Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications

Title order Author order Journal order Date order
Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: A randomized controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 for fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis
Author: Peel MM (1), Cooke M (1), Lewis-Peel HJ (1), Lea RA (2), Moyle W (1)
Affiliation: (1) NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Nursing Interventions, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia; (2) Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia
Journal: Complementary Therapies in Medicine
Citation: Complementary Therapies in Medicine 23 (2015), pp. 789-793; DOI information: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.09.002

Publication Year and Month: 2015 12

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine if coenzyme Q10 alleviates fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

DESIGN: Parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

BACKGROUND SETTING: Coenzyme Q10 has been shown to boost muscle energy metabolism in post-polio subjects but it does not promote muscle strength, endurance or function in polio survivors with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. However, the collective increased energy metabolism might contribute to a reduction in post-polio fatigue.

PARTICIPANTS: Polio survivors from the Australian post-polio networks in Queensland and New South Wales who attribute a moderate to high level of fatigue to their diagnosed late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Those with fatigue-associated comorbidities of diabetes, anaemia, hypothyroidism and fibromyalgia were excluded.

METHOD: Participants were assigned (1:1), with stratification of those who use energy-saving mobility aids, to receive 100 mg coenzyme Q10 or matching placebo daily for 60 days. Participants and investigators were blinded to group allocation. Fatigue was assessed by the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue as the primary outcome and the Fatigue Severity Scale as secondary outcome.

RESULTS: Of 103 participants, 54 were assigned to receive coenzyme Q10 and 49 to receive the placebo. The difference in the mean score reductions between the two groups was not statistically significant for either fatigue measure. Oral supplementation with coenzyme Q10 was safe and well-tolerated.

The registration number for the clinical trial is ACTRN 12612000552886.

Conclusions: A daily dose of 100 mg coenzyme Q10 for 60 days does not alleviate the fatigue of the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

Outcome of Research: Not effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome
Author: DeMayo W, Singh B, Duryea B, Riley D
Affiliation: Southern California University of the Health Sciences, USA
Journal: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Citation: Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2):24-5
Publication Year and Month: 2004 03

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract. The following is an extract:
Conemaugh Health System has completed a preliminary outcome study evaluating the benefits of Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome (PPS). This research integrates clinical trials investigating the application of Hatha yoga with ongoing patient care and education. The results of this clinical trial will be used to develop a longitudinal data collection effort integrating research and clinical trials investigating the applications of Hatha yoga in ongoing patient care and education.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Complementary therapies aim to treat the whole person, not just the symptoms. These papers propose that polio survivors should have access to the treatments that they perceive as important. However, longitudinal data collection and clinical trials investigating the applications are required for ongoing patient care and education.

There are currently 2 papers in this category.

Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome
Author: DeMayo W, Singh B, Duryea B, Riley D
Affiliation: Southern California University of the Health Sciences, USA
Journal: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Citation: Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2):24-5
Publication Year and Month: 2004 03

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract. The following is an extract:
Conemaugh Health System has completed a preliminary outcome study evaluating the benefits of Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome (PPS). This research integrates clinical trials investigating the application of Hatha yoga with ongoing patient care and education. The results of this clinical trial will be used to develop a longitudinal data collection effort integrating research and clinical trials investigating the applications of Hatha yoga in ongoing patient care and education.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: A randomized controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 for fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis
Author: Peel MM (1), Cooke M (1), Lewis-Peel HJ (1), Lea RA (2), Moyle W (1)
Affiliation: (1) NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Nursing Interventions, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia; (2) Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia
Journal: Complementary Therapies in Medicine
Citation: Complementary Therapies in Medicine 23 (2015), pp. 789-793; DOI information: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.09.002

Publication Year and Month: 2015 12

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine if coenzyme Q10 alleviates fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

DESIGN: Parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

BACKGROUND SETTING: Coenzyme Q10 has been shown to boost muscle energy metabolism in post-polio subjects but it does not promote muscle strength, endurance or function in polio survivors with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. However, the collective increased energy metabolism might contribute to a reduction in post-polio fatigue.

PARTICIPANTS: Polio survivors from the Australian post-polio networks in Queensland and New South Wales who attribute a moderate to high level of fatigue to their diagnosed late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Those with fatigue-associated comorbidities of diabetes, anaemia, hypothyroidism and fibromyalgia were excluded.

METHOD: Participants were assigned (1:1), with stratification of those who use energy-saving mobility aids, to receive 100 mg coenzyme Q10 or matching placebo daily for 60 days. Participants and investigators were blinded to group allocation. Fatigue was assessed by the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue as the primary outcome and the Fatigue Severity Scale as secondary outcome.

RESULTS: Of 103 participants, 54 were assigned to receive coenzyme Q10 and 49 to receive the placebo. The difference in the mean score reductions between the two groups was not statistically significant for either fatigue measure. Oral supplementation with coenzyme Q10 was safe and well-tolerated.

The registration number for the clinical trial is ACTRN 12612000552886.

Conclusions: A daily dose of 100 mg coenzyme Q10 for 60 days does not alleviate the fatigue of the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

Outcome of Research: Not effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Complementary therapies aim to treat the whole person, not just the symptoms. These papers propose that polio survivors should have access to the treatments that they perceive as important. However, longitudinal data collection and clinical trials investigating the applications are required for ongoing patient care and education.

There are currently 2 papers in this category.

Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome
Author: DeMayo W, Singh B, Duryea B, Riley D
Affiliation: Southern California University of the Health Sciences, USA
Journal: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Citation: Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2):24-5
Publication Year and Month: 2004 03

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract. The following is an extract:
Conemaugh Health System has completed a preliminary outcome study evaluating the benefits of Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome (PPS). This research integrates clinical trials investigating the application of Hatha yoga with ongoing patient care and education. The results of this clinical trial will be used to develop a longitudinal data collection effort integrating research and clinical trials investigating the applications of Hatha yoga in ongoing patient care and education.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: A randomized controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 for fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis
Author: Peel MM (1), Cooke M (1), Lewis-Peel HJ (1), Lea RA (2), Moyle W (1)
Affiliation: (1) NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Nursing Interventions, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia; (2) Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia
Journal: Complementary Therapies in Medicine
Citation: Complementary Therapies in Medicine 23 (2015), pp. 789-793; DOI information: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.09.002

Publication Year and Month: 2015 12

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine if coenzyme Q10 alleviates fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

DESIGN: Parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

BACKGROUND SETTING: Coenzyme Q10 has been shown to boost muscle energy metabolism in post-polio subjects but it does not promote muscle strength, endurance or function in polio survivors with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. However, the collective increased energy metabolism might contribute to a reduction in post-polio fatigue.

PARTICIPANTS: Polio survivors from the Australian post-polio networks in Queensland and New South Wales who attribute a moderate to high level of fatigue to their diagnosed late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Those with fatigue-associated comorbidities of diabetes, anaemia, hypothyroidism and fibromyalgia were excluded.

METHOD: Participants were assigned (1:1), with stratification of those who use energy-saving mobility aids, to receive 100 mg coenzyme Q10 or matching placebo daily for 60 days. Participants and investigators were blinded to group allocation. Fatigue was assessed by the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue as the primary outcome and the Fatigue Severity Scale as secondary outcome.

RESULTS: Of 103 participants, 54 were assigned to receive coenzyme Q10 and 49 to receive the placebo. The difference in the mean score reductions between the two groups was not statistically significant for either fatigue measure. Oral supplementation with coenzyme Q10 was safe and well-tolerated.

The registration number for the clinical trial is ACTRN 12612000552886.

Conclusions: A daily dose of 100 mg coenzyme Q10 for 60 days does not alleviate the fatigue of the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

Outcome of Research: Not effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Complementary therapies aim to treat the whole person, not just the symptoms. These papers propose that polio survivors should have access to the treatments that they perceive as important. However, longitudinal data collection and clinical trials investigating the applications are required for ongoing patient care and education.

There are currently 2 papers in this category.

Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: A randomized controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 for fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis
Author: Peel MM (1), Cooke M (1), Lewis-Peel HJ (1), Lea RA (2), Moyle W (1)
Affiliation: (1) NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence in Nursing Interventions, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia; (2) Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia
Journal: Complementary Therapies in Medicine
Citation: Complementary Therapies in Medicine 23 (2015), pp. 789-793; DOI information: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.09.002

Publication Year and Month: 2015 12

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine if coenzyme Q10 alleviates fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

DESIGN: Parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

BACKGROUND SETTING: Coenzyme Q10 has been shown to boost muscle energy metabolism in post-polio subjects but it does not promote muscle strength, endurance or function in polio survivors with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. However, the collective increased energy metabolism might contribute to a reduction in post-polio fatigue.

PARTICIPANTS: Polio survivors from the Australian post-polio networks in Queensland and New South Wales who attribute a moderate to high level of fatigue to their diagnosed late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Those with fatigue-associated comorbidities of diabetes, anaemia, hypothyroidism and fibromyalgia were excluded.

METHOD: Participants were assigned (1:1), with stratification of those who use energy-saving mobility aids, to receive 100 mg coenzyme Q10 or matching placebo daily for 60 days. Participants and investigators were blinded to group allocation. Fatigue was assessed by the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue as the primary outcome and the Fatigue Severity Scale as secondary outcome.

RESULTS: Of 103 participants, 54 were assigned to receive coenzyme Q10 and 49 to receive the placebo. The difference in the mean score reductions between the two groups was not statistically significant for either fatigue measure. Oral supplementation with coenzyme Q10 was safe and well-tolerated.

The registration number for the clinical trial is ACTRN 12612000552886.

Conclusions: A daily dose of 100 mg coenzyme Q10 for 60 days does not alleviate the fatigue of the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

Outcome of Research: Not effective

Availability of Paper: Paid subscription required to view or download full text.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view Abstract


Category: Complementary Therapies

Title: Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome
Author: DeMayo W, Singh B, Duryea B, Riley D
Affiliation: Southern California University of the Health Sciences, USA
Journal: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Citation: Altern Ther Health Med. 2004 Mar-Apr;10(2):24-5
Publication Year and Month: 2004 03

Abstract: This paper does not have an abstract. The following is an extract:
Conemaugh Health System has completed a preliminary outcome study evaluating the benefits of Hatha yoga and meditation in patients with post-polio syndrome (PPS). This research integrates clinical trials investigating the application of Hatha yoga with ongoing patient care and education. The results of this clinical trial will be used to develop a longitudinal data collection effort integrating research and clinical trials investigating the applications of Hatha yoga in ongoing patient care and education.

Conclusions:

Outcome of Research: More research required

Availability of Paper: The full text of this paper has been generously made available by the publisher.

Comments (if any):

Link to Paper (if available): Click here to view full text or to download


Complementary therapies aim to treat the whole person, not just the symptoms. These papers propose that polio survivors should have access to the treatments that they perceive as important. However, longitudinal data collection and clinical trials investigating the applications are required for ongoing patient care and education.

There are currently 2 papers in this category.

Outcomes of Research or Clinical Trials Activity Levels Acute Flaccid Paralysis Ageing Anaerobic Threshold Anaesthesia Assistive Technology Brain Cardiorespiratory Cardiovascular Clinical Evaluation Cold Intolerance Complementary Therapies Continence Coping Styles and Strategies Cultural Context Diagnosis and Management Differential Diagnosis Drugs Dysphagia Dysphonia Epidemiology Exercise Falls Fatigue Fractures Gender Differences Immune Response Inflammation Late Effects of Polio Muscle Strength Muscular Atrophy Orthoses Pain Polio Immunisation Post-Polio Motor Unit Psychology Quality of Life Renal Complications Respiratory Complications and Management Restless Legs Syndrome Sleep Analaysis Surgery Vitality Vocational Implications