Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Coping Styles and Strategies

Title: Aging With Long-Term Mobility Impairment: Maintaining Activities of Daily Living via Selection, Optimization, and Compensation
Author: Remillard, E.T., Bailey Fausset, C., Fain, W.B.
Affiliation: Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30318
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: The Gerontologist, gnx186, https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnx186
Publication Year and Month: 2017 11

Abstract: There is a growing number of adults with long-term mobility impairment aging into the older adult population. Little is known about the experiences of these individuals in maintaining activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) as they face age-related changes in addition to a pre-existing mobility impairment.

Research Design and Methods
Through in-home interviews with 21 participants (ages 52–86) with long-term mobility impairment, the present study employed a qualitative description design to explore perceptions of how and why select ADL/IADL routines (e.g., bed transfer, toileting) have changed over time. The selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC) model was used as a framework to organize participants’ adaptations.

Results
Among the ADL/IADL routine changes mentioned, elective selection strategies, in which a person continues to work at maintaining a task, were more frequently endorsed than loss-based selection strategies, in which a person does a task less or gets help from someone. Findings suggest that this population is actively adapting their routines to preserve their involvement in, and frequency of doing, these ADLs/IADLs. Counter to expectation, perceived age-related changes underlying activity routine changes were subtle and generally did not include sensory and cognitive declines.

Discussion and Implications
Findings provide insights into the difficulties adults with long-term mobility impairment experience as they age, as well as the adaptations they employ to overcome those challenges. Results highlight the need for customizable, mobility supports (e.g., assistive technologies, home modifications) that can adjust to an individual’s changing abilities across the life span.

Conclusions: Despite challenges, this population is actively adapting their routines to maintain ADLs/IADLs and preserve their involvement in, and frequency of doing, these activities. For older adults with long-term mobility impairment, age-related changes underlying ADL/IADL routine changes are often subtle and can be difficult for individuals to identify and articulate about themselves. More research is necessary to understand the aging trajectories among this understudied population. Results highlight the need for customizable, supports (e.g., assistive technologies, home modifications) that can adjust to an individual’s changing abilities across the life span to promote independence at home.

Innovations in design and technology hold great potential to empower individuals aging with mobility impairment to maintain everyday activities and thrive. However, access to supportive devices, equipment, and housing remains a barrier for many individuals in this population. Income and insurance coverage are just a few of the factors that could limit one’s options for overcoming ADL/IADL challenges in the home. There is a need for convergence among aging and disability services, which tend to operate in silos, serving older adults, or people with disabilities; this divide is echoed in how supportive devices and equipment are accessed, delivered, and paid for in terms of eligibility and insurance. By moving from a model that emphasizes aging or disability, to one that addresses impairment as a spectrum, practitioners, and policy makers can better meet the needs of a diverse older adult population (Putnam, 2014).

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Coping Styles and Strategies

Title: Post-polio syndrome: psychological adjustment to disability.

Author: Hollingsworth L, Didelot MJ, Levington C.
Affiliation: Purdue University-Calumet, School of Education G-5, 2200 169th Street, Hammond, IN 46323-2094, USA.
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2002;23(2):135-56.
Publication Year and Month: 2002 03

Abstract: Although the Pan American Health Organization declared in 1995 that polio had been eliminated in the Western Hemisphere, life-altering effects of the disease continue for many survivors. It is known as Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS). The sheer number of individuals experiencing the symptoms has attracted the attention of the medical community. These physical symptoms are severe enough to change the quality of life and require lifestyle changes for people with PPS to cope with the disease. The psychological implications for individuals who must face the reemergence of a disease they thought they had defeated 30 to 40 years ago are staggering. Thus, there is a crucial need for health care professionals, especially mental health nurses and psychotherapists, to address mental health issues that individuals with PPS experience.

Conclusions: There is a crucial need for health care professionals, especially mental health nurses and psychotherapists, to address mental health issues that individuals with PPS experience.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There are currently 2 papers in this category.

Category: Coping Styles and Strategies

Title: Post-polio syndrome: psychological adjustment to disability.

Author: Hollingsworth L, Didelot MJ, Levington C.
Affiliation: Purdue University-Calumet, School of Education G-5, 2200 169th Street, Hammond, IN 46323-2094, USA.
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2002;23(2):135-56.
Publication Year and Month: 2002 03

Abstract: Although the Pan American Health Organization declared in 1995 that polio had been eliminated in the Western Hemisphere, life-altering effects of the disease continue for many survivors. It is known as Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS). The sheer number of individuals experiencing the symptoms has attracted the attention of the medical community. These physical symptoms are severe enough to change the quality of life and require lifestyle changes for people with PPS to cope with the disease. The psychological implications for individuals who must face the reemergence of a disease they thought they had defeated 30 to 40 years ago are staggering. Thus, there is a crucial need for health care professionals, especially mental health nurses and psychotherapists, to address mental health issues that individuals with PPS experience.

Conclusions: There is a crucial need for health care professionals, especially mental health nurses and psychotherapists, to address mental health issues that individuals with PPS experience.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Coping Styles and Strategies

Title: Aging With Long-Term Mobility Impairment: Maintaining Activities of Daily Living via Selection, Optimization, and Compensation
Author: Remillard, E.T., Bailey Fausset, C., Fain, W.B.
Affiliation: Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30318
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: The Gerontologist, gnx186, https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnx186
Publication Year and Month: 2017 11

Abstract: There is a growing number of adults with long-term mobility impairment aging into the older adult population. Little is known about the experiences of these individuals in maintaining activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) as they face age-related changes in addition to a pre-existing mobility impairment.

Research Design and Methods
Through in-home interviews with 21 participants (ages 52–86) with long-term mobility impairment, the present study employed a qualitative description design to explore perceptions of how and why select ADL/IADL routines (e.g., bed transfer, toileting) have changed over time. The selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC) model was used as a framework to organize participants’ adaptations.

Results
Among the ADL/IADL routine changes mentioned, elective selection strategies, in which a person continues to work at maintaining a task, were more frequently endorsed than loss-based selection strategies, in which a person does a task less or gets help from someone. Findings suggest that this population is actively adapting their routines to preserve their involvement in, and frequency of doing, these ADLs/IADLs. Counter to expectation, perceived age-related changes underlying activity routine changes were subtle and generally did not include sensory and cognitive declines.

Discussion and Implications
Findings provide insights into the difficulties adults with long-term mobility impairment experience as they age, as well as the adaptations they employ to overcome those challenges. Results highlight the need for customizable, mobility supports (e.g., assistive technologies, home modifications) that can adjust to an individual’s changing abilities across the life span.

Conclusions: Despite challenges, this population is actively adapting their routines to maintain ADLs/IADLs and preserve their involvement in, and frequency of doing, these activities. For older adults with long-term mobility impairment, age-related changes underlying ADL/IADL routine changes are often subtle and can be difficult for individuals to identify and articulate about themselves. More research is necessary to understand the aging trajectories among this understudied population. Results highlight the need for customizable, supports (e.g., assistive technologies, home modifications) that can adjust to an individual’s changing abilities across the life span to promote independence at home.

Innovations in design and technology hold great potential to empower individuals aging with mobility impairment to maintain everyday activities and thrive. However, access to supportive devices, equipment, and housing remains a barrier for many individuals in this population. Income and insurance coverage are just a few of the factors that could limit one’s options for overcoming ADL/IADL challenges in the home. There is a need for convergence among aging and disability services, which tend to operate in silos, serving older adults, or people with disabilities; this divide is echoed in how supportive devices and equipment are accessed, delivered, and paid for in terms of eligibility and insurance. By moving from a model that emphasizes aging or disability, to one that addresses impairment as a spectrum, practitioners, and policy makers can better meet the needs of a diverse older adult population (Putnam, 2014).

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


There are currently 2 papers in this category.

Category: Coping Styles and Strategies

Title: Aging With Long-Term Mobility Impairment: Maintaining Activities of Daily Living via Selection, Optimization, and Compensation
Author: Remillard, E.T., Bailey Fausset, C., Fain, W.B.
Affiliation: Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30318
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: The Gerontologist, gnx186, https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnx186
Publication Year and Month: 2017 11

Abstract: There is a growing number of adults with long-term mobility impairment aging into the older adult population. Little is known about the experiences of these individuals in maintaining activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) as they face age-related changes in addition to a pre-existing mobility impairment.

Research Design and Methods
Through in-home interviews with 21 participants (ages 52–86) with long-term mobility impairment, the present study employed a qualitative description design to explore perceptions of how and why select ADL/IADL routines (e.g., bed transfer, toileting) have changed over time. The selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC) model was used as a framework to organize participants’ adaptations.

Results
Among the ADL/IADL routine changes mentioned, elective selection strategies, in which a person continues to work at maintaining a task, were more frequently endorsed than loss-based selection strategies, in which a person does a task less or gets help from someone. Findings suggest that this population is actively adapting their routines to preserve their involvement in, and frequency of doing, these ADLs/IADLs. Counter to expectation, perceived age-related changes underlying activity routine changes were subtle and generally did not include sensory and cognitive declines.

Discussion and Implications
Findings provide insights into the difficulties adults with long-term mobility impairment experience as they age, as well as the adaptations they employ to overcome those challenges. Results highlight the need for customizable, mobility supports (e.g., assistive technologies, home modifications) that can adjust to an individual’s changing abilities across the life span.

Conclusions: Despite challenges, this population is actively adapting their routines to maintain ADLs/IADLs and preserve their involvement in, and frequency of doing, these activities. For older adults with long-term mobility impairment, age-related changes underlying ADL/IADL routine changes are often subtle and can be difficult for individuals to identify and articulate about themselves. More research is necessary to understand the aging trajectories among this understudied population. Results highlight the need for customizable, supports (e.g., assistive technologies, home modifications) that can adjust to an individual’s changing abilities across the life span to promote independence at home.

Innovations in design and technology hold great potential to empower individuals aging with mobility impairment to maintain everyday activities and thrive. However, access to supportive devices, equipment, and housing remains a barrier for many individuals in this population. Income and insurance coverage are just a few of the factors that could limit one’s options for overcoming ADL/IADL challenges in the home. There is a need for convergence among aging and disability services, which tend to operate in silos, serving older adults, or people with disabilities; this divide is echoed in how supportive devices and equipment are accessed, delivered, and paid for in terms of eligibility and insurance. By moving from a model that emphasizes aging or disability, to one that addresses impairment as a spectrum, practitioners, and policy makers can better meet the needs of a diverse older adult population (Putnam, 2014).

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Coping Styles and Strategies

Title: Post-polio syndrome: psychological adjustment to disability.

Author: Hollingsworth L, Didelot MJ, Levington C.
Affiliation: Purdue University-Calumet, School of Education G-5, 2200 169th Street, Hammond, IN 46323-2094, USA.
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2002;23(2):135-56.
Publication Year and Month: 2002 03

Abstract: Although the Pan American Health Organization declared in 1995 that polio had been eliminated in the Western Hemisphere, life-altering effects of the disease continue for many survivors. It is known as Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS). The sheer number of individuals experiencing the symptoms has attracted the attention of the medical community. These physical symptoms are severe enough to change the quality of life and require lifestyle changes for people with PPS to cope with the disease. The psychological implications for individuals who must face the reemergence of a disease they thought they had defeated 30 to 40 years ago are staggering. Thus, there is a crucial need for health care professionals, especially mental health nurses and psychotherapists, to address mental health issues that individuals with PPS experience.

Conclusions: There is a crucial need for health care professionals, especially mental health nurses and psychotherapists, to address mental health issues that individuals with PPS experience.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There are currently 2 papers in this category.

Category: Coping Styles and Strategies

Title: Aging With Long-Term Mobility Impairment: Maintaining Activities of Daily Living via Selection, Optimization, and Compensation
Author: Remillard, E.T., Bailey Fausset, C., Fain, W.B.
Affiliation: Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30318
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: The Gerontologist, gnx186, https://doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnx186
Publication Year and Month: 2017 11

Abstract: There is a growing number of adults with long-term mobility impairment aging into the older adult population. Little is known about the experiences of these individuals in maintaining activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) as they face age-related changes in addition to a pre-existing mobility impairment.

Research Design and Methods
Through in-home interviews with 21 participants (ages 52–86) with long-term mobility impairment, the present study employed a qualitative description design to explore perceptions of how and why select ADL/IADL routines (e.g., bed transfer, toileting) have changed over time. The selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC) model was used as a framework to organize participants’ adaptations.

Results
Among the ADL/IADL routine changes mentioned, elective selection strategies, in which a person continues to work at maintaining a task, were more frequently endorsed than loss-based selection strategies, in which a person does a task less or gets help from someone. Findings suggest that this population is actively adapting their routines to preserve their involvement in, and frequency of doing, these ADLs/IADLs. Counter to expectation, perceived age-related changes underlying activity routine changes were subtle and generally did not include sensory and cognitive declines.

Discussion and Implications
Findings provide insights into the difficulties adults with long-term mobility impairment experience as they age, as well as the adaptations they employ to overcome those challenges. Results highlight the need for customizable, mobility supports (e.g., assistive technologies, home modifications) that can adjust to an individual’s changing abilities across the life span.

Conclusions: Despite challenges, this population is actively adapting their routines to maintain ADLs/IADLs and preserve their involvement in, and frequency of doing, these activities. For older adults with long-term mobility impairment, age-related changes underlying ADL/IADL routine changes are often subtle and can be difficult for individuals to identify and articulate about themselves. More research is necessary to understand the aging trajectories among this understudied population. Results highlight the need for customizable, supports (e.g., assistive technologies, home modifications) that can adjust to an individual’s changing abilities across the life span to promote independence at home.

Innovations in design and technology hold great potential to empower individuals aging with mobility impairment to maintain everyday activities and thrive. However, access to supportive devices, equipment, and housing remains a barrier for many individuals in this population. Income and insurance coverage are just a few of the factors that could limit one’s options for overcoming ADL/IADL challenges in the home. There is a need for convergence among aging and disability services, which tend to operate in silos, serving older adults, or people with disabilities; this divide is echoed in how supportive devices and equipment are accessed, delivered, and paid for in terms of eligibility and insurance. By moving from a model that emphasizes aging or disability, to one that addresses impairment as a spectrum, practitioners, and policy makers can better meet the needs of a diverse older adult population (Putnam, 2014).

Outcome of Research: Effective

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Coping Styles and Strategies

Title: Post-polio syndrome: psychological adjustment to disability.

Author: Hollingsworth L, Didelot MJ, Levington C.
Affiliation: Purdue University-Calumet, School of Education G-5, 2200 169th Street, Hammond, IN 46323-2094, USA.
Journal: NEW - PUT DETAILS IN CITATION FIELD
Citation: Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2002;23(2):135-56.
Publication Year and Month: 2002 03

Abstract: Although the Pan American Health Organization declared in 1995 that polio had been eliminated in the Western Hemisphere, life-altering effects of the disease continue for many survivors. It is known as Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS). The sheer number of individuals experiencing the symptoms has attracted the attention of the medical community. These physical symptoms are severe enough to change the quality of life and require lifestyle changes for people with PPS to cope with the disease. The psychological implications for individuals who must face the reemergence of a disease they thought they had defeated 30 to 40 years ago are staggering. Thus, there is a crucial need for health care professionals, especially mental health nurses and psychotherapists, to address mental health issues that individuals with PPS experience.

Conclusions: There is a crucial need for health care professionals, especially mental health nurses and psychotherapists, to address mental health issues that individuals with PPS experience.

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


There are currently 2 papers in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications