Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Assistive Technology, Late Effects of Polio

Title: Coping with a Second Disability: Implications of the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Occupational Therapists
Author: Mary Westbrook, Lynette McDowell
Affiliation: Macquarie University, Sydney. Australia
Journal: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
Citation: 38(2):83 - 91
Publication Year and Month: 2010 08

Abstract: The long term effects of many physical disabilities have only recently begun to be appreciated. For people who have lived for years with what they thought to be stable conditions, the onset of secondary disabilities may be associated with considerable problems and distress. A questionnaire survey of 324 people with poliomyelitis revealed the occurrence of late effects in 94% of respondents. The majority reported increased weakness, pain and fatigue, problems in carrying out daily living activities and difficulties in obtaining appropriate health care. Although occupational therapists were less likely to be consulted than other professionals, they received one of the highest satisfaction ratings from clients.

Conclusions: Discussion of case studies indicates ways in which occupational therapists can provide symptom relief and enable clients to maintain valued roles. As the survival rates of people with disabilities increase there is a need for greater awareness of, and research into, the late effects of disability.

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Experiences and perspectives of patients with post-polio syndrome and therapists with exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy
Author: Minne Bakker, Karen Schipper, Fieke S. Koopman, Frans Nollet and Tineke A. Abma
Affiliation: Department of Medical Humanities, EMGO+ Institute, VU Medical Center
(VUmc), Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Journal: BioMed Central Neurology
Citation: BMC Neurology (2016) 16:23
Publication Year and Month: 2016

Abstract: Background: Many persons affected with poliomyelitis develop post-polio syndrome (PPS) later in their life.
Recently, the effectiveness of Exercise Therapy (ET) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for PPS has been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial, but did not show a decrease in fatigue or improvement in secondary endpoints like Quality of Life and self-perceived activity limitations. The aim of this explorative study was to gain insight in the perceived effects and experiences of the interventions from the perspectives of the patients and
therapists.
Methods: Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 17 patients and 7 therapists. All participants were involved in the trial. A thematic analysis of the data was performed.
Results: Some patients experienced a short term enhanced endurance and a better use of energy during the day. However, in general patients did not experience a long lasting reduction of fatigue from the CBT or ET. Mainly patients of the CBT, but also some patients of the ET described an increase of self-esteem and self-acceptance. As a result, patients were sometimes better able to perform physical activities during the day. In contrast to the CBT, the
ET was in general perceived by the patients as an intensive therapy, which was difficult to fit into their daily routine. Therapists of both the CBT and the ET struggled with a low intrinsic motivation of the patients in the study.
This made it sometimes difficult for the therapists to follow the protocol.

Conclusions: Conclusion: Confirming the negative quantitative study outcome, the qualitative results did not demonstrate lasting effects on fatigue. Patients did, however, experience some benefits on self-esteem and acceptance of the disease. This study showed that it is of great importance to work with feasible interventions; they should fit the patients’ needs on a practical (fit into their daily routine) and mental (fit their need for support) level.

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Late functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis
Author: D. Kidd, R.S. Howard, A.J. Williams, F.W. Heatley, C.P. Panayiotopoulos and G.T. Spencer
Affiliation: Departments of Neurology, Respiratory Medicine and Orthopaedics, the Lane-Fox Unit, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK
Journal: Post-Polio Network (NSW) Inc
Citation: QJ Med 1997; 90: 189 - 196
Publication Year and Month: 1997 01

Abstract: Many patients with previous poliomyelitis develop 'post-polio syndrome' (PPS) in which late functional deterioration follows a period of relative stability. The frequency with which PPS can be attributed to clearly defined causes remains uncertain. We reviewed 283 newly-referred patients with previous poliomyelitis seen consecutively over a 4-year period; 239 patients developed symptoms of functional deterioration at a mean of 35 (5-65) years after the paralytic illness. Functional deterioration was associated with orthopaedic disorders in 170 cases, neurological disorders in 35, respiratory disorders in 19 and other disorders in 15. Progressive post-polio muscular atrophy was not observed. Functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis is common, and associated with orthopaedic, neurological, respiratory and general medical factors which are potentially treatable.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Living with polio and postpolio syndrome in the United Kingdom
Author: Atwal A (1), Giles A, Spiliotopoulou G, Plastow N, Wilson L
Affiliation: (1) School of Health Science and Social Care, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge, Middlesex, London, UK - [email protected]

Journal: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Citation: Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Jun;27(2):238-45. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01029.x
Publication Year and Month: 2013 06

Abstract: The term Postpolio Syndrome (PPS) is used to describe new and late manifestations of poliomyelitis that occur later in life in polio survivors. Polio had been eradicated in the United Kingdom (UK) and most of Europe, although this is not the case in all countries. Research in this area has tended to focus upon the impact of polio and PPS on health status and functional health rather than its overall effect on people's lives. This study's two main aims were to explore the ways in which polio and PPS in the UK has affected the respondents' lives and to ascertain their views about how the quality of life could be improved. The two questions were as follows: (1) How has the health of people with polio and PPS affected their quality of life? (2) What would people with polio and PPS change to improve their quality of life? Deductive content analysis using existing qualitative data from a cross-sectional survey of 336 returned questionnaires from persons with polio and PPS was carried out. The average age of the participants was 54 years. Our research found that polio survivors valued social occupations and participation in family life. Our research has also shown that healthcare professionals still do not understand polio and PPS and this lack of understanding influences their clients' quality of life. Finances and accessibility of environments also influence participation in chosen occupations. Rehabilitation programmes for people with polio and PPS need to be targeted towards maintaining and improving accessible environments and participation in chosen occupations, and healthcare professionals need to ensure that persons with polio and PPS are referred to persons with specific expertise in this area.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: New problems in old polio patients: results of a survey of 539 polio survivors
Author: Halstead LS, Rossi CD
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):845-50
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: Presented are the results of a questionnaire survey on new health problems in 539 polio survivors. The most common new problems were fatigue, weakness in previously affected and unaffected muscles, muscle pain, and joint pain. The median time from polio to the onset of these problems ranged from 30 to 40 years. Factors at onset of polio most strongly associated with developing these new health problems were: being hospitalized, being over 10 years old, being on a ventilator, and having paralytic involvement of all four limbs. The differential diagnoses of these new problems, implications for treatment and areas for future research are discussed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: People living with post-polio syndrome must not be forgotten
Author: Hill T
Affiliation: British Polio Fellowship
Journal: Nursing Standard
Citation: Nurs Stand. 2015 Nov 4;30(10):30-1. doi: 10.7748/ns.30.10.30.s38
Publication Year and Month: 2015 11

Abstract: As research conducted by YouGov reveals, only 7% of people in Britain are aware of the neurological condition post-polio syndrome (PPS). The British Polio Fellowship is keen to highlight what is now an urgent need for more support for those living with PPS, from both the public and the nursing and medical community.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Polio: long-term problems
Author: Perry J, Fleming C
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):877-81
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: The most common long-term problems seen in polio are brace problems, knee recurvatum, increasing weakness due to overuse and ankle equinus. A definite increased incidence of problems is seen after the patient is more than 30 years post-polio. The basis for most of these problems is chronic mechanical strain of weak musculature and substituting ligaments. Overuse can cause increasing weakness resulting in pain and decreasing function. It is therefore important to follow polio patients closely, especially those that are more than 30 years post-polio. If signs of overuse or chronic mechanical strain are noted, treatment should not be delayed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Post-polio syndrome and risk factors in Korean polio survivors: a baseline survey by telephone interview
Author: Bang H (1), Suh JH (2), Lee SY (3), Kim K (1), Yang EJ (1), Jung SH (1), Jang SN (4), Han SJ (2), Kim WH (5), Oh MG (6), Kim JH (5), Lee SG (7), Lim JY (1)
Affiliation: (1) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; (2) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea; (3) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea; (4) Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea; (5) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Rehabilitation Center, Seoul, Korea; (6) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Jinju, Korea; (7) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University College of Medical School, Gwangju, Korea
Journal: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: Ann Rehabil Med. 2014 Oct;38(5):637-47. doi: 10.5535/arm.2014.38.5.637
Publication Year and Month: 2014 10

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To obtain information on the socioeconomic, medical, and functional status of polio survivors, and to use these results as the preliminary data for establishing the middle-aged cohort of polio survivors.

METHODS: The subjects were recruited based on the medical records of multiple hospitals and centers. They were assessed through a structured questionnaire over the phone. Post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) was identified according to the specified diagnostic criteria. Differences between polio survivors with or without PPS were evaluated, and the risk factors for PPS were analyzed by the odds ratio (OR).

RESULTS: Majority of polio survivors were middle-aged and mean age was 51.2±8.3 years. A total of 188 out of 313 polio survivors met the adopted criteria for PPS based on the symptoms, yielding a prevalence of 61.6%. Mean interval between acute poliomyelitis and the development of PPS was 38.5±11.6 years. Female gender (OR 1.82; confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.06), the age at onset of poliomyelitis (OR 1.75; CI 1.05-2.94), the use of orthoses or walking aids (OR 2.46; CI 1.44-4.20), and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance (OR 2.62; CI 1.52-4.51) represented independent risk factors for PPS.

Conclusions: We found that the majority of Korean polio survivors entered middle age with many medical, functional, and social problems. Female gender, early age of onset of poliomyelitis, the use of orthoses or walking aids, and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance were identified as the significant risk factors for PPS. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary plan should be prepared to manage polio survivors considering their need for health care services and the risk factors for late effects, such as PPS.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Prevalence and risk factors of post-polio syndrome in a cohort of polio survivors.
Author: Paolo Ragonese, Brigida Fierro, Giuseppe Salemi, Giovanna Randisi, Daniela Buffa, Marco D'Amelio, Antonella Aloisio, Giovanni Savettieri
Affiliation: Dipartimento di Neurologia, Oftalmologia, Otorinolaringoiatria e Psichiatria, Università di Palermo, Italy.
Journal: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Citation: 2005 Sep 15;236(1-2):31-5.
Publication Year and Month: 2005 09

Abstract: OBJECTIVE:
To investigate frequency and associated factors of post polio syndrome (PPS) in an Italian cohort of people with prior poliomyelitis.

METHODS:
We screened subjects admitted for poliomyelitis at the paediatric hospital of the University of Palermo during the time frame 1945-1960. Patients who developed PPS were identified through a structured questionnaire and a neurologic examination. PPS diagnosis was made according to specified diagnostic criteria. Frequency of PPS was calculated in the selected cohort of polio survivors. The association with the investigated risk factors (sex, age at onset of polio, extension and severity of polio, education, associated diseases, cigarette smoking, trauma, polio vaccination) was analysed by the calculation of the odds ratio.

RESULTS:
Forty-eight participants met the adopted diagnostic criteria for PPS, giving a prevalence of 31.0%. The prevalence rate was significantly higher in women than in men (p=0.02). Logistic regression analyses revealed a significant inverse association with onset of poliomyelitis at over 12 months of age (OR 0.33; CI 0.14-0.79) a higher degree of education (OR 0.20; CI 0.07-0.79), and a significant association with the presence of other diseases (OR 9.86; CI 3.69-26.34).

Conclusions: CONCLUSIONS:
In our survey one-third of patients with prior poliomyelitis had PPS. Higher age at onset of poliomyelitis is inversely associated with PPS. The association with other diseases may indicate that a chronic physical stress, particularly in already weak motor units, can contribute to the development of signs and symptoms of PPS. Our results also suggest the impact of socio-economic conditions on the risk of PPS.

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Psoriasis sparing the lower limb with postpoliomyelitis residual paralysis
Author: Wang TS (1), Tsai TF
Affiliation: (1) Department of Dermatology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
Journal: British Journal of Dermatology
Citation: Br J Dermatol. 2014 Aug;171(2):429-31. doi: 10.1111/bjd.12854
Publication Year and Month: 2014 08

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Risk of symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis
Author: Rekand T, Albrektsen G, Langeland N, Aarli JA
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Haukeland Hospital, Bergen, Norway
Journal: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Citation: Acta Neurol Scand. 2000 Mar;101(3):153-8
Publication Year and Month: 2000 03

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of developing symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis between polio patients and persons of similar age and sex without history of poliomyelitis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised information on 148 patients with prior poliomyelitis and 115 persons with no history of poliomyelitis. Information was obtained by questionnaire and analyzed by multiple logistic regression method.

RESULTS: The risk of experiencing two or more symptoms was significantly higher among the polio patients than among the persons without history of poliomyelitis. The elevation in risk was less pronounced in the nonparalytic group (OR = 2.35; 95% CI = 0.92-5.97) than the group with permanent muscular weakness (OR = 8.84; 95% CI =4.32-18.09).

Conclusions: Although symptoms defined in the PPS are unspecific and may occur in the general population, the risk for developing such symptoms are higher among the polio victims. The difference in risk among nonparalytic and paralytic patients may depend on the extent of motor neuron damage in the acute stage.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Three case studies of late diagnoses of polio in Australian adults
Author: C.Formby, D.Currie
Affiliation: St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Polio Services Victoria, Fitzroy, Australia
Journal: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: Volume 61, Supplement, July 2018, Page e272
Publication Year and Month: 2018 07

Abstract: Introduction/Background
Polio Services Victoria (PSV) is a publicly funded organization; anyone with a history of polio residing in Australia may be seen by the service. The majority of patients referred to the service were diagnosed with polio shortly after they were infected with the virus, for most this was in early childhood and ranges from two to eight decades ago. In the past 18 months three patients were referred to PSV with untypically late diagnoses of polio, two of which were sisters. All were born in Australia between 1930 and 1950 and are considered to have acquired their infection in Australia during their early childhood. The three were able to live relatively uneventful lives however their verbal histories indicate suspicion of polio during their childhood medical examinations in school, but ultimately no formal diagnosis was made at that time. In later life, symptoms characteristic of the late effects of polio emerged. In combination with imaging and nerve conduction studies these symptoms were diagnosed as being the result of a likely childhood infection of polio. Their current and future management plans are typical of that seen regularly within the service with the patients reporting their main problems as being:

–pain;

–fatigue;

–increasing muscle atrophy and associated weakness.

These three cases highlight that although Australia, like most of the world, holds polio free status there may still be further undiagnosed cases. Polio should be considered as a differential diagnosis for patients presenting with any of the cardinal signs and symptoms of late effects of polio who have resided in a country during a time prior to polio eradication. Special consideration should be given where a sibling or close relative was diagnosed with polio.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

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There are currently 12 papers in this category.

Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Living with polio and postpolio syndrome in the United Kingdom
Author: Atwal A (1), Giles A, Spiliotopoulou G, Plastow N, Wilson L
Affiliation: (1) School of Health Science and Social Care, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge, Middlesex, London, UK - [email protected]

Journal: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Citation: Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Jun;27(2):238-45. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01029.x
Publication Year and Month: 2013 06

Abstract: The term Postpolio Syndrome (PPS) is used to describe new and late manifestations of poliomyelitis that occur later in life in polio survivors. Polio had been eradicated in the United Kingdom (UK) and most of Europe, although this is not the case in all countries. Research in this area has tended to focus upon the impact of polio and PPS on health status and functional health rather than its overall effect on people's lives. This study's two main aims were to explore the ways in which polio and PPS in the UK has affected the respondents' lives and to ascertain their views about how the quality of life could be improved. The two questions were as follows: (1) How has the health of people with polio and PPS affected their quality of life? (2) What would people with polio and PPS change to improve their quality of life? Deductive content analysis using existing qualitative data from a cross-sectional survey of 336 returned questionnaires from persons with polio and PPS was carried out. The average age of the participants was 54 years. Our research found that polio survivors valued social occupations and participation in family life. Our research has also shown that healthcare professionals still do not understand polio and PPS and this lack of understanding influences their clients' quality of life. Finances and accessibility of environments also influence participation in chosen occupations. Rehabilitation programmes for people with polio and PPS need to be targeted towards maintaining and improving accessible environments and participation in chosen occupations, and healthcare professionals need to ensure that persons with polio and PPS are referred to persons with specific expertise in this area.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Post-polio syndrome and risk factors in Korean polio survivors: a baseline survey by telephone interview
Author: Bang H (1), Suh JH (2), Lee SY (3), Kim K (1), Yang EJ (1), Jung SH (1), Jang SN (4), Han SJ (2), Kim WH (5), Oh MG (6), Kim JH (5), Lee SG (7), Lim JY (1)
Affiliation: (1) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; (2) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea; (3) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea; (4) Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea; (5) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Rehabilitation Center, Seoul, Korea; (6) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Jinju, Korea; (7) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University College of Medical School, Gwangju, Korea
Journal: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: Ann Rehabil Med. 2014 Oct;38(5):637-47. doi: 10.5535/arm.2014.38.5.637
Publication Year and Month: 2014 10

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To obtain information on the socioeconomic, medical, and functional status of polio survivors, and to use these results as the preliminary data for establishing the middle-aged cohort of polio survivors.

METHODS: The subjects were recruited based on the medical records of multiple hospitals and centers. They were assessed through a structured questionnaire over the phone. Post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) was identified according to the specified diagnostic criteria. Differences between polio survivors with or without PPS were evaluated, and the risk factors for PPS were analyzed by the odds ratio (OR).

RESULTS: Majority of polio survivors were middle-aged and mean age was 51.2±8.3 years. A total of 188 out of 313 polio survivors met the adopted criteria for PPS based on the symptoms, yielding a prevalence of 61.6%. Mean interval between acute poliomyelitis and the development of PPS was 38.5±11.6 years. Female gender (OR 1.82; confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.06), the age at onset of poliomyelitis (OR 1.75; CI 1.05-2.94), the use of orthoses or walking aids (OR 2.46; CI 1.44-4.20), and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance (OR 2.62; CI 1.52-4.51) represented independent risk factors for PPS.

Conclusions: We found that the majority of Korean polio survivors entered middle age with many medical, functional, and social problems. Female gender, early age of onset of poliomyelitis, the use of orthoses or walking aids, and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance were identified as the significant risk factors for PPS. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary plan should be prepared to manage polio survivors considering their need for health care services and the risk factors for late effects, such as PPS.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Three case studies of late diagnoses of polio in Australian adults
Author: C.Formby, D.Currie
Affiliation: St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Polio Services Victoria, Fitzroy, Australia
Journal: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: Volume 61, Supplement, July 2018, Page e272
Publication Year and Month: 2018 07

Abstract: Introduction/Background
Polio Services Victoria (PSV) is a publicly funded organization; anyone with a history of polio residing in Australia may be seen by the service. The majority of patients referred to the service were diagnosed with polio shortly after they were infected with the virus, for most this was in early childhood and ranges from two to eight decades ago. In the past 18 months three patients were referred to PSV with untypically late diagnoses of polio, two of which were sisters. All were born in Australia between 1930 and 1950 and are considered to have acquired their infection in Australia during their early childhood. The three were able to live relatively uneventful lives however their verbal histories indicate suspicion of polio during their childhood medical examinations in school, but ultimately no formal diagnosis was made at that time. In later life, symptoms characteristic of the late effects of polio emerged. In combination with imaging and nerve conduction studies these symptoms were diagnosed as being the result of a likely childhood infection of polio. Their current and future management plans are typical of that seen regularly within the service with the patients reporting their main problems as being:

–pain;

–fatigue;

–increasing muscle atrophy and associated weakness.

These three cases highlight that although Australia, like most of the world, holds polio free status there may still be further undiagnosed cases. Polio should be considered as a differential diagnosis for patients presenting with any of the cardinal signs and symptoms of late effects of polio who have resided in a country during a time prior to polio eradication. Special consideration should be given where a sibling or close relative was diagnosed with polio.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Late functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis
Author: D. Kidd, R.S. Howard, A.J. Williams, F.W. Heatley, C.P. Panayiotopoulos and G.T. Spencer
Affiliation: Departments of Neurology, Respiratory Medicine and Orthopaedics, the Lane-Fox Unit, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK
Journal: Post-Polio Network (NSW) Inc
Citation: QJ Med 1997; 90: 189 - 196
Publication Year and Month: 1997 01

Abstract: Many patients with previous poliomyelitis develop 'post-polio syndrome' (PPS) in which late functional deterioration follows a period of relative stability. The frequency with which PPS can be attributed to clearly defined causes remains uncertain. We reviewed 283 newly-referred patients with previous poliomyelitis seen consecutively over a 4-year period; 239 patients developed symptoms of functional deterioration at a mean of 35 (5-65) years after the paralytic illness. Functional deterioration was associated with orthopaedic disorders in 170 cases, neurological disorders in 35, respiratory disorders in 19 and other disorders in 15. Progressive post-polio muscular atrophy was not observed. Functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis is common, and associated with orthopaedic, neurological, respiratory and general medical factors which are potentially treatable.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: New problems in old polio patients: results of a survey of 539 polio survivors
Author: Halstead LS, Rossi CD
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):845-50
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: Presented are the results of a questionnaire survey on new health problems in 539 polio survivors. The most common new problems were fatigue, weakness in previously affected and unaffected muscles, muscle pain, and joint pain. The median time from polio to the onset of these problems ranged from 30 to 40 years. Factors at onset of polio most strongly associated with developing these new health problems were: being hospitalized, being over 10 years old, being on a ventilator, and having paralytic involvement of all four limbs. The differential diagnoses of these new problems, implications for treatment and areas for future research are discussed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available):


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: People living with post-polio syndrome must not be forgotten
Author: Hill T
Affiliation: British Polio Fellowship
Journal: Nursing Standard
Citation: Nurs Stand. 2015 Nov 4;30(10):30-1. doi: 10.7748/ns.30.10.30.s38
Publication Year and Month: 2015 11

Abstract: As research conducted by YouGov reveals, only 7% of people in Britain are aware of the neurological condition post-polio syndrome (PPS). The British Polio Fellowship is keen to highlight what is now an urgent need for more support for those living with PPS, from both the public and the nursing and medical community.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Assistive Technology, Late Effects of Polio

Title: Coping with a Second Disability: Implications of the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Occupational Therapists
Author: Mary Westbrook, Lynette McDowell
Affiliation: Macquarie University, Sydney. Australia
Journal: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
Citation: 38(2):83 - 91
Publication Year and Month: 2010 08

Abstract: The long term effects of many physical disabilities have only recently begun to be appreciated. For people who have lived for years with what they thought to be stable conditions, the onset of secondary disabilities may be associated with considerable problems and distress. A questionnaire survey of 324 people with poliomyelitis revealed the occurrence of late effects in 94% of respondents. The majority reported increased weakness, pain and fatigue, problems in carrying out daily living activities and difficulties in obtaining appropriate health care. Although occupational therapists were less likely to be consulted than other professionals, they received one of the highest satisfaction ratings from clients.

Conclusions: Discussion of case studies indicates ways in which occupational therapists can provide symptom relief and enable clients to maintain valued roles. As the survival rates of people with disabilities increase there is a need for greater awareness of, and research into, the late effects of disability.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Experiences and perspectives of patients with post-polio syndrome and therapists with exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy
Author: Minne Bakker, Karen Schipper, Fieke S. Koopman, Frans Nollet and Tineke A. Abma
Affiliation: Department of Medical Humanities, EMGO+ Institute, VU Medical Center
(VUmc), Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Journal: BioMed Central Neurology
Citation: BMC Neurology (2016) 16:23
Publication Year and Month: 2016

Abstract: Background: Many persons affected with poliomyelitis develop post-polio syndrome (PPS) later in their life.
Recently, the effectiveness of Exercise Therapy (ET) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for PPS has been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial, but did not show a decrease in fatigue or improvement in secondary endpoints like Quality of Life and self-perceived activity limitations. The aim of this explorative study was to gain insight in the perceived effects and experiences of the interventions from the perspectives of the patients and
therapists.
Methods: Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 17 patients and 7 therapists. All participants were involved in the trial. A thematic analysis of the data was performed.
Results: Some patients experienced a short term enhanced endurance and a better use of energy during the day. However, in general patients did not experience a long lasting reduction of fatigue from the CBT or ET. Mainly patients of the CBT, but also some patients of the ET described an increase of self-esteem and self-acceptance. As a result, patients were sometimes better able to perform physical activities during the day. In contrast to the CBT, the
ET was in general perceived by the patients as an intensive therapy, which was difficult to fit into their daily routine. Therapists of both the CBT and the ET struggled with a low intrinsic motivation of the patients in the study.
This made it sometimes difficult for the therapists to follow the protocol.

Conclusions: Conclusion: Confirming the negative quantitative study outcome, the qualitative results did not demonstrate lasting effects on fatigue. Patients did, however, experience some benefits on self-esteem and acceptance of the disease. This study showed that it is of great importance to work with feasible interventions; they should fit the patients’ needs on a practical (fit into their daily routine) and mental (fit their need for support) level.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Prevalence and risk factors of post-polio syndrome in a cohort of polio survivors.
Author: Paolo Ragonese, Brigida Fierro, Giuseppe Salemi, Giovanna Randisi, Daniela Buffa, Marco D'Amelio, Antonella Aloisio, Giovanni Savettieri
Affiliation: Dipartimento di Neurologia, Oftalmologia, Otorinolaringoiatria e Psichiatria, Università di Palermo, Italy.
Journal: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Citation: 2005 Sep 15;236(1-2):31-5.
Publication Year and Month: 2005 09

Abstract: OBJECTIVE:
To investigate frequency and associated factors of post polio syndrome (PPS) in an Italian cohort of people with prior poliomyelitis.

METHODS:
We screened subjects admitted for poliomyelitis at the paediatric hospital of the University of Palermo during the time frame 1945-1960. Patients who developed PPS were identified through a structured questionnaire and a neurologic examination. PPS diagnosis was made according to specified diagnostic criteria. Frequency of PPS was calculated in the selected cohort of polio survivors. The association with the investigated risk factors (sex, age at onset of polio, extension and severity of polio, education, associated diseases, cigarette smoking, trauma, polio vaccination) was analysed by the calculation of the odds ratio.

RESULTS:
Forty-eight participants met the adopted diagnostic criteria for PPS, giving a prevalence of 31.0%. The prevalence rate was significantly higher in women than in men (p=0.02). Logistic regression analyses revealed a significant inverse association with onset of poliomyelitis at over 12 months of age (OR 0.33; CI 0.14-0.79) a higher degree of education (OR 0.20; CI 0.07-0.79), and a significant association with the presence of other diseases (OR 9.86; CI 3.69-26.34).

Conclusions: CONCLUSIONS:
In our survey one-third of patients with prior poliomyelitis had PPS. Higher age at onset of poliomyelitis is inversely associated with PPS. The association with other diseases may indicate that a chronic physical stress, particularly in already weak motor units, can contribute to the development of signs and symptoms of PPS. Our results also suggest the impact of socio-economic conditions on the risk of PPS.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Polio: long-term problems
Author: Perry J, Fleming C
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):877-81
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: The most common long-term problems seen in polio are brace problems, knee recurvatum, increasing weakness due to overuse and ankle equinus. A definite increased incidence of problems is seen after the patient is more than 30 years post-polio. The basis for most of these problems is chronic mechanical strain of weak musculature and substituting ligaments. Overuse can cause increasing weakness resulting in pain and decreasing function. It is therefore important to follow polio patients closely, especially those that are more than 30 years post-polio. If signs of overuse or chronic mechanical strain are noted, treatment should not be delayed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Risk of symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis
Author: Rekand T, Albrektsen G, Langeland N, Aarli JA
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Haukeland Hospital, Bergen, Norway
Journal: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Citation: Acta Neurol Scand. 2000 Mar;101(3):153-8
Publication Year and Month: 2000 03

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of developing symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis between polio patients and persons of similar age and sex without history of poliomyelitis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised information on 148 patients with prior poliomyelitis and 115 persons with no history of poliomyelitis. Information was obtained by questionnaire and analyzed by multiple logistic regression method.

RESULTS: The risk of experiencing two or more symptoms was significantly higher among the polio patients than among the persons without history of poliomyelitis. The elevation in risk was less pronounced in the nonparalytic group (OR = 2.35; 95% CI = 0.92-5.97) than the group with permanent muscular weakness (OR = 8.84; 95% CI =4.32-18.09).

Conclusions: Although symptoms defined in the PPS are unspecific and may occur in the general population, the risk for developing such symptoms are higher among the polio victims. The difference in risk among nonparalytic and paralytic patients may depend on the extent of motor neuron damage in the acute stage.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Psoriasis sparing the lower limb with postpoliomyelitis residual paralysis
Author: Wang TS (1), Tsai TF
Affiliation: (1) Department of Dermatology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
Journal: British Journal of Dermatology
Citation: Br J Dermatol. 2014 Aug;171(2):429-31. doi: 10.1111/bjd.12854
Publication Year and Month: 2014 08

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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There are currently 12 papers in this category.

Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Risk of symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis
Author: Rekand T, Albrektsen G, Langeland N, Aarli JA
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Haukeland Hospital, Bergen, Norway
Journal: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Citation: Acta Neurol Scand. 2000 Mar;101(3):153-8
Publication Year and Month: 2000 03

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of developing symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis between polio patients and persons of similar age and sex without history of poliomyelitis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised information on 148 patients with prior poliomyelitis and 115 persons with no history of poliomyelitis. Information was obtained by questionnaire and analyzed by multiple logistic regression method.

RESULTS: The risk of experiencing two or more symptoms was significantly higher among the polio patients than among the persons without history of poliomyelitis. The elevation in risk was less pronounced in the nonparalytic group (OR = 2.35; 95% CI = 0.92-5.97) than the group with permanent muscular weakness (OR = 8.84; 95% CI =4.32-18.09).

Conclusions: Although symptoms defined in the PPS are unspecific and may occur in the general population, the risk for developing such symptoms are higher among the polio victims. The difference in risk among nonparalytic and paralytic patients may depend on the extent of motor neuron damage in the acute stage.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Three case studies of late diagnoses of polio in Australian adults
Author: C.Formby, D.Currie
Affiliation: St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Polio Services Victoria, Fitzroy, Australia
Journal: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: Volume 61, Supplement, July 2018, Page e272
Publication Year and Month: 2018 07

Abstract: Introduction/Background
Polio Services Victoria (PSV) is a publicly funded organization; anyone with a history of polio residing in Australia may be seen by the service. The majority of patients referred to the service were diagnosed with polio shortly after they were infected with the virus, for most this was in early childhood and ranges from two to eight decades ago. In the past 18 months three patients were referred to PSV with untypically late diagnoses of polio, two of which were sisters. All were born in Australia between 1930 and 1950 and are considered to have acquired their infection in Australia during their early childhood. The three were able to live relatively uneventful lives however their verbal histories indicate suspicion of polio during their childhood medical examinations in school, but ultimately no formal diagnosis was made at that time. In later life, symptoms characteristic of the late effects of polio emerged. In combination with imaging and nerve conduction studies these symptoms were diagnosed as being the result of a likely childhood infection of polio. Their current and future management plans are typical of that seen regularly within the service with the patients reporting their main problems as being:

–pain;

–fatigue;

–increasing muscle atrophy and associated weakness.

These three cases highlight that although Australia, like most of the world, holds polio free status there may still be further undiagnosed cases. Polio should be considered as a differential diagnosis for patients presenting with any of the cardinal signs and symptoms of late effects of polio who have resided in a country during a time prior to polio eradication. Special consideration should be given where a sibling or close relative was diagnosed with polio.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Post-polio syndrome and risk factors in Korean polio survivors: a baseline survey by telephone interview
Author: Bang H (1), Suh JH (2), Lee SY (3), Kim K (1), Yang EJ (1), Jung SH (1), Jang SN (4), Han SJ (2), Kim WH (5), Oh MG (6), Kim JH (5), Lee SG (7), Lim JY (1)
Affiliation: (1) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; (2) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea; (3) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea; (4) Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea; (5) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Rehabilitation Center, Seoul, Korea; (6) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Jinju, Korea; (7) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University College of Medical School, Gwangju, Korea
Journal: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: Ann Rehabil Med. 2014 Oct;38(5):637-47. doi: 10.5535/arm.2014.38.5.637
Publication Year and Month: 2014 10

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To obtain information on the socioeconomic, medical, and functional status of polio survivors, and to use these results as the preliminary data for establishing the middle-aged cohort of polio survivors.

METHODS: The subjects were recruited based on the medical records of multiple hospitals and centers. They were assessed through a structured questionnaire over the phone. Post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) was identified according to the specified diagnostic criteria. Differences between polio survivors with or without PPS were evaluated, and the risk factors for PPS were analyzed by the odds ratio (OR).

RESULTS: Majority of polio survivors were middle-aged and mean age was 51.2±8.3 years. A total of 188 out of 313 polio survivors met the adopted criteria for PPS based on the symptoms, yielding a prevalence of 61.6%. Mean interval between acute poliomyelitis and the development of PPS was 38.5±11.6 years. Female gender (OR 1.82; confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.06), the age at onset of poliomyelitis (OR 1.75; CI 1.05-2.94), the use of orthoses or walking aids (OR 2.46; CI 1.44-4.20), and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance (OR 2.62; CI 1.52-4.51) represented independent risk factors for PPS.

Conclusions: We found that the majority of Korean polio survivors entered middle age with many medical, functional, and social problems. Female gender, early age of onset of poliomyelitis, the use of orthoses or walking aids, and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance were identified as the significant risk factors for PPS. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary plan should be prepared to manage polio survivors considering their need for health care services and the risk factors for late effects, such as PPS.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

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Category: Assistive Technology, Late Effects of Polio

Title: Coping with a Second Disability: Implications of the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Occupational Therapists
Author: Mary Westbrook, Lynette McDowell
Affiliation: Macquarie University, Sydney. Australia
Journal: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
Citation: 38(2):83 - 91
Publication Year and Month: 2010 08

Abstract: The long term effects of many physical disabilities have only recently begun to be appreciated. For people who have lived for years with what they thought to be stable conditions, the onset of secondary disabilities may be associated with considerable problems and distress. A questionnaire survey of 324 people with poliomyelitis revealed the occurrence of late effects in 94% of respondents. The majority reported increased weakness, pain and fatigue, problems in carrying out daily living activities and difficulties in obtaining appropriate health care. Although occupational therapists were less likely to be consulted than other professionals, they received one of the highest satisfaction ratings from clients.

Conclusions: Discussion of case studies indicates ways in which occupational therapists can provide symptom relief and enable clients to maintain valued roles. As the survival rates of people with disabilities increase there is a need for greater awareness of, and research into, the late effects of disability.

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Experiences and perspectives of patients with post-polio syndrome and therapists with exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy
Author: Minne Bakker, Karen Schipper, Fieke S. Koopman, Frans Nollet and Tineke A. Abma
Affiliation: Department of Medical Humanities, EMGO+ Institute, VU Medical Center
(VUmc), Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Journal: BioMed Central Neurology
Citation: BMC Neurology (2016) 16:23
Publication Year and Month: 2016

Abstract: Background: Many persons affected with poliomyelitis develop post-polio syndrome (PPS) later in their life.
Recently, the effectiveness of Exercise Therapy (ET) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for PPS has been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial, but did not show a decrease in fatigue or improvement in secondary endpoints like Quality of Life and self-perceived activity limitations. The aim of this explorative study was to gain insight in the perceived effects and experiences of the interventions from the perspectives of the patients and
therapists.
Methods: Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 17 patients and 7 therapists. All participants were involved in the trial. A thematic analysis of the data was performed.
Results: Some patients experienced a short term enhanced endurance and a better use of energy during the day. However, in general patients did not experience a long lasting reduction of fatigue from the CBT or ET. Mainly patients of the CBT, but also some patients of the ET described an increase of self-esteem and self-acceptance. As a result, patients were sometimes better able to perform physical activities during the day. In contrast to the CBT, the
ET was in general perceived by the patients as an intensive therapy, which was difficult to fit into their daily routine. Therapists of both the CBT and the ET struggled with a low intrinsic motivation of the patients in the study.
This made it sometimes difficult for the therapists to follow the protocol.

Conclusions: Conclusion: Confirming the negative quantitative study outcome, the qualitative results did not demonstrate lasting effects on fatigue. Patients did, however, experience some benefits on self-esteem and acceptance of the disease. This study showed that it is of great importance to work with feasible interventions; they should fit the patients’ needs on a practical (fit into their daily routine) and mental (fit their need for support) level.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Psoriasis sparing the lower limb with postpoliomyelitis residual paralysis
Author: Wang TS (1), Tsai TF
Affiliation: (1) Department of Dermatology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
Journal: British Journal of Dermatology
Citation: Br J Dermatol. 2014 Aug;171(2):429-31. doi: 10.1111/bjd.12854
Publication Year and Month: 2014 08

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Prevalence and risk factors of post-polio syndrome in a cohort of polio survivors.
Author: Paolo Ragonese, Brigida Fierro, Giuseppe Salemi, Giovanna Randisi, Daniela Buffa, Marco D'Amelio, Antonella Aloisio, Giovanni Savettieri
Affiliation: Dipartimento di Neurologia, Oftalmologia, Otorinolaringoiatria e Psichiatria, Università di Palermo, Italy.
Journal: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Citation: 2005 Sep 15;236(1-2):31-5.
Publication Year and Month: 2005 09

Abstract: OBJECTIVE:
To investigate frequency and associated factors of post polio syndrome (PPS) in an Italian cohort of people with prior poliomyelitis.

METHODS:
We screened subjects admitted for poliomyelitis at the paediatric hospital of the University of Palermo during the time frame 1945-1960. Patients who developed PPS were identified through a structured questionnaire and a neurologic examination. PPS diagnosis was made according to specified diagnostic criteria. Frequency of PPS was calculated in the selected cohort of polio survivors. The association with the investigated risk factors (sex, age at onset of polio, extension and severity of polio, education, associated diseases, cigarette smoking, trauma, polio vaccination) was analysed by the calculation of the odds ratio.

RESULTS:
Forty-eight participants met the adopted diagnostic criteria for PPS, giving a prevalence of 31.0%. The prevalence rate was significantly higher in women than in men (p=0.02). Logistic regression analyses revealed a significant inverse association with onset of poliomyelitis at over 12 months of age (OR 0.33; CI 0.14-0.79) a higher degree of education (OR 0.20; CI 0.07-0.79), and a significant association with the presence of other diseases (OR 9.86; CI 3.69-26.34).

Conclusions: CONCLUSIONS:
In our survey one-third of patients with prior poliomyelitis had PPS. Higher age at onset of poliomyelitis is inversely associated with PPS. The association with other diseases may indicate that a chronic physical stress, particularly in already weak motor units, can contribute to the development of signs and symptoms of PPS. Our results also suggest the impact of socio-economic conditions on the risk of PPS.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: People living with post-polio syndrome must not be forgotten
Author: Hill T
Affiliation: British Polio Fellowship
Journal: Nursing Standard
Citation: Nurs Stand. 2015 Nov 4;30(10):30-1. doi: 10.7748/ns.30.10.30.s38
Publication Year and Month: 2015 11

Abstract: As research conducted by YouGov reveals, only 7% of people in Britain are aware of the neurological condition post-polio syndrome (PPS). The British Polio Fellowship is keen to highlight what is now an urgent need for more support for those living with PPS, from both the public and the nursing and medical community.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: New problems in old polio patients: results of a survey of 539 polio survivors
Author: Halstead LS, Rossi CD
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):845-50
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: Presented are the results of a questionnaire survey on new health problems in 539 polio survivors. The most common new problems were fatigue, weakness in previously affected and unaffected muscles, muscle pain, and joint pain. The median time from polio to the onset of these problems ranged from 30 to 40 years. Factors at onset of polio most strongly associated with developing these new health problems were: being hospitalized, being over 10 years old, being on a ventilator, and having paralytic involvement of all four limbs. The differential diagnoses of these new problems, implications for treatment and areas for future research are discussed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Polio: long-term problems
Author: Perry J, Fleming C
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):877-81
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: The most common long-term problems seen in polio are brace problems, knee recurvatum, increasing weakness due to overuse and ankle equinus. A definite increased incidence of problems is seen after the patient is more than 30 years post-polio. The basis for most of these problems is chronic mechanical strain of weak musculature and substituting ligaments. Overuse can cause increasing weakness resulting in pain and decreasing function. It is therefore important to follow polio patients closely, especially those that are more than 30 years post-polio. If signs of overuse or chronic mechanical strain are noted, treatment should not be delayed.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research:

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Late functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis
Author: D. Kidd, R.S. Howard, A.J. Williams, F.W. Heatley, C.P. Panayiotopoulos and G.T. Spencer
Affiliation: Departments of Neurology, Respiratory Medicine and Orthopaedics, the Lane-Fox Unit, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK
Journal: Post-Polio Network (NSW) Inc
Citation: QJ Med 1997; 90: 189 - 196
Publication Year and Month: 1997 01

Abstract: Many patients with previous poliomyelitis develop 'post-polio syndrome' (PPS) in which late functional deterioration follows a period of relative stability. The frequency with which PPS can be attributed to clearly defined causes remains uncertain. We reviewed 283 newly-referred patients with previous poliomyelitis seen consecutively over a 4-year period; 239 patients developed symptoms of functional deterioration at a mean of 35 (5-65) years after the paralytic illness. Functional deterioration was associated with orthopaedic disorders in 170 cases, neurological disorders in 35, respiratory disorders in 19 and other disorders in 15. Progressive post-polio muscular atrophy was not observed. Functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis is common, and associated with orthopaedic, neurological, respiratory and general medical factors which are potentially treatable.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Living with polio and postpolio syndrome in the United Kingdom
Author: Atwal A (1), Giles A, Spiliotopoulou G, Plastow N, Wilson L
Affiliation: (1) School of Health Science and Social Care, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge, Middlesex, London, UK - [email protected]

Journal: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Citation: Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Jun;27(2):238-45. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01029.x
Publication Year and Month: 2013 06

Abstract: The term Postpolio Syndrome (PPS) is used to describe new and late manifestations of poliomyelitis that occur later in life in polio survivors. Polio had been eradicated in the United Kingdom (UK) and most of Europe, although this is not the case in all countries. Research in this area has tended to focus upon the impact of polio and PPS on health status and functional health rather than its overall effect on people's lives. This study's two main aims were to explore the ways in which polio and PPS in the UK has affected the respondents' lives and to ascertain their views about how the quality of life could be improved. The two questions were as follows: (1) How has the health of people with polio and PPS affected their quality of life? (2) What would people with polio and PPS change to improve their quality of life? Deductive content analysis using existing qualitative data from a cross-sectional survey of 336 returned questionnaires from persons with polio and PPS was carried out. The average age of the participants was 54 years. Our research found that polio survivors valued social occupations and participation in family life. Our research has also shown that healthcare professionals still do not understand polio and PPS and this lack of understanding influences their clients' quality of life. Finances and accessibility of environments also influence participation in chosen occupations. Rehabilitation programmes for people with polio and PPS need to be targeted towards maintaining and improving accessible environments and participation in chosen occupations, and healthcare professionals need to ensure that persons with polio and PPS are referred to persons with specific expertise in this area.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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There are currently 12 papers in this category.

Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Three case studies of late diagnoses of polio in Australian adults
Author: C.Formby, D.Currie
Affiliation: St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Polio Services Victoria, Fitzroy, Australia
Journal: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: Volume 61, Supplement, July 2018, Page e272
Publication Year and Month: 2018 07

Abstract: Introduction/Background
Polio Services Victoria (PSV) is a publicly funded organization; anyone with a history of polio residing in Australia may be seen by the service. The majority of patients referred to the service were diagnosed with polio shortly after they were infected with the virus, for most this was in early childhood and ranges from two to eight decades ago. In the past 18 months three patients were referred to PSV with untypically late diagnoses of polio, two of which were sisters. All were born in Australia between 1930 and 1950 and are considered to have acquired their infection in Australia during their early childhood. The three were able to live relatively uneventful lives however their verbal histories indicate suspicion of polio during their childhood medical examinations in school, but ultimately no formal diagnosis was made at that time. In later life, symptoms characteristic of the late effects of polio emerged. In combination with imaging and nerve conduction studies these symptoms were diagnosed as being the result of a likely childhood infection of polio. Their current and future management plans are typical of that seen regularly within the service with the patients reporting their main problems as being:

–pain;

–fatigue;

–increasing muscle atrophy and associated weakness.

These three cases highlight that although Australia, like most of the world, holds polio free status there may still be further undiagnosed cases. Polio should be considered as a differential diagnosis for patients presenting with any of the cardinal signs and symptoms of late effects of polio who have resided in a country during a time prior to polio eradication. Special consideration should be given where a sibling or close relative was diagnosed with polio.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here for preview


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Experiences and perspectives of patients with post-polio syndrome and therapists with exercise and cognitive behavioural therapy
Author: Minne Bakker, Karen Schipper, Fieke S. Koopman, Frans Nollet and Tineke A. Abma
Affiliation: Department of Medical Humanities, EMGO+ Institute, VU Medical Center
(VUmc), Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Journal: BioMed Central Neurology
Citation: BMC Neurology (2016) 16:23
Publication Year and Month: 2016

Abstract: Background: Many persons affected with poliomyelitis develop post-polio syndrome (PPS) later in their life.
Recently, the effectiveness of Exercise Therapy (ET) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for PPS has been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial, but did not show a decrease in fatigue or improvement in secondary endpoints like Quality of Life and self-perceived activity limitations. The aim of this explorative study was to gain insight in the perceived effects and experiences of the interventions from the perspectives of the patients and
therapists.
Methods: Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 17 patients and 7 therapists. All participants were involved in the trial. A thematic analysis of the data was performed.
Results: Some patients experienced a short term enhanced endurance and a better use of energy during the day. However, in general patients did not experience a long lasting reduction of fatigue from the CBT or ET. Mainly patients of the CBT, but also some patients of the ET described an increase of self-esteem and self-acceptance. As a result, patients were sometimes better able to perform physical activities during the day. In contrast to the CBT, the
ET was in general perceived by the patients as an intensive therapy, which was difficult to fit into their daily routine. Therapists of both the CBT and the ET struggled with a low intrinsic motivation of the patients in the study.
This made it sometimes difficult for the therapists to follow the protocol.

Conclusions: Conclusion: Confirming the negative quantitative study outcome, the qualitative results did not demonstrate lasting effects on fatigue. Patients did, however, experience some benefits on self-esteem and acceptance of the disease. This study showed that it is of great importance to work with feasible interventions; they should fit the patients’ needs on a practical (fit into their daily routine) and mental (fit their need for support) level.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper:

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: People living with post-polio syndrome must not be forgotten
Author: Hill T
Affiliation: British Polio Fellowship
Journal: Nursing Standard
Citation: Nurs Stand. 2015 Nov 4;30(10):30-1. doi: 10.7748/ns.30.10.30.s38
Publication Year and Month: 2015 11

Abstract: As research conducted by YouGov reveals, only 7% of people in Britain are aware of the neurological condition post-polio syndrome (PPS). The British Polio Fellowship is keen to highlight what is now an urgent need for more support for those living with PPS, from both the public and the nursing and medical community.

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Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Post-polio syndrome and risk factors in Korean polio survivors: a baseline survey by telephone interview
Author: Bang H (1), Suh JH (2), Lee SY (3), Kim K (1), Yang EJ (1), Jung SH (1), Jang SN (4), Han SJ (2), Kim WH (5), Oh MG (6), Kim JH (5), Lee SG (7), Lim JY (1)
Affiliation: (1) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; (2) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea; (3) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Korea; (4) Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea; (5) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, National Rehabilitation Center, Seoul, Korea; (6) Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Jinju, Korea; (7) Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Chonnam National University College of Medical School, Gwangju, Korea
Journal: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Citation: Ann Rehabil Med. 2014 Oct;38(5):637-47. doi: 10.5535/arm.2014.38.5.637
Publication Year and Month: 2014 10

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To obtain information on the socioeconomic, medical, and functional status of polio survivors, and to use these results as the preliminary data for establishing the middle-aged cohort of polio survivors.

METHODS: The subjects were recruited based on the medical records of multiple hospitals and centers. They were assessed through a structured questionnaire over the phone. Post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) was identified according to the specified diagnostic criteria. Differences between polio survivors with or without PPS were evaluated, and the risk factors for PPS were analyzed by the odds ratio (OR).

RESULTS: Majority of polio survivors were middle-aged and mean age was 51.2±8.3 years. A total of 188 out of 313 polio survivors met the adopted criteria for PPS based on the symptoms, yielding a prevalence of 61.6%. Mean interval between acute poliomyelitis and the development of PPS was 38.5±11.6 years. Female gender (OR 1.82; confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.06), the age at onset of poliomyelitis (OR 1.75; CI 1.05-2.94), the use of orthoses or walking aids (OR 2.46; CI 1.44-4.20), and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance (OR 2.62; CI 1.52-4.51) represented independent risk factors for PPS.

Conclusions: We found that the majority of Korean polio survivors entered middle age with many medical, functional, and social problems. Female gender, early age of onset of poliomyelitis, the use of orthoses or walking aids, and the history of medical treatment for paralysis, pain or gait disturbance were identified as the significant risk factors for PPS. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary plan should be prepared to manage polio survivors considering their need for health care services and the risk factors for late effects, such as PPS.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Psoriasis sparing the lower limb with postpoliomyelitis residual paralysis
Author: Wang TS (1), Tsai TF
Affiliation: (1) Department of Dermatology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan
Journal: British Journal of Dermatology
Citation: Br J Dermatol. 2014 Aug;171(2):429-31. doi: 10.1111/bjd.12854
Publication Year and Month: 2014 08

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract.

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Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Living with polio and postpolio syndrome in the United Kingdom
Author: Atwal A (1), Giles A, Spiliotopoulou G, Plastow N, Wilson L
Affiliation: (1) School of Health Science and Social Care, Brunel University, Kingston Lane, Uxbridge, Middlesex, London, UK - [email protected]

Journal: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Citation: Scand J Caring Sci. 2013 Jun;27(2):238-45. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2012.01029.x
Publication Year and Month: 2013 06

Abstract: The term Postpolio Syndrome (PPS) is used to describe new and late manifestations of poliomyelitis that occur later in life in polio survivors. Polio had been eradicated in the United Kingdom (UK) and most of Europe, although this is not the case in all countries. Research in this area has tended to focus upon the impact of polio and PPS on health status and functional health rather than its overall effect on people's lives. This study's two main aims were to explore the ways in which polio and PPS in the UK has affected the respondents' lives and to ascertain their views about how the quality of life could be improved. The two questions were as follows: (1) How has the health of people with polio and PPS affected their quality of life? (2) What would people with polio and PPS change to improve their quality of life? Deductive content analysis using existing qualitative data from a cross-sectional survey of 336 returned questionnaires from persons with polio and PPS was carried out. The average age of the participants was 54 years. Our research found that polio survivors valued social occupations and participation in family life. Our research has also shown that healthcare professionals still do not understand polio and PPS and this lack of understanding influences their clients' quality of life. Finances and accessibility of environments also influence participation in chosen occupations. Rehabilitation programmes for people with polio and PPS need to be targeted towards maintaining and improving accessible environments and participation in chosen occupations, and healthcare professionals need to ensure that persons with polio and PPS are referred to persons with specific expertise in this area.

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Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Assistive Technology, Late Effects of Polio

Title: Coping with a Second Disability: Implications of the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Occupational Therapists
Author: Mary Westbrook, Lynette McDowell
Affiliation: Macquarie University, Sydney. Australia
Journal: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
Citation: 38(2):83 - 91
Publication Year and Month: 2010 08

Abstract: The long term effects of many physical disabilities have only recently begun to be appreciated. For people who have lived for years with what they thought to be stable conditions, the onset of secondary disabilities may be associated with considerable problems and distress. A questionnaire survey of 324 people with poliomyelitis revealed the occurrence of late effects in 94% of respondents. The majority reported increased weakness, pain and fatigue, problems in carrying out daily living activities and difficulties in obtaining appropriate health care. Although occupational therapists were less likely to be consulted than other professionals, they received one of the highest satisfaction ratings from clients.

Conclusions: Discussion of case studies indicates ways in which occupational therapists can provide symptom relief and enable clients to maintain valued roles. As the survival rates of people with disabilities increase there is a need for greater awareness of, and research into, the late effects of disability.

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Prevalence and risk factors of post-polio syndrome in a cohort of polio survivors.
Author: Paolo Ragonese, Brigida Fierro, Giuseppe Salemi, Giovanna Randisi, Daniela Buffa, Marco D'Amelio, Antonella Aloisio, Giovanni Savettieri
Affiliation: Dipartimento di Neurologia, Oftalmologia, Otorinolaringoiatria e Psichiatria, Università di Palermo, Italy.
Journal: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Citation: 2005 Sep 15;236(1-2):31-5.
Publication Year and Month: 2005 09

Abstract: OBJECTIVE:
To investigate frequency and associated factors of post polio syndrome (PPS) in an Italian cohort of people with prior poliomyelitis.

METHODS:
We screened subjects admitted for poliomyelitis at the paediatric hospital of the University of Palermo during the time frame 1945-1960. Patients who developed PPS were identified through a structured questionnaire and a neurologic examination. PPS diagnosis was made according to specified diagnostic criteria. Frequency of PPS was calculated in the selected cohort of polio survivors. The association with the investigated risk factors (sex, age at onset of polio, extension and severity of polio, education, associated diseases, cigarette smoking, trauma, polio vaccination) was analysed by the calculation of the odds ratio.

RESULTS:
Forty-eight participants met the adopted diagnostic criteria for PPS, giving a prevalence of 31.0%. The prevalence rate was significantly higher in women than in men (p=0.02). Logistic regression analyses revealed a significant inverse association with onset of poliomyelitis at over 12 months of age (OR 0.33; CI 0.14-0.79) a higher degree of education (OR 0.20; CI 0.07-0.79), and a significant association with the presence of other diseases (OR 9.86; CI 3.69-26.34).

Conclusions: CONCLUSIONS:
In our survey one-third of patients with prior poliomyelitis had PPS. Higher age at onset of poliomyelitis is inversely associated with PPS. The association with other diseases may indicate that a chronic physical stress, particularly in already weak motor units, can contribute to the development of signs and symptoms of PPS. Our results also suggest the impact of socio-economic conditions on the risk of PPS.

Outcome of Research: More research required

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Risk of symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis
Author: Rekand T, Albrektsen G, Langeland N, Aarli JA
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Haukeland Hospital, Bergen, Norway
Journal: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Citation: Acta Neurol Scand. 2000 Mar;101(3):153-8
Publication Year and Month: 2000 03

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of developing symptoms related to late effects of poliomyelitis between polio patients and persons of similar age and sex without history of poliomyelitis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study comprised information on 148 patients with prior poliomyelitis and 115 persons with no history of poliomyelitis. Information was obtained by questionnaire and analyzed by multiple logistic regression method.

RESULTS: The risk of experiencing two or more symptoms was significantly higher among the polio patients than among the persons without history of poliomyelitis. The elevation in risk was less pronounced in the nonparalytic group (OR = 2.35; 95% CI = 0.92-5.97) than the group with permanent muscular weakness (OR = 8.84; 95% CI =4.32-18.09).

Conclusions: Although symptoms defined in the PPS are unspecific and may occur in the general population, the risk for developing such symptoms are higher among the polio victims. The difference in risk among nonparalytic and paralytic patients may depend on the extent of motor neuron damage in the acute stage.

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Late functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis
Author: D. Kidd, R.S. Howard, A.J. Williams, F.W. Heatley, C.P. Panayiotopoulos and G.T. Spencer
Affiliation: Departments of Neurology, Respiratory Medicine and Orthopaedics, the Lane-Fox Unit, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK
Journal: Post-Polio Network (NSW) Inc
Citation: QJ Med 1997; 90: 189 - 196
Publication Year and Month: 1997 01

Abstract: Many patients with previous poliomyelitis develop 'post-polio syndrome' (PPS) in which late functional deterioration follows a period of relative stability. The frequency with which PPS can be attributed to clearly defined causes remains uncertain. We reviewed 283 newly-referred patients with previous poliomyelitis seen consecutively over a 4-year period; 239 patients developed symptoms of functional deterioration at a mean of 35 (5-65) years after the paralytic illness. Functional deterioration was associated with orthopaedic disorders in 170 cases, neurological disorders in 35, respiratory disorders in 19 and other disorders in 15. Progressive post-polio muscular atrophy was not observed. Functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis is common, and associated with orthopaedic, neurological, respiratory and general medical factors which are potentially treatable.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: Not applicable

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: New problems in old polio patients: results of a survey of 539 polio survivors
Author: Halstead LS, Rossi CD
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):845-50
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: Presented are the results of a questionnaire survey on new health problems in 539 polio survivors. The most common new problems were fatigue, weakness in previously affected and unaffected muscles, muscle pain, and joint pain. The median time from polio to the onset of these problems ranged from 30 to 40 years. Factors at onset of polio most strongly associated with developing these new health problems were: being hospitalized, being over 10 years old, being on a ventilator, and having paralytic involvement of all four limbs. The differential diagnoses of these new problems, implications for treatment and areas for future research are discussed.

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Category: Late Effects of Polio

Title: Polio: long-term problems
Author: Perry J, Fleming C
Affiliation: Not stated
Journal: Orthopedics
Citation: Orthopedics. 1985 Jul; 8(7):877-81
Publication Year and Month: 1985 07

Abstract: The most common long-term problems seen in polio are brace problems, knee recurvatum, increasing weakness due to overuse and ankle equinus. A definite increased incidence of problems is seen after the patient is more than 30 years post-polio. The basis for most of these problems is chronic mechanical strain of weak musculature and substituting ligaments. Overuse can cause increasing weakness resulting in pain and decreasing function. It is therefore important to follow polio patients closely, especially those that are more than 30 years post-polio. If signs of overuse or chronic mechanical strain are noted, treatment should not be delayed.

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There are currently 12 papers in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications