. Howard, A.J. Williams, F.W. Heatley, C.P. Panayiotopoulos and G.T. Spencer
Affiliation: Departments of Neurology, Respiratory Medicine and Orthopaedics, the Lane-Fox Unit, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK
Journal: Post-Polio Network (NSW) Inc
Citation: QJ Med 1997; 90: 189 - 196
Publication Year and Month: 1997 01

Abstract: Many patients with previous poliomyelitis develop 'post-polio syndrome' (PPS) in which late functional deterioration follows a period of relative stability. The frequency with which PPS can be attributed to clearly defined causes remains uncertain. We reviewed 283 newly-referred patients with previous poliomyelitis seen consecutively over a 4-year period; 239 patients developed symptoms of functional deterioration at a mean of 35 (5-65) years after the paralytic illness. Functional deterioration was associated with orthopaedic disorders in 170 cases, neurological disorders in 35, respiratory disorders in 19 and other disorders in 15. Progressive post-polio muscular atrophy was not observed. Functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis is common, and associated with orthopaedic, neurological, respiratory and general medical factors which are potentially treatable.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Living with polio and postpolio syndrome in the United Kingdom
Author: Atwal A (1), Giles A, Spiliotopoulou G, Plastow N, Wilson L
Affiliation: (1) School of Health Science and Social Care, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge, Middlesex, London, UK - [email protected]

Journal: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Citation: Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Jun;27(2):238-45. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01029.x
Publication Year and Month: 2013 06

Abstract: The term Postpolio Syndrome (PPS) is used to describe new and late manifestations of poliomyelitis that occur later in life in polio survivors. Polio had been eradicated in the United Kingdom (UK) and most of Europe, although this is not the case in all countries. Research in this area has tended to focus upon the impact of polio and PPS on health status and functional health rather than its overall effect on people's lives. This study's two main aims were to explore the ways in which polio and PPS in the UK has affected the respondents' lives and to ascertain their views about how the quality of life could be improved. The two questions were as follows: (1) How has the health of people with polio and PPS affected their quality of life? (2) What would people with polio and PPS change to improve their quality of life? Deductive content analysis using existing qualitative data from a cross-sectional survey of 336 returned questionnaires from persons with polio and PPS was carried out. The average age of the participants was 54 years. Our research found that polio survivors valued social occupations and participation in family life. Our research has also shown that healthcare professionals still do not understand polio and PPS and this lack of understanding influences their clients' quality of life. Finances and accessibility of environments also influence participation in chosen occupations. Rehabilitation programmes for people with polio and PPS need to be targeted towards maintaining and improving accessible environments and participation in chosen occupations, and healthcare professionals need to ensure that persons with polio and PPS are referred to persons with specific expertise in this area.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: New problems in old polio patients: results of a survey of 539 polio survivors
Author: Halstead LS, Rossi CD
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):845-50
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: Presented are the results of a questionnaire survey on new health problems in 539 polio survivors. The most common new problems were fatigue, weakness in previously affected and unaffected muscles, muscle pain, and joint pain. The median time from polio to the onset of these problems ranged from 30 to 40 years. Factors at onset of polio most strongly associated with developing these new health problems were: being hospitalized, being over 10 years old, being on a ventilator, and having paralytic involvement of all four limbs. The differential diagnoses of these new problems, implications for treatment and areas for future research are discussed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: People living with post-polio syndrome must not be forgotten
Author: Hill T
Affiliation: British Polio Fellowship
Journal: Nursing Standard
Citation: Nurs Stand. 2015 Nov 4;30(10):30-1. doi: 10.7748/ns.30.10.30.s38
Publication Year and Month: 2015 11

Abstract: As research conducted by YouGov reveals, only 7% of people in Britain are aware of the neurological condition post-polio syndrome (PPS). The British Polio Fellowship is keen to highlight what is now an urgent need for more support for those living with PPS, from both the public and the nursing and medical community.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Polio: long-term problems
Author: Perry J, Fleming C
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):877-81
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: The most common long-term problems seen in polio are brace problems, knee recurvatum, increasing weakness due to overuse and ankle equinus. A definite increased incidence of problems is seen after the patient is more than 30 years post-polio. The basis for most of these problems is chronic mechanical strain of weak musculature and substituting ligaments. Overuse can cause increasing weakness resulting in pain and decreasing function. It is therefore important to follow polio patients closely, especially those that are more than 30 years post-polio. If signs of overuse or chronic mechanical strain are noted, treatment should not be delayed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Post-polio syndrome and risk factors in Korean polio survivors: a baseline survey by telephone interview
Author: Bang H (1), Suh JH (2), Lee SY (3), Kim K (1), Yang EJ (1), Jung SH (1), Jang SN (4), Han SJ (2), Kim WH (5), Oh MG (6), Kim JH (5), Lee SG (7), Lim JY (1)
Affiliation: (1) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; (2) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea; (3) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea; (4) Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea; (5) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Rehabilitation Center, Seoul, Korea; (6) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Jinju, Korea; (7) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University College of Medical School, Gwangju, Korea
Journal: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: Ann Rehabil Med. 2014 Oct;38(5):637-47. doi: 10.5535/arm.2014.38.5.637
Publication Year and Month: 2014 10

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To obtain information on the socioeconomic, medical, and functional status of polio survivors, and to use these results as the preliminary data for establishing the middle-aged cohort of polio survivors.

METHODS: The subjects were recruited based on the medical records of multiple hospitals and centers. They were assessed through a structured questionnaire over the phone. Post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) was identified according to the specified diagnostic criteria. Differences between polio survivors with or without PPS were evaluated, and the risk factors for PPS were analyzed by the odds ratio (OR).

RESULTS: Majority of polio survivors were middle-aged and mean age was 51.2±8.3 years. A total of 188 out of 313 polio survivors met the adopted criteria for PPS based on the symptoms, yielding a prevalence of 61.6%. Mean interval between acute poliomyelitis and the development of PPS was 38.5±11.6 years. Female gender (OR 1.82; confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.06), the age at onset of poliomyelitis (OR 1.75; CI 1.05-2.94), the use of orthoses or walking aids (OR 2.46; CI 1.44-4.20), and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance (OR 2.62; CI 1.52-4.51) represented independent risk factors for PPS.

Conclusions: We found that the majority of Korean polio survivors entered middle age with many medical, functional, and social problems. Female gender, early age of onset of poliomyelitis, the use of orthoses or walking aids, and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance were identified as the significant risk factors for PPS. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary plan should be prepared to manage polio survivors considering their need for health care services and the risk factors for late effects, such as PPS.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Psoriasis sparing the lower limb with postpoliomyelitis residual paralysis
Author: Wang TS (1), Tsai TF
Affiliation: (1) Department of Dermatology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
Journal: British Journal of Dermatology
Citation: Br J Dermatol. 2014 Aug;171(2):429-31. doi: 10.1111/bjd.12854
Publication Year and Month: 2014 08

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Risk of symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis
Author: Rekand T, Albrektsen G, Langeland N, Aarli JA
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Haukeland Hospital, Bergen, Norway
Journal: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Citation: Acta Neurol Scand. 2000 Mar;101(3):153-8
Publication Year and Month: 2000 03

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of developing symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis between polio patients and persons of similar age and sex without history of poliomyelitis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised information on 148 patients with prior poliomyelitis and 115 persons with no history of poliomyelitis. Information was obtained by questionnaire and analyzed by multiple logistic regression method.

RESULTS: The risk of experiencing two or more symptoms was significantly higher among the polio patients than among the persons without history of poliomyelitis. The elevation in risk was less pronounced in the nonparalytic group (OR = 2.35; 95% CI = 0.92-5.97) than the group with permanent muscular weakness (OR = 8.84; 95% CI =4.32-18.09).

Conclusions: Although symptoms defined in the PPS are unspecific and may occur in the general population, the risk for developing such symptoms are higher among the polio victims. The difference in risk among nonparalytic and paralytic patients may depend on the extent of motor neuron damage in the acute stage.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There are currently 8 papers in this category.

Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Living with polio and postpolio syndrome in the United Kingdom
Author: Atwal A (1), Giles A, Spiliotopoulou G, Plastow N, Wilson L
Affiliation: (1) School of Health Science and Social Care, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge, Middlesex, London, UK - [email protected]

Journal: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Citation: Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Jun;27(2):238-45. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01029.x
Publication Year and Month: 2013 06

Abstract: The term Postpolio Syndrome (PPS) is used to describe new and late manifestations of poliomyelitis that occur later in life in polio survivors. Polio had been eradicated in the United Kingdom (UK) and most of Europe, although this is not the case in all countries. Research in this area has tended to focus upon the impact of polio and PPS on health status and functional health rather than its overall effect on people's lives. This study's two main aims were to explore the ways in which polio and PPS in the UK has affected the respondents' lives and to ascertain their views about how the quality of life could be improved. The two questions were as follows: (1) How has the health of people with polio and PPS affected their quality of life? (2) What would people with polio and PPS change to improve their quality of life? Deductive content analysis using existing qualitative data from a cross-sectional survey of 336 returned questionnaires from persons with polio and PPS was carried out. The average age of the participants was 54 years. Our research found that polio survivors valued social occupations and participation in family life. Our research has also shown that healthcare professionals still do not understand polio and PPS and this lack of understanding influences their clients' quality of life. Finances and accessibility of environments also influence participation in chosen occupations. Rehabilitation programmes for people with polio and PPS need to be targeted towards maintaining and improving accessible environments and participation in chosen occupations, and healthcare professionals need to ensure that persons with polio and PPS are referred to persons with specific expertise in this area.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Post-polio syndrome and risk factors in Korean polio survivors: a baseline survey by telephone interview
Author: Bang H (1), Suh JH (2), Lee SY (3), Kim K (1), Yang EJ (1), Jung SH (1), Jang SN (4), Han SJ (2), Kim WH (5), Oh MG (6), Kim JH (5), Lee SG (7), Lim JY (1)
Affiliation: (1) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; (2) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea; (3) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea; (4) Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea; (5) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Rehabilitation Center, Seoul, Korea; (6) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Jinju, Korea; (7) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University College of Medical School, Gwangju, Korea
Journal: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: Ann Rehabil Med. 2014 Oct;38(5):637-47. doi: 10.5535/arm.2014.38.5.637
Publication Year and Month: 2014 10

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To obtain information on the socioeconomic, medical, and functional status of polio survivors, and to use these results as the preliminary data for establishing the middle-aged cohort of polio survivors.

METHODS: The subjects were recruited based on the medical records of multiple hospitals and centers. They were assessed through a structured questionnaire over the phone. Post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) was identified according to the specified diagnostic criteria. Differences between polio survivors with or without PPS were evaluated, and the risk factors for PPS were analyzed by the odds ratio (OR).

RESULTS: Majority of polio survivors were middle-aged and mean age was 51.2±8.3 years. A total of 188 out of 313 polio survivors met the adopted criteria for PPS based on the symptoms, yielding a prevalence of 61.6%. Mean interval between acute poliomyelitis and the development of PPS was 38.5±11.6 years. Female gender (OR 1.82; confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.06), the age at onset of poliomyelitis (OR 1.75; CI 1.05-2.94), the use of orthoses or walking aids (OR 2.46; CI 1.44-4.20), and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance (OR 2.62; CI 1.52-4.51) represented independent risk factors for PPS.

Conclusions: We found that the majority of Korean polio survivors entered middle age with many medical, functional, and social problems. Female gender, early age of onset of poliomyelitis, the use of orthoses or walking aids, and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance were identified as the significant risk factors for PPS. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary plan should be prepared to manage polio survivors considering their need for health care services and the risk factors for late effects, such as PPS.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Late functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis
Author: D. Kidd, R.S. Howard, A.J. Williams, F.W. Heatley, C.P. Panayiotopoulos and G.T. Spencer
Affiliation: Departments of Neurology, Respiratory Medicine and Orthopaedics, the Lane-Fox Unit, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK
Journal: Post-Polio Network (NSW) Inc
Citation: QJ Med 1997; 90: 189 - 196
Publication Year and Month: 1997 01

Abstract: Many patients with previous poliomyelitis develop 'post-polio syndrome' (PPS) in which late functional deterioration follows a period of relative stability. The frequency with which PPS can be attributed to clearly defined causes remains uncertain. We reviewed 283 newly-referred patients with previous poliomyelitis seen consecutively over a 4-year period; 239 patients developed symptoms of functional deterioration at a mean of 35 (5-65) years after the paralytic illness. Functional deterioration was associated with orthopaedic disorders in 170 cases, neurological disorders in 35, respiratory disorders in 19 and other disorders in 15. Progressive post-polio muscular atrophy was not observed. Functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis is common, and associated with orthopaedic, neurological, respiratory and general medical factors which are potentially treatable.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: New problems in old polio patients: results of a survey of 539 polio survivors
Author: Halstead LS, Rossi CD
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):845-50
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: Presented are the results of a questionnaire survey on new health problems in 539 polio survivors. The most common new problems were fatigue, weakness in previously affected and unaffected muscles, muscle pain, and joint pain. The median time from polio to the onset of these problems ranged from 30 to 40 years. Factors at onset of polio most strongly associated with developing these new health problems were: being hospitalized, being over 10 years old, being on a ventilator, and having paralytic involvement of all four limbs. The differential diagnoses of these new problems, implications for treatment and areas for future research are discussed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: People living with post-polio syndrome must not be forgotten
Author: Hill T
Affiliation: British Polio Fellowship
Journal: Nursing Standard
Citation: Nurs Stand. 2015 Nov 4;30(10):30-1. doi: 10.7748/ns.30.10.30.s38
Publication Year and Month: 2015 11

Abstract: As research conducted by YouGov reveals, only 7% of people in Britain are aware of the neurological condition post-polio syndrome (PPS). The British Polio Fellowship is keen to highlight what is now an urgent need for more support for those living with PPS, from both the public and the nursing and medical community.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Polio: long-term problems
Author: Perry J, Fleming C
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):877-81
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: The most common long-term problems seen in polio are brace problems, knee recurvatum, increasing weakness due to overuse and ankle equinus. A definite increased incidence of problems is seen after the patient is more than 30 years post-polio. The basis for most of these problems is chronic mechanical strain of weak musculature and substituting ligaments. Overuse can cause increasing weakness resulting in pain and decreasing function. It is therefore important to follow polio patients closely, especially those that are more than 30 years post-polio. If signs of overuse or chronic mechanical strain are noted, treatment should not be delayed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Risk of symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis
Author: Rekand T, Albrektsen G, Langeland N, Aarli JA
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Haukeland Hospital, Bergen, Norway
Journal: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Citation: Acta Neurol Scand. 2000 Mar;101(3):153-8
Publication Year and Month: 2000 03

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of developing symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis between polio patients and persons of similar age and sex without history of poliomyelitis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised information on 148 patients with prior poliomyelitis and 115 persons with no history of poliomyelitis. Information was obtained by questionnaire and analyzed by multiple logistic regression method.

RESULTS: The risk of experiencing two or more symptoms was significantly higher among the polio patients than among the persons without history of poliomyelitis. The elevation in risk was less pronounced in the nonparalytic group (OR = 2.35; 95% CI = 0.92-5.97) than the group with permanent muscular weakness (OR = 8.84; 95% CI =4.32-18.09).

Conclusions: Although symptoms defined in the PPS are unspecific and may occur in the general population, the risk for developing such symptoms are higher among the polio victims. The difference in risk among nonparalytic and paralytic patients may depend on the extent of motor neuron damage in the acute stage.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Psoriasis sparing the lower limb with postpoliomyelitis residual paralysis
Author: Wang TS (1), Tsai TF
Affiliation: (1) Department of Dermatology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
Journal: British Journal of Dermatology
Citation: Br J Dermatol. 2014 Aug;171(2):429-31. doi: 10.1111/bjd.12854
Publication Year and Month: 2014 08

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


There are currently 8 papers in this category.

Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Risk of symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis
Author: Rekand T, Albrektsen G, Langeland N, Aarli JA
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Haukeland Hospital, Bergen, Norway
Journal: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Citation: Acta Neurol Scand. 2000 Mar;101(3):153-8
Publication Year and Month: 2000 03

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of developing symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis between polio patients and persons of similar age and sex without history of poliomyelitis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised information on 148 patients with prior poliomyelitis and 115 persons with no history of poliomyelitis. Information was obtained by questionnaire and analyzed by multiple logistic regression method.

RESULTS: The risk of experiencing two or more symptoms was significantly higher among the polio patients than among the persons without history of poliomyelitis. The elevation in risk was less pronounced in the nonparalytic group (OR = 2.35; 95% CI = 0.92-5.97) than the group with permanent muscular weakness (OR = 8.84; 95% CI =4.32-18.09).

Conclusions: Although symptoms defined in the PPS are unspecific and may occur in the general population, the risk for developing such symptoms are higher among the polio victims. The difference in risk among nonparalytic and paralytic patients may depend on the extent of motor neuron damage in the acute stage.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Post-polio syndrome and risk factors in Korean polio survivors: a baseline survey by telephone interview
Author: Bang H (1), Suh JH (2), Lee SY (3), Kim K (1), Yang EJ (1), Jung SH (1), Jang SN (4), Han SJ (2), Kim WH (5), Oh MG (6), Kim JH (5), Lee SG (7), Lim JY (1)
Affiliation: (1) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; (2) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea; (3) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea; (4) Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea; (5) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Rehabilitation Center, Seoul, Korea; (6) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Jinju, Korea; (7) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University College of Medical School, Gwangju, Korea
Journal: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: Ann Rehabil Med. 2014 Oct;38(5):637-47. doi: 10.5535/arm.2014.38.5.637
Publication Year and Month: 2014 10

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To obtain information on the socioeconomic, medical, and functional status of polio survivors, and to use these results as the preliminary data for establishing the middle-aged cohort of polio survivors.

METHODS: The subjects were recruited based on the medical records of multiple hospitals and centers. They were assessed through a structured questionnaire over the phone. Post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) was identified according to the specified diagnostic criteria. Differences between polio survivors with or without PPS were evaluated, and the risk factors for PPS were analyzed by the odds ratio (OR).

RESULTS: Majority of polio survivors were middle-aged and mean age was 51.2±8.3 years. A total of 188 out of 313 polio survivors met the adopted criteria for PPS based on the symptoms, yielding a prevalence of 61.6%. Mean interval between acute poliomyelitis and the development of PPS was 38.5±11.6 years. Female gender (OR 1.82; confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.06), the age at onset of poliomyelitis (OR 1.75; CI 1.05-2.94), the use of orthoses or walking aids (OR 2.46; CI 1.44-4.20), and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance (OR 2.62; CI 1.52-4.51) represented independent risk factors for PPS.

Conclusions: We found that the majority of Korean polio survivors entered middle age with many medical, functional, and social problems. Female gender, early age of onset of poliomyelitis, the use of orthoses or walking aids, and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance were identified as the significant risk factors for PPS. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary plan should be prepared to manage polio survivors considering their need for health care services and the risk factors for late effects, such as PPS.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Psoriasis sparing the lower limb with postpoliomyelitis residual paralysis
Author: Wang TS (1), Tsai TF
Affiliation: (1) Department of Dermatology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
Journal: British Journal of Dermatology
Citation: Br J Dermatol. 2014 Aug;171(2):429-31. doi: 10.1111/bjd.12854
Publication Year and Month: 2014 08

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: People living with post-polio syndrome must not be forgotten
Author: Hill T
Affiliation: British Polio Fellowship
Journal: Nursing Standard
Citation: Nurs Stand. 2015 Nov 4;30(10):30-1. doi: 10.7748/ns.30.10.30.s38
Publication Year and Month: 2015 11

Abstract: As research conducted by YouGov reveals, only 7% of people in Britain are aware of the neurological condition post-polio syndrome (PPS). The British Polio Fellowship is keen to highlight what is now an urgent need for more support for those living with PPS, from both the public and the nursing and medical community.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: New problems in old polio patients: results of a survey of 539 polio survivors
Author: Halstead LS, Rossi CD
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):845-50
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: Presented are the results of a questionnaire survey on new health problems in 539 polio survivors. The most common new problems were fatigue, weakness in previously affected and unaffected muscles, muscle pain, and joint pain. The median time from polio to the onset of these problems ranged from 30 to 40 years. Factors at onset of polio most strongly associated with developing these new health problems were: being hospitalized, being over 10 years old, being on a ventilator, and having paralytic involvement of all four limbs. The differential diagnoses of these new problems, implications for treatment and areas for future research are discussed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Polio: long-term problems
Author: Perry J, Fleming C
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):877-81
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: The most common long-term problems seen in polio are brace problems, knee recurvatum, increasing weakness due to overuse and ankle equinus. A definite increased incidence of problems is seen after the patient is more than 30 years post-polio. The basis for most of these problems is chronic mechanical strain of weak musculature and substituting ligaments. Overuse can cause increasing weakness resulting in pain and decreasing function. It is therefore important to follow polio patients closely, especially those that are more than 30 years post-polio. If signs of overuse or chronic mechanical strain are noted, treatment should not be delayed.

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Late functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis
Author: D. Kidd, R.S. Howard, A.J. Williams, F.W. Heatley, C.P. Panayiotopoulos and G.T. Spencer
Affiliation: Departments of Neurology, Respiratory Medicine and Orthopaedics, the Lane-Fox Unit, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK
Journal: Post-Polio Network (NSW) Inc
Citation: QJ Med 1997; 90: 189 - 196
Publication Year and Month: 1997 01

Abstract: Many patients with previous poliomyelitis develop 'post-polio syndrome' (PPS) in which late functional deterioration follows a period of relative stability. The frequency with which PPS can be attributed to clearly defined causes remains uncertain. We reviewed 283 newly-referred patients with previous poliomyelitis seen consecutively over a 4-year period; 239 patients developed symptoms of functional deterioration at a mean of 35 (5-65) years after the paralytic illness. Functional deterioration was associated with orthopaedic disorders in 170 cases, neurological disorders in 35, respiratory disorders in 19 and other disorders in 15. Progressive post-polio muscular atrophy was not observed. Functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis is common, and associated with orthopaedic, neurological, respiratory and general medical factors which are potentially treatable.

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Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Living with polio and postpolio syndrome in the United Kingdom
Author: Atwal A (1), Giles A, Spiliotopoulou G, Plastow N, Wilson L
Affiliation: (1) School of Health Science and Social Care, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge, Middlesex, London, UK - [email protected]

Journal: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Citation: Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Jun;27(2):238-45. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01029.x
Publication Year and Month: 2013 06

Abstract: The term Postpolio Syndrome (PPS) is used to describe new and late manifestations of poliomyelitis that occur later in life in polio survivors. Polio had been eradicated in the United Kingdom (UK) and most of Europe, although this is not the case in all countries. Research in this area has tended to focus upon the impact of polio and PPS on health status and functional health rather than its overall effect on people's lives. This study's two main aims were to explore the ways in which polio and PPS in the UK has affected the respondents' lives and to ascertain their views about how the quality of life could be improved. The two questions were as follows: (1) How has the health of people with polio and PPS affected their quality of life? (2) What would people with polio and PPS change to improve their quality of life? Deductive content analysis using existing qualitative data from a cross-sectional survey of 336 returned questionnaires from persons with polio and PPS was carried out. The average age of the participants was 54 years. Our research found that polio survivors valued social occupations and participation in family life. Our research has also shown that healthcare professionals still do not understand polio and PPS and this lack of understanding influences their clients' quality of life. Finances and accessibility of environments also influence participation in chosen occupations. Rehabilitation programmes for people with polio and PPS need to be targeted towards maintaining and improving accessible environments and participation in chosen occupations, and healthcare professionals need to ensure that persons with polio and PPS are referred to persons with specific expertise in this area.

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Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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There are currently 8 papers in this category.

Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: People living with post-polio syndrome must not be forgotten
Author: Hill T
Affiliation: British Polio Fellowship
Journal: Nursing Standard
Citation: Nurs Stand. 2015 Nov 4;30(10):30-1. doi: 10.7748/ns.30.10.30.s38
Publication Year and Month: 2015 11

Abstract: As research conducted by YouGov reveals, only 7% of people in Britain are aware of the neurological condition post-polio syndrome (PPS). The British Polio Fellowship is keen to highlight what is now an urgent need for more support for those living with PPS, from both the public and the nursing and medical community.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Post-polio syndrome and risk factors in Korean polio survivors: a baseline survey by telephone interview
Author: Bang H (1), Suh JH (2), Lee SY (3), Kim K (1), Yang EJ (1), Jung SH (1), Jang SN (4), Han SJ (2), Kim WH (5), Oh MG (6), Kim JH (5), Lee SG (7), Lim JY (1)
Affiliation: (1) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; (2) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea; (3) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea; (4) Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea; (5) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Rehabilitation Center, Seoul, Korea; (6) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Jinju, Korea; (7) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University College of Medical School, Gwangju, Korea
Journal: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: Ann Rehabil Med. 2014 Oct;38(5):637-47. doi: 10.5535/arm.2014.38.5.637
Publication Year and Month: 2014 10

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To obtain information on the socioeconomic, medical, and functional status of polio survivors, and to use these results as the preliminary data for establishing the middle-aged cohort of polio survivors.

METHODS: The subjects were recruited based on the medical records of multiple hospitals and centers. They were assessed through a structured questionnaire over the phone. Post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) was identified according to the specified diagnostic criteria. Differences between polio survivors with or without PPS were evaluated, and the risk factors for PPS were analyzed by the odds ratio (OR).

RESULTS: Majority of polio survivors were middle-aged and mean age was 51.2±8.3 years. A total of 188 out of 313 polio survivors met the adopted criteria for PPS based on the symptoms, yielding a prevalence of 61.6%. Mean interval between acute poliomyelitis and the development of PPS was 38.5±11.6 years. Female gender (OR 1.82; confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.06), the age at onset of poliomyelitis (OR 1.75; CI 1.05-2.94), the use of orthoses or walking aids (OR 2.46; CI 1.44-4.20), and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance (OR 2.62; CI 1.52-4.51) represented independent risk factors for PPS.

Conclusions: We found that the majority of Korean polio survivors entered middle age with many medical, functional, and social problems. Female gender, early age of onset of poliomyelitis, the use of orthoses or walking aids, and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance were identified as the significant risk factors for PPS. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary plan should be prepared to manage polio survivors considering their need for health care services and the risk factors for late effects, such as PPS.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Psoriasis sparing the lower limb with postpoliomyelitis residual paralysis
Author: Wang TS (1), Tsai TF
Affiliation: (1) Department of Dermatology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
Journal: British Journal of Dermatology
Citation: Br J Dermatol. 2014 Aug;171(2):429-31. doi: 10.1111/bjd.12854
Publication Year and Month: 2014 08

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Living with polio and postpolio syndrome in the United Kingdom
Author: Atwal A (1), Giles A, Spiliotopoulou G, Plastow N, Wilson L
Affiliation: (1) School of Health Science and Social Care, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge, Middlesex, London, UK - [email protected]

Journal: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Citation: Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Jun;27(2):238-45. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01029.x
Publication Year and Month: 2013 06

Abstract: The term Postpolio Syndrome (PPS) is used to describe new and late manifestations of poliomyelitis that occur later in life in polio survivors. Polio had been eradicated in the United Kingdom (UK) and most of Europe, although this is not the case in all countries. Research in this area has tended to focus upon the impact of polio and PPS on health status and functional health rather than its overall effect on people's lives. This study's two main aims were to explore the ways in which polio and PPS in the UK has affected the respondents' lives and to ascertain their views about how the quality of life could be improved. The two questions were as follows: (1) How has the health of people with polio and PPS affected their quality of life? (2) What would people with polio and PPS change to improve their quality of life? Deductive content analysis using existing qualitative data from a cross-sectional survey of 336 returned questionnaires from persons with polio and PPS was carried out. The average age of the participants was 54 years. Our research found that polio survivors valued social occupations and participation in family life. Our research has also shown that healthcare professionals still do not understand polio and PPS and this lack of understanding influences their clients' quality of life. Finances and accessibility of environments also influence participation in chosen occupations. Rehabilitation programmes for people with polio and PPS need to be targeted towards maintaining and improving accessible environments and participation in chosen occupations, and healthcare professionals need to ensure that persons with polio and PPS are referred to persons with specific expertise in this area.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Risk of symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis
Author: Rekand T, Albrektsen G, Langeland N, Aarli JA
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Haukeland Hospital, Bergen, Norway
Journal: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Citation: Acta Neurol Scand. 2000 Mar;101(3):153-8
Publication Year and Month: 2000 03

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of developing symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis between polio patients and persons of similar age and sex without history of poliomyelitis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised information on 148 patients with prior poliomyelitis and 115 persons with no history of poliomyelitis. Information was obtained by questionnaire and analyzed by multiple logistic regression method.

RESULTS: The risk of experiencing two or more symptoms was significantly higher among the polio patients than among the persons without history of poliomyelitis. The elevation in risk was less pronounced in the nonparalytic group (OR = 2.35; 95% CI = 0.92-5.97) than the group with permanent muscular weakness (OR = 8.84; 95% CI =4.32-18.09).

Conclusions: Although symptoms defined in the PPS are unspecific and may occur in the general population, the risk for developing such symptoms are higher among the polio victims. The difference in risk among nonparalytic and paralytic patients may depend on the extent of motor neuron damage in the acute stage.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Late functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis
Author: D. Kidd, R.S. Howard, A.J. Williams, F.W. Heatley, C.P. Panayiotopoulos and G.T. Spencer
Affiliation: Departments of Neurology, Respiratory Medicine and Orthopaedics, the Lane-Fox Unit, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK
Journal: Post-Polio Network (NSW) Inc
Citation: QJ Med 1997; 90: 189 - 196
Publication Year and Month: 1997 01

Abstract: Many patients with previous poliomyelitis develop 'post-polio syndrome' (PPS) in which late functional deterioration follows a period of relative stability. The frequency with which PPS can be attributed to clearly defined causes remains uncertain. We reviewed 283 newly-referred patients with previous poliomyelitis seen consecutively over a 4-year period; 239 patients developed symptoms of functional deterioration at a mean of 35 (5-65) years after the paralytic illness. Functional deterioration was associated with orthopaedic disorders in 170 cases, neurological disorders in 35, respiratory disorders in 19 and other disorders in 15. Progressive post-polio muscular atrophy was not observed. Functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis is common, and associated with orthopaedic, neurological, respiratory and general medical factors which are potentially treatable.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: New problems in old polio patients: results of a survey of 539 polio survivors
Author: Halstead LS, Rossi CD
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):845-50
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: Presented are the results of a questionnaire survey on new health problems in 539 polio survivors. The most common new problems were fatigue, weakness in previously affected and unaffected muscles, muscle pain, and joint pain. The median time from polio to the onset of these problems ranged from 30 to 40 years. Factors at onset of polio most strongly associated with developing these new health problems were: being hospitalized, being over 10 years old, being on a ventilator, and having paralytic involvement of all four limbs. The differential diagnoses of these new problems, implications for treatment and areas for future research are discussed.

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Polio: long-term problems
Author: Perry J, Fleming C
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):877-81
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: The most common long-term problems seen in polio are brace problems, knee recurvatum, increasing weakness due to overuse and ankle equinus. A definite increased incidence of problems is seen after the patient is more than 30 years post-polio. The basis for most of these problems is chronic mechanical strain of weak musculature and substituting ligaments. Overuse can cause increasing weakness resulting in pain and decreasing function. It is therefore important to follow polio patients closely, especially those that are more than 30 years post-polio. If signs of overuse or chronic mechanical strain are noted, treatment should not be delayed.

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There are currently 8 papers in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications